Wednesday, 04 November

22:30

Leonine Commission sponsors a conference on the Summa theologiae in Paris [News - thomistica]

If you're going to be in Paris in early December—and who isn't?—you might want to attend a conference put on by the Société thomiste at the Saulchoir on the topic of Thomas's Summa theologiae. "Il y a 750 ans Thomas d'Aquin entreprenait la Somme de théologie."

The sessions will be held at the Saint-Jacques convent on the 3rd and 4th of December and features a line-up of current greats in European thomistic scholarship. Check out the conference program here.

 

22:16

Dewan conference begins in Ottawa tomorrow (Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015) [News - thomistica]

A symposium entitled "The Philosophy of Lawrence Dewan Metaphysics and Ethics," begins tomorrow at his beloved Collège universitaire dominicain. See this attached flyer for a list of the papers being presented.

18:32

Erbärmlich... [totaliter aliter]

Ich will jetzt gar nicht grundsätzlich werden, so von wegen "rechte Gewalt" und "linke Gewalt" ("... ganze Härte des Rechtsstaates zu spüren bekommen" oder "Müssen uns mit Härte des Rechtsstaates wehren", irgendwer?).

Aber die Gewaltbereitschaft wohlstandsverwahrloster Bildungsverweigerer, die ihre körperliche und geistige Blöße mit Antifa-Artikeln und -Parolen bedecken, die geht mir aktuell so dermaßen auf den Wecker, daß ich besser jetzt als zu spät Dampf ablasse.

In Berlin werden Fenster und Türe einer Apotheke, deren Betreiber sich für den Lebensschutz einsetzt, mit Farbe beschmiert. In Magdeburg wird ein Brandanschlag auf ein Firmengebäude von Josef v. Beverfoerde verübt, dessen Frau Hedwig v. Beverfoerde sich bei der "Demo für alle" engagiert. Und jetzt bekommt auch noch mein geschätzter Blogger-Kollege Josef Bordat massive Drohungen per E-Mail zugeschickt. Von der ganzen verbalen, psychischen und auch physischen Gewalt, den die Teilnehmer von Demonstrationen für das Leben oder gegen Genderwahn regelmäßig zu spüren bekommen, ganz zu schweigen.

Und wer zeigt sich für all diese Anschläge, die Gewalt und die Drohungen verantwortlich? Genau diese Leute, die unter bestimmten Umständen nicht laut und betroffen genug "Kein Mensch ist illegal!" in die Mikrophone und Kameras schluchzen können.

Neeeeee... Is' klaaaaaar jetzt!

"Kein Mensch ist illegal! Aber wer von diesen Legalen seine Stimme erheben oder seine Meinung äußern darf, das bestimmen immer noch wir!"

Das Hoffen auf die Einschüchterung Andersdenkender durch Gewalt und Drohung ist wahrscheinlich die kleinste Menge Macht, von der ich je gesehen habe, daß sie Menschen zu Kopfe gestiegen ist und dort irreparable Schäden angerichtet hat.

Ganz ehrlich, wer sich ständig gegen Gewalt ausspricht und sich für Toleranz einsetzt und dann durch erschreckend rücksichtslose Taten offenbart, daß er nur die Gewalt aus einer bestimmten Richtung und nur die Toleranz gegenüber bestimmten Gruppen meint, dem kann ich nicht einmal mehr raten, sich zu schämen, weil ich annehmen muß, daß in einem Kopf, der mit dieser Art von Widerspruch leben kann, ohne zu explodieren, "Scham" soviel bedeutet wie "Stolz".

Nee, liebe Antifanten, mit diesen Nummern beweist Ihr lediglich eines: Es ist einfach reiner Zufall, ob eine bestimmte Sorte Mensch nun bei den Faschos, beim IS oder bei der Antifa landet.

17:18

Such a beautiful morniing... [marcpuck]

Cloud, fog, bright sun, but I'd say it is also the first morning when it's noticeably in the 30s and not warmer: am wearing long sleeves in order to stave off as long as possible turning the office heater on.

