Friday, 13 November

19:39

But I'm looking forward to reading Mons Chaput's essay at First Things... [marcpuck]

The Holy Father received in audience the Romano Guardini Foundation officials today and pronounced an allocution that seems quite fine to me, citing Dostoevsky's Zosima; the Sovereign Pontiff concludes:
... Perhaps we can apply Guardini’s reflections to our time, seeking to discover God’s hand in present-day events. Then, perhaps, we will be able to recognize that God in His wisdom, has sent to us, in rich Europe, the hungry so that we will give him to eat, the thirsty so that we will give him to drink, the stranger so that we will receive him and the naked, so that we clothe him. History will then demonstrate: if we are a people, we will certainly receive him as our brother; if we are only a group of more or less organized individuals, we will be tempted to save our skin first of all, but we will not have continuity....
While I'm not quite sure what 'but we will not have continuity' means or refers to, I'm also unsure what Dr Magister is going on about at Settimo Cielo: we all seem to be definitely convinced that his Holiness is going to take such a profoundly indefensible action with respect to the practice of the reception of Holy Communion by the divorced-and-remarried that every least word is viewed suspiciously through that prospective lens. It's true that Guardini's 'mystical' notion of 'the people' is problematic, specially since the development of the 'liberation theologies' in South America et cetera. Who would seriously argue that we in the US, e.g., are these days a true 'people' and not 'only a group of more or less organised individuals'? 

19:05

In Praise of the Divine Office [Spirit of Teuchtar II]

“I would like to renew my call to everyone to pray the Psalms, to become accustomed to using the Liturgy of the Hours, Lauds, Vespers, and Compline.” Pope Benedict VI

I was introduced to our Catholic Divine Office by an Anglican prayer community that used it. At the time I was a Presbyterian so the concept of liturgical prayer was new to me. But this introduction to liturgical prayer led to an attachment that has remained with me since. 
The Divine Office takes me daily into the liturgical life of the Church. The Liturgy of the Church isn’t just for Sunday’s and Holy Days or any other day we attend Mass. It is there for us every day, and even for different times of every day.  

Maybe the fact that at time of writing this Sunday will be the 32nd of Ordinary Time doesn’t mean that much to some apart from to help find the correct pages for the readings in the missal, but I find entering into the liturgy more fully is entering more fully into the spiritual life and communion I share as part of the Body of Christ.

An adage I heard approaching the end of Lent once went along the lines of “fast with the Church, feast with the Church!” So I am adding “pray with the Church!”

The Divine Office, including the main Offices of Lauds, Vespers and Compline are largely made up of Psalms and whilst Jesus Christ died with the Psalms on His lips the very same Psalms are at the same time the cry of His people. This is an incredible spiritual realisation yet paradox and in itself a great proof of the authenticity of our faith. I get a sweeping sense of the magnitude of salvation history and what we are part of whilst praying the Psalms - the new Israel, journeying in the wilderness between the dangers of our spiritual enemies and the refuge we find in God within His new temple, Mother Church.

The Divine Office celebrates saints and events we are not obligated to by attending Mass on Sunday’s or Holy Days so I have become more aware of these saints and events and how the Church views them. It has helped increase my knowledge of scripture and tradition and therefore the whole Catholic faith handed down and certainly my understanding and appreciation of salvation story. 

There are different options of Office to use and as a bit of a breviary anorak I admit that I do mix it about. If I were stuck in a Benedictine Abbey I wouldn’t have the option to vary but I am not, so I do! Apart from the modern Liturgy of the Hours, there are also Traditional Offices available to us such as the Monastic Diurnal or the Breviarium Romanum which contain Latin and English Translations side by side. To name but just a few! Even though I pray the Traditional Offices almost entirely in English, using these from time to time has given me the unexpected bonus of introducing me to Ecclesiastical Latin.

The good news is the internet now means the Divine Offices both modern and traditional are now easily accessible, inexpensive, and give you the option of variety if that helps you. If you travel a lot but own a mobile phone or tablet you have everything you need to recite the Offices. There are some great web-sites and internet resources out there both for accessing them and learning how to recite them.

Personal prayer or liturgical prayer? The Divine Office can supplement and enhance my prayer life, not replace it, and I am still mixing personal prayer time around the Office in different ways.

For early morning birds like myself Lauds is easy, but when the cares of the day have taken hold Vespers and Compline can be a bit more difficult to remain faithful to. For others it will be different but I realise unlike our clergy and religious I haven’t signed up for anything and I do what I can how I can. It can literally change with the seasons between reciting Vespers on its own before the evening activities start to reciting it later and even combining it with Compline.  It is also possible to combine the Office of Readings with Lauds, and mixing in the daily Mass readings is always a great option for both Lauds and Vespers if you do not attend Mass every day.  
I try and stick at it even at times of being conscience of sin or of dryness in prayer. (Todays Short Reading at Vespers included the text from Romans 12 “be patient under trial and persevere in prayer!”)