Am hunting for a new house to live in, ahem, and the transition is evidently not to be without certain bumps along the way, one of them being that the Internet connexion disappeared last evening: my presumption is that the landlady has been doing triage with her expenses, although perhaps there is some other explanation. In any event, it is too inconvenient to post here from the house: and since the Martyrology on these pages was intended to suggest prayers et cetera for the successful completion of the work of the late Synod, ahem, I believe I'm done with putting it here every morning. I suspect I did not pray quite often enough, or with the proper attitude. 


***

I'm in the mood for some Haydn, although am not feeling very martial; honestly, am not sure why it is called that, this symphony. Perhaps a listen will tell; haven't heard it in months that I can recall. Had to miss the recent performance of his so-called St Caecilia Mass at the University, having managed to scratch the surface of my left eye while waking up that morning: no Mass, and no Haydn's Mass that afternoon, either. It was Wednesday before it was all done with, tsk.


16:18

'Vatileaks II' and the enemies of reform [CatholicCulture.org - Commentary on Catholic News and World Affairs]

In his novel Shoes of the Fisherman, Morris West has an old Vatican hand give this advice to a newly elected Pope from a country far away from Rome:

14:22

Towards What? [Fr Ray Blake's Blog]

newwaysministryblog.wordpress.com-o-POPE-FRANCIS-facebook"I lost my faith", said a lady sometime ago, "I went to Mass at St X and Bishop Y was there and he said it was very unlikely to be true that the three kings came to Bethlehem and anyhow we didn;t have believe it". "Well it occurred to me if we didn't have believe that, Father, we don't we have to believe anything. So I started questioning everything I did believe and I decided I didn't believe in anything, even in God". Remove one bick an the Temple falls. I have known priests and even bishops, sad individuals, who seemed to delight in destroying faith rather building it up.

As a priest I am conscious of how frail God's gifts are, how slight our grasp on them can be, we hold on to them by gossamer threads, which are easily broken. Faith is easily damaged, maybe because it is the most supernatural gift of all, it can thrive in prison and under torture but it is the most vulnerable to damage through the Church and her ministers. Religious practise is often the last thing to disappear, for clergy they will always drag themselves to the altar, not being strong enough to dig or too proud to beg, but once faith goes, so does hope and eventually the practice of charity breaks down too. Mgr Charamsa is perhaps an example of this.

Those things which were once a joy can become a terrible burden.  Prayer once a delight becomes a bed of thorns, a mess of distractions, poverty or simplicity of life once happily embraced becomes a condemnation to bleak hopelessness, chastity a constant reminder of emptiness.

 At the Synod and now afterwards I wonder if some senior clergy are deliberately setting out to destroy, to take away just one or two bricks so the whole Temple collapses, it is as if their own faith has left them and they resent other people's faith

Priests and bishops are supposed to build up faith, not break it down. If we do, "It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin".

I know we priests can easily live in our own little bubble and meet only people who share our views, I know a very few Jews, a few Muslims, a few Orthodox but the majority of people I know are Catholics and Catholics of a particular sort. I was thinking last night I do not know any Methodists, or Quakers, or Unitarians, or for that matter Jesuits! Most of the priests I know all seem to be unhappy with the direction the Church seems to be being nudged into taking. Priests tend to be reflective and introspective, we have learnt to keep our own counsel, most don't blog, most don't write to newspapers, even Catholic one's. Most are unlikely to write to their bishop or even talk much to him, especially about their concerns for the Church, especially if he is unlikely to agree with them. But then so many bishops seem equally confused.


Following the Synod, some who might be in the know, like Cardinal Nichols, hint that change is in the offing, see his recent Pastoral Letter on the Synod on the Family. Other Bishops, Cardinal Pell for example, assure us that there will not be, or cannot be change in doctrine, perhaps they are a little less definite nowadays about changes in pastoral practice, and even less definite about about changes to the faith itself. We can tell ourselves that the Church is unchanging, that Christ is with her until the end of time, but we have seen the Church changing a great deal in the last fifty years since Vatican II. At one time we were told the Mass was unchangeable, when the Mass changed, our belief in the Eucharist was unchanging but as I have said before, compare the Eucharistic faith of the children of Sts. Louis and Zelie Martin with the South American child whose bishop spoke approvingly of him at the Synod, who broke the host in half to share with his divorced and remarried father.

A friend was at one of those Catholic literary lunches and met a writer for that 'Catholic' weekly, who said, 'I do hate the Catholic Church, don't you?' She then continued, 'I do think Pope Francis is so good for the Church'. It seems like madness to me but then there are those in the Church who do actually hate it and want its ruin or destruction. Judas after all sat table with Christ and the bishops. After Simon made his profession of faith and is called Cephas, Peter, the next time Jesus addresses him, he calls him Satan, 'Get behind me, Satan, for your thoughts are man's, not God's'.


the truth // lion // defend // leo: Leo Thang, Leo I, Leo Richard, Leo Lionesses, Leo Women, Leo Stuff, Leo Girls, August Leo, Leo QuotesFrom the Patristic exegesis of Pope Benedict which tended to build up faith, we have moved to dark world of confusion and ambiguity. From letting Truth go free to defend itself we have moved into a period where there are truths and then there are truths. Uncertainty and confusion are not of God, they damage faith, they do not build it up. In this environment the old debates about the Papacy of Bellarmine and Suarez have suddenly taken on a new life, maybe not with intellectual giants like 'people who disagree with the Pope because they don't like him', Cdl Wuerl or elitist American academics (why do they always want to address emotions and never address arguments?) but with many ordinary Catholics, clergy especially, thinking laity too. It is not something new for Catholics to ask, what if the Pope... is misguided, is in the pay of the Spanish, French or Austrians, is captured by Muslims, is a heretic, is evil, is suffering from megalomania, or is going senile or mad, these questions were asked before and are being asked now by people trying their best, for the good of the Church, to understand the mess we appear to be in. Under Pius XII the question was what if the Pope is captured by the Nazis or drugged by Communists.


communist crossThe apparent cruelty and still unknown charges against the Franciscans of the Immaculate, the extraordinary speech in Paraguay, accusing the Paraguayan government, and specifically the president, of the abduction of Edelio Morinigo, which he put into a context of the worst atrocities of the Nazis and Communists, Morinigo in fact turned out to be a policeman abducted by rebels against the government, the agreement to accept that extraordinary Marxist crucifix and decorations in Bolivia, the support of child abuse covering up bishops like Bishop Juan Barros in Chile or Cardinal Danneels who was invited to the Synod apparently as a reward for his support in the Conclave, his returning again and again to the journalist Scalfari, who apparently misreports him, his packing of the Synod with pro-Kasperians, his apparent manipulation of both the extraordinary Synod last year and the ordinary Synod this year, his promotion of the now arrested Chaouqui and Vallejo Balda (Chaouqui, if you remember, was bought in to manage the papal image and public relations), these are some of the reasons questions are being raised quite openly in the Italian press and increasingly by the media elsewhere. It was these incidents that raised concern over the Holy Father's health and in the rather overblown Italian style, the suggestion of a brain tumour, but this was the most extreme end of concerns and perhaps the most easily dismissed in order to scotch others.


Msgr. Fabian Pedacchio Leaniz in the Vatican on June 23, 2013. Credit: Alan Holdren/CNA.It is of note that Lifesite carries questions about the influences of the Pope's involvement with the 'gay mafia', and at least raises in my mind question of his own complicity with the St Gall group, no-one has suggested, yet that he attended the St Gall meetings. It seems from the reports that was merely passive, their candidate', but then there were all those faxes or emails sent from the Congregation of Bishops to the office of the Cardinal Archbishop of Buenos Aires by Mgr Fabián Pedacchio, who is now the Pope's Secretary.

13:03

Magnificat Website. Magnificat Mass Booklet [Dom Donald's Blog]



Our ministry has given the publication written permission to use our trademark name, Magnificat. As a result, the ministry financially benefits from each paid subscription. We feel this is one of those win-win situations for everyone.
Magnificat, the monthly Catholic prayer booklet and worship guide is a lavishly printed, pocket-sized worship aid designed to help you: 1) develop your prayer and spiritual life; 2) find a way to a more profound love for Our Blessed Savior; and 3) participate in the holy Mass with greater fervor. It features beautiful prayers for both morning and evening, patterned after the treasures of the Liturgy of the Hours, and it contains the official texts of the daily Mass. It also has meditations written by the renowned Fathers of the Church, and a great variety of spiritual writings with essays on the lives of the saints of today and the past. In each Magnificat, you will also find an article giving valuable spiritual insight into a masterpiece of sacred art.
An annual subscription has fourteen issues – one for each month plus special issues for Holy Week and Christmas. If you are not already enjoying your subscription to Magnificat, we encourage you to treat yourself to this monthly liturgical prayer book filled with much to ponder on the spiritual journey.  Please don’t forget to share this information with your family, friends, parish and ministries. Click here for more information.
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07:20