Over the years picking up my Office book has been the first step back into the confessional. To be conscience of sin and discover a penitential Psalm like Miserere Me (Psalm 50) or De Profundis (Psalm 129) awaiting me in the Breviary is a great blessing and not something to be feared. The Office isn’t Holy Communion. As surely as trials will come, more frequently the Word of God speaks to us when and how we need it. Along with the Psalms the readings and commentaries from the saints are a great treasure which we access to each day and praying with the whole Church I am never alone, just as a Catholic parish is never alone at Mass.  

The Prayer of the Church is primarily to give glory to God not for our spiritual consolation, so although I rejoice in the days I get some spiritual crumbs and consolations, it is a good habit to arrive without expectation, and just to recite the Office to be said and let the Holy Spirit do the rest.

I am not a theologian or a spiritual advisor so do tread with care. That said, I heartily and humbly recommend considering taking up your prayer books with Mother Church! Or your tablets even!

THE ABOVE ARTICLE WAS PRODUCED FOR WWW.MERE-CATHOLICISM.COM

18:34

Am being made a bit peevish by the vicissitudes... [marcpuck]

Of work and finding a new place to live here in Eugene et cetera, and so last night's concert at the Hult Center-- the Eugene Symphony performing Dvorak's 'From the New World' after Edgard Varèse's Amériques-- was a welcome respite. I had never heard the Varèse; while it's not a piece that I will listen to repeatedly and with affection it certainly is a great mass of interesting sound, waves of sound, massive modern-sounding sound. Wasn't so much impressed by Ives's The Unanswered Question; tricks and games, pft.

Am at work, happily listening to Cold War Kids since KWAX is being unimaginative. 


And 'Hospital Beds':

18:17

Selective compassion: the dangerous step the Pope might take [CatholicCulture.org - Commentary on Catholic News and World Affairs]

Sometime soon—we know not when—Pope Francis will issue a document concluding the work of the Synod on the Family. One question looms over all others: Will the Pope endorse the Kasper proposal?

14:09

Stoicism and Eudaimonistic ethics [Cum Lazaro]

                                                                 Where's Zeno...?


After reading a report from STOICON 2015 (ie a conference on Stoicism) (here) I tweeted the following question:

Reading report from STOICON wonder here about relative attractiveness of Stoicism vs Ancient Philosophy in general. Arguably all Ancient Philosophy is therapeutic, but what is it about Stoic therapy that appeals? (Why eg don't we take Platonic injunctions to mathematics or even theurgy as seriously?) For a modern 'therapeutic' Platonism see

(That provoked a very helpful exchange mostly with Cathy Barry (@Cathyby) with Jules Evans (@julesevans77) joining in at the end to which I'm grateful for prompting me to further thought.)

The original question wasn't (purely anyway) rhetorical: Stoicism does seem peculiarly attractive to many moderns and I'm not sure exactly why. In the report I linked to above, much of what is valued in Stoicism is common to much ancient philosophy. For example, most ancient ethics is therapeutic in the sense that it offers to improve your life: to make you eudaimon (flourishing). Moreover, it is focused primarily on internal goods (the virtues) rather than external goods (stuff, social status). To the extent that Stoicism tends (more than other schools) to be (at least) deistic, perfectionist, rationalist, suspicious of emotions and utterly dismissive of external goods (you can be as eudaimon on a rack as you can be watching TV with a good whisky), it might well be thought to have particular difficulties that make it less attractive to the modern mind than other ancient ethical approaches.

I'm pretty sure that most of the answer lies in the peculiarities of Roman Stoicism, and in particular the philosophers Marcus Aurelius, Epictetus and Seneca. Roughly, all of these tend to be much more interested in practical techniques rather than in the more foundational questions raised by the earlier Greek Stoics. Moreover, to the extent that Stoicism in general rejects external circumstances as an element in flourishing to a quite unusual degree (certainly when compared to the Peripatetics), it is peculiarly compatible with any modern lifestyle: why change your life when you can just change your mind?

Now, I have two related worries about this. First, technique without asking serious questions about what purposes those techniques serve isn't philosophy , certainly not in a sense that Socrates or a modern academic philosopher would recognize it. (Indeed, were I to be waspish, Plato might well find a combination of marketable techniques and the promise of success in the everyday world rather more characteristic of sophistry than philosophy.) And to the extent that philosophy, that personal, desperate grappling with truth, is part of the good life, then a focus on technique together with a distraction from the pursuit of truth is at least unfortunate and perhaps harmful. Secondly, to the extent I've reflected on the ethical claims of Stoicism, I'm pretty sure they're wrong. In ancient terms, I suppose I'd count as close to a Peripatetic (ie Aristotelian) with a consequent emphasis on the need for reforming the political space, a focus on good upbringing, the cultivation of appropriate emotions (including anger)  and contemplation of 'divine things' as the perfect life. Whether I'm right in that judgment isn't terribly important: what is important is that many of the specific claims of Stoicism are by no means clearly correct and if the techniques recommended actually do have an effect, they may well be producing vice rather than virtue.