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO If a tiny spark of God’s love already burns within you, do not expose it to the wind, for it may get blown out. [Dom Donald's Blog]


SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO ARCHBISHOP, CARDINAL 1538-1584
Feast: November 4
SECOND READING  iBreviary http://www.ibreviary.com/m/breviario.php?s=ufficio_delle_letture    

From a sermon given during the last synod he attended, by Saint Charles, bishop
(Acta Ecclesiae Mediolanensis 1599, 1177-1178)

Practice what you preach


I admit that we are all weak, but if we want help, the Lord God has given us the means to find it easily. One priest may wish to lead a good, holy life, as he knows he should. He may wish to be chaste and to reflect heavenly virtues in the way he lives. Yet he does not resolve to use suitable means, such as penance, prayer, the avoidance of evil discussions and harmful and dangerous friendships. Another priest complains that as soon as he comes into church to pray the office or to celebrate Mass, a thousand thoughts fill his mind and distract him from God. But what was he doing in the sacristy before he came out for the office or for Mass? How did he prepare? What means did he use to collect his thoughts and to remain recollected?

Would you like me to teach you how to grow from virtue to virtue and how, if you are already recollected at prayer, you can be even more attentive next time, and so give God more pleasing worship? Listen, and I will tell you. If a tiny spark of God’s love already burns within you, do not expose it to the wind, for it may get blown out. Keep the stove tightly shut so that it will not lose its heat and grow cold. In other words, avoid distractions as well as you can. Stay quiet with God. Do not spend your time in useless chatter.

If teaching and preaching is your job, then study diligently and apply yourself to whatever is necessary for doing the job well. Be sure that you first preach by the way you live. If you do not, people will notice that you say one thing, but live otherwise, and your words will bring only cynical laughter and a derisive shake of the head.

Are you in charge of a parish? If so, do not neglect the parish of your own soul, do not give yourself to others so completely that you have nothing left for yourself. You have to be mindful of your people without becoming forgetful of yourself.

My brothers, you must realize that for us churchmen nothing is more necessary than meditation. We must meditate before, during and after everything we do. The prophet says: I will pray, and then I will understand. When you administer the sacraments, meditate on what you are doing. When you celebrate Mass, reflect on the sacrifice you are offering. When you pray the office, think about the words you are saying and the Lord to whom you are speaking. When you take care of your people, meditate on how the Lord’s blood that has washed them clean so that all that you do becomes a work of love.

This is the way we can easily overcome the countless difficulties we have to face day after day, which, after all, are part of our work: in meditation we find the strength to bring Christ to birth in ourselves and in other men.

     
     
RESPONSORY
1 Timothy 6:11; 4:11, 12, 6


Seek after integrity and holiness, faith and love, patience and gentleness.
 These are the things you must command and teach;
be an example to all who believe.

If you give them this advice,
you will be a good servant of Christ Jesus.
 These are the things you must command and teach;
be an example to all who believe.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Let us pray.

Father,
keep in your people the spirit
which filled Charles Borromeo.
Let your Church be continually renewed
and show the image of Christ to the world
by being conformed to his likeness,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
 Amen.


EWTN
Provided Courtesy of: 
Eternal Word Television Network
Among the great reformers of the troubled sixteenth century was Charles Borromeo, who, with St. Francis of Loyola, St. Philip Neri, and others, led the movement to combat the inroads of the Protestant Reformation. His father, Count Gilbert Borromeo, was a man of piety and ability, and his mother was a member of the famous Medici family of Milan, sister of Angelo de Medici, later to become Pope Pius IV. The second of two sons in a family of six children, Charles was born in the castle of Arona on Lake Maggiore, on October 2, 1538. He was so devout that at the age of twelve he received the tonsure. At this time his paternal uncle, Julius Caesar Borromeo, turned over to him the income from a rich Benedictine abbey, one of the ancient perquisites of this noble family. In spite of his youth, Charles had a sense of responsibility, and he made plain to his father that all revenues from the abbey beyond what was required to prepare him for a career in the Church belonged to the poor and could not be applied to secular use. To take such a scrupulous stand in a period of corruption and decadence was unusual, and most significant as an indication of Charles' integrity of character.

 Pennsylvania
     
The young man attended the University of Pavia, where he applied himself to the study of civil and canon law. Due to a slight impediment of speech, he was regarded as slow; yet his thoroughness and industry more than compensated for the handicap, and his strict behaviour made him a model for his fellow students, who, in this era of the Renaissance, were for the most part pleasure-loving and dissipated. Charles now accepted a sufficient income from the abbey to meet the expenses of the kind of household a young nobleman was expected to maintain. By the time he took his doctor's degree at twenty-two his parents were dead and his elder brother, Frederick, was head of the family. Charles had no sooner returned home than the news came that his uncle, Cardinal Angelo de Medici, had been elected Pope Pius IV. A few months later the new Pope sent for his nephew to come to Rome, and within a very short time Charles was the recipient of such a wealth of honors, offices, and powers that he became a leading figure at the papal court. He was appointed cardinal-deacon and administrator of the see of Milan, although he was not to take up his work there for many years; he was named legate of Bologna, Romagna, and the March of Ancona; protector of Portugal, the Low Countries, and the Catholic cantons of Switzerland; supervisor of the Franciscan and Carmelite Orders, and of the Knights of Malta, and administrator of the papal states. The Pope's confidence in him was not misplaced, for Charles displayed great energy, ability, and diplomacy in fulfilling these various duties. Methodical and diligent, he learned how to despatch business affairs with speed and efficiency.
Pope Francis at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary
   
Yet in spite of his heavy tasks, Charles found time for recreation in music and physical exercise. He had the many-sidedness which we associate with men of the Renaissance, and was deeply interested in the advancement of learning. He set up at the Vatican a literary academy of clergy and laymen, and some of the studies and talks growing out of it were published as <Noctes Vaticanae>, to which Charles himself was a contributor. It was the custom for one in his position to live in magnificent state, but splendid trappings meant nothing to him. He remained modest and humble in spirit, and wholly aloof from the worldly temptations of Rome.
     
     
When the Venerable Bartholomew de Martyribus, archbishop of Braga, came to Rome, Charles consulted him as to his future. "You know what it is," he is recorded as saying, "to be the nephew of a pope, and a beloved nephew; nor are you ignorant of what it is to live at the court of Rome. The dangers are infinite. What ought I to do, young as I am, and without experience? God has given me ardor for penance, and an earnest desire to prefer Him to all things; and I have some thought of going into a monastery, to live as if there were only God and myself in the world." The prelate advised Charles to stay on at Rome, where he was so greatly needed. This proved to be excellent counsel, for an even greater opportunity for service to the Church was to come to the young man.
The Pope, soon after his election, announced the reassembling of the Council of Trent, which had been suspended ten years earlier, in 1552. Charles now devoted himself to plans for the resumption of deliberations, and was in attendance during the two years that the Council continued in session at Trent (Italian, Trento), a city of northern Italy. Its purpose was to conclude the work of formulating and codifying Church doctrine and to bring about a genuine reform of abuses. It defined original sin, decreed the perpetuity of the marital tie, pronounced anathema against those who rejected the invocation of saints or the veneration of relics, or who denied the existence of Purgatory or the validity of indulgences. It also dealt with episcopal jurisdiction, the education of seminarists, and discipline for the clergy. Some of the points proved so controversial that several times the Council almost broke up with its labors unfinished. Charles is credited with helping to heal the rifts and spurring the prelates and theologians on to the conclusion of their historic task. He is also conceded to have had a large share in drawing up the Tridentine Catechism. His training in diplomacy at the papal court had served him well.
In this flowering time of all the arts, Church music showed remarkable development. Among Charles' duties was the commissioning of composers to write liturgical music. The renowned Palestrina, later to become Vatican choir master, composed at this time the glorious Mass called "Papae Marcelli," and other choral works that set a new standard for polyphonic music.