I suppose at the end I'm left with wondering what would be lost or gained if we didn't have conferences like STOIKON or events like Stoic Week, and instead had VIRTUEETHICSCON or Eudaimonia week. What would be lost, I think, is the coherence of a brand: here is something with a fairly coherent message and with immediate, relatively easy instructions for getting involved at once. You don't have to think much: you just have to be attracted and act. And that's not necessarily a bad thing: we all have to start somewhere and most of us have stumbled onto the deeper things that inform our lives by some sort of combination of luck and immediate (erotic) attraction. I'm not sure that any other school of ancient philosophy can do that quite as easily as Stoicism (although Mark Anderson has a damn good go for Platonism) even if I'm pushed to be absolutely clear as to why that's the case. (Another suggestion that crosses my mind is that it is to do with the occasional, conversational style of Roman Stoicism (esp) Seneca, quite apart from the issue of content. Much more engaging than (say) the 'contents of an academic's wastebin' style of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. But anyway...) But I think it would be terribly sad if you stopped there and didn't explore ancient ethics further and, in particular, when examining Stoic claims, ask: Is this true? Is this truly virtuous?

Why does any of this matter, except to those (undoubtedly a minority) who have an existing interest in ancient philosophy? There are a number of possible answers to this, many centring on the general role of classical studies in modern education. But let me give a more narrowly philosophical answer. There is a view (one I largely share), developing from Elizabeth Anscombe and Alasdair MacIntyre that there is something radically amiss with modern moral philosophy. (Anscombe's paper of that name is the locus classicus for this analysis.) In essence, both advise a return to eudaimonistic ethics, an ethics based on human flourishing and the virtues. If anything along those lines is right, then adopting the correct view of eudaimonia and its attainment is of central importance not only to each individual's life, but also to our wider society. Stoicism may well be an excellent introduction to that ressourcement and the general pattern of eudaimonistic ethcs, but it is one that we Aristotelian-Thomists at least would like to see subject to philosophical challenge and ultimate abandonment.


13:30

Mercy, Annulments & Matrimony [Unam Sanctam Catholicam]

Some reflections on the current state of things vis-a-vis matrimony, annulments, and mercy.

1. There has been a lot of talk about making sure the annulment process is merciful and compassionate. When people use this sort of language, they demonstrate that they do not understand what the annulment process is all about. The annulment process is primarily investigative; its purpose is to determine whether or not a putative marriage bond is valid or not. It has to do with research and investigation into the historical facts in a particular case. "Mercy" and "compassion" by their nature have nothing to do with such an investigative process. To say such a process should be "merciful" or "compassionate" is like suggesting an archaeologist needs to be more merciful when he is trying to figure out if there are ancient skeletons buried beneath a parking lot, or that a coroner doing an autopsy needs to incorporate compassion into his findings. If we told the archaeologist or the coroner this, they would rightfully look askance and wonder in what sense mercy was even relevant to their investigation. Investigation is about simply uncovering facts, and just as mercy and compassion are irrelevant to the facts of a scientific investigation, so they are irrelevant to the annulment process.

2. The annulment process is a legal process. Legal procedures can be just or unjust, but they cannot be merciful or unmerciful. It could be argued - because of the above point about the nature of investigative enterprises - that mercy has no place in legal proceedings. Mercy does have some place in legal proceedings when it comes to the prudence of a judge or magistrate in handing down a particular sentence. We may implore a judge to be merciful; there is a saying, to "throw oneself on the mercy of the court." But (and this is an important distinction) one is appealing for mercy regarding a sentence, not a procedural process. It is the sentence which elicits pleas for mercy, not the process of uncovering facts. A judge may be moved to mercy in issuing a sentence, but no judge would take seriously a plea that searching to uncover the facts of a case was unmerciful. So appeals to mercy are directed towards a sentence, not a process.

Furthermore, we appeal to mercy from persons, not procedures. A procedure can be more or less just, granted; but we do not make judgments about whether a system of procedures is merciful. Mercy is a moral act and can only be granted by a person, never a procedure. The talk about our annulment procedures being made more "merciful" is absurd.

3. It could be argued, of course, that an annulment is exactly that - a sentence. After all, the Tribunal issues a sentence at the end of the annulment process, and upon that sentence depends whether or not a previously contracted marriage is declared null. But the sentence is merely a sentence of fact, not a punitive sentence. The sentence is a statement that such-and-such are the facts of the case. One cannot appeal to mercy in such a judgment; it would make as little sense as saying that the judge's finding of fact that John Doe was spotted at the nightclub on the evening of July 25th is unmerciful. Facts are not merciful or unmerciful. They're just facts. And the annulment decree is a sentence of fact finding, not