While the Council of Trent was in session, Charles' elder brother died, and as head of the family Charles became proprietor of extensive land holdings. Since he was only in minor orders, people thought that he would now marry, but Charles remained true to the course he had marked out for himself. Yielding his family position to his Uncle Julius, he entered the priesthood in September, 1563. Three months later he became bishop of Milan, as well as cardinal-priest, with the title of St. Prassede. For a long time Charles had been concerned over the see of Milan, to which, years before, he had been appointed administrator. Catholics were falling away from the Church, chiefly because there had been no resident bishop at Milan for eighty years. The new bishop was welcomed with joy and he set to work vigorously to reform this important diocese. Soon he was called back to Rome to assist the Pope on his deathbed, at which Philip Neri, another future saint, was also present. The new Pope, Pius V, who was to follow in the noble tradition of his predecessor, urged Charles to remain with him for a time. Soon, however, with the Pope's blessing, he returned to Milan.

Charles now concentrated his great abilities on the establishment of schools, seminaries, and convents. But more important than the improvement of the physical structures through which the Church must carry on its work was the need for reform of the priestly function itself. Throughout the region religious practices were profaned by grave abuses; the Sacrament was neglected, for many priests were both lazy and ignorant; the monasteries were relaxed in discipline and full of disorders. These widespread faults had been engendered in part by the decay of medieval society and in part by the revival of the ideas of pagan antiquity. By remonstrance and exhortation Charles worked to raise the level of spiritual life, and to put into effect the ecclesiastical changes indicated by the Council of Trent. He founded the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, with its Sunday Schools for the teaching of the Catechism to children. Historically these were the first Sunday Schools, and are. said to have numbered 740. He instituted a secular fraternity whose members, called the Oblates of St. Ambrose, pledged obedience to their bishop and were used by him in religious work in any manner he thought wise. The bishop's income from his family estates was considerable, and nearly all of it was turned over to an almoner for the relief of the poor; plate and other valuables were sold for the same purpose. In conformity with the decrees of the Council of Trent, the cathedral of Milan was cleared of its gorgeous tombs, banners, and arms. In his zeal for reform Charles came into conflict with the governor of the province and the senate, who feared the Church was encroaching upon the civil jurisdiction. The opposition to Charles and the complaints against him were carried to King Philip II of Spain, who had sovereignty over this part of Italy, and to the Pope; in the end Charles was completely exonerated. His days were filled with duties and cares; at night he would take off his bishop's robes, don a tattered old cassock, and pass the evening in study and prayer. He lived as simply as it was possible to do. One cold night when someone wanted to have his bed warmed, he said, "The best way not to find a bed cold is to go to bed colder than the bed is." However, he did not allow his rigorous self-discipline to weaken him for the work he had to do.
The almost inaccessible Alpine valleys lying in the northern part of his diocese had been virtually abandoned by the clergy. The bishop did not hesitate to undertake journeys to these remote valleys and mountain tops. He discussed theology with peasants and taught the Catechism to herdboys. Everywhere he preached and effected reforms, replacing unworthy priests by those who were zealous to restore the faith. In 1576 he successfully met another challenge. There was famine at Milan due to crop failures, and later came an outbreak of the plague. The city's trade fell off, and along with it the people's source of income. The governor and many members of the nobility fled the city, but the bishop remained, to organize the care of those who were stricken and to minister to the dying. He called together the superiors of all the religious communities in the diocese, and won their cooperation. He used up his own funds and went into debt to provide food for the hungry. Finally he wrote to the governor, and shamed him into coming back to his post.
The bishop's reforms were opposed by the Humiliati (Brothers of Humility), a decayed penitential order which, although reduced to about 170 members, owned some ninety monasteries. Three of its priors hatched a plot to assassinate Charles, and he was actually fired upon while at evening prayers with his household. Charles refused to have the would-be assassin sought out and punished. The Humiliati at length submitted to the reform of their order.

Many English Catholics had fled to Italy at this time because of the persecutions under Queen Elizabeth. The bishop had a Welshman, Dr. Griffith Roberts, as canon theologian, and an Englishman, Thomas Goldwell, as vicar-general. He carried about on his person a little picture of St. John Fisher, who, with St. Thomas More, had been martyred for the faith during the reign of Henry VIII. 

Travels in his diocese, especially in the difficult Alpine country, had weakened the bishop's constitution. In 1584, during his annual retreat at Monte Varallo, he was stricken with ague, and on returning to Milan grew rapidly worse. After receiving the Last Sacraments, the beloved bishop died quietly on November 4, at the age of forty-six. Canonization followed in 1610. St. Charles Borromeo's sermons were published at Milan in the eighteenth century and have been widely translated. Two years after his death the Borromean League was formed in the Catholic cantons of Switzerland, for the expulsion of heretics. Contrary to his wishes, a memorial was erected in the Milan cathedral, where his body now rests, and at Arona, his birthplace, stands an impressive statue in his honor. For his piety, energy, and effectiveness this eminent churchman soon became known as a "second Ambrose." He is the patron of Lombardy; his emblems are the Holy Communion and a coat of arms bearing the word Humilitas.

Saint Charles Borromeo, Archbishop, Cardinal. Celebration of Feast Day is November 4.
Taken from "Lives of Saints", Published by John J. Crawley & Co., Inc.

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CNA - Saint of the Day XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CNA Daily News XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CNA Daily News - Vatican XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CNS Movie Reviews XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CNS Top Stories XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CNS Vatican News XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Commentary - thomistica XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Community in Mission XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Comunión Tradicionalista XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Conjectures of a Guilty Bystander XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Corpus Christi Watershed news XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Creative Minority Report XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
CRISTIANDAD XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Cum Lazaro XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
David Scott Writings XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Denzinger-Katholik XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Diligite iustitiam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Dom Donald's Blog XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Dominicana XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Dominus mihi adjutor XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Dyspeptic Mutterings XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Eastern Christian Books XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Edinburgh Housewife XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Edward Feser XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
et nunc XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Ethika Politika XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
EUCist News XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Faithful Answers XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
For the Queen XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Fr Ray Blake's Blog XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Fr. Z's Blog XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Galileo Was Wrong XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Gratia Super Naturam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
History of Interpretation XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
https://creamcitycatholic.com/feed/ XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
I Have to Sit Down XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
iBenedictines XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
IDLE SPECULATIONS XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
ignatius his conclave XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Il Blog di Raffaella. Riflessioni e commenti fra gli Amici di Benedetto XVI XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
In Campo Aperto XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
In the Light of the Law XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Incarnation and Modernity XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Infallible Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Instaurare Omnia in Christo - The Blog XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Jimmy Akin XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
John G. Brungardt, Ph.L. XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
John V. Gerardi XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Just Thomism XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
katholon XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Korrektiv XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Laodicea XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Laudator Temporis Acti XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Le blog d'Yves Daoudal XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Lectio Divina Notes XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
LES FEMMES - THE TRUTH XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Lex Christianorum XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Ley Natural XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Little Flower Farm XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
LMS Chairman XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Loved As If XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
marcpuck XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Mary Victrix XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Mathias von Gersdorff XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Musings of a Pertinacious Papist XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Liturgical Movement XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Sherwood XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Song XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
News - thomistica XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
NICK'S CATHOLIC BLOG XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
One Mad Mom XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
OnePeterFive XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Opus Publicum XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Over the Rhine and Into the Tiber XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Oz Conservative XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Paths of Love XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Psallam Domino XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RORATE CÆLI XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RSS XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Sancrucensis XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Scholastiker XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Semiduplex XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Siris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Spirit of Teuchtar II XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Conleth's Catholic Heritage Association XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Peter's List XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Steeple and State XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Symposium XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tęsknota XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Taylor Marshall XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tea at Trianon XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
That The Bones You Have Crushed May Thrill XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The American Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Badger Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Dormitory XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Thing XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The City and the World XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Daily Register XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Deacon's Bench XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Divine Lamp XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Eponymous Flower XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The hermeneutic of continuity XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Jesuit Post XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Josias XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Lepanto Institute XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Low Churchman's Guide to the Solemn High Mass XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Paraphasic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Prosblogion XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Rad Trad XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Remnant Newspaper - The Remnant Newspaper - Remnant Articles XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sacred Page XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sensible Bond XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The TOF Spot XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Theological Flint XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
totaliter aliter XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Traditional Catholic Priest XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Transalpine Redemptorists at home XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unam Sanctam Catholicam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unequally Yoked XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Voice of the Family XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vox Cantoris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vultus Christi XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Whispers in the Loggia XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Zippy Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
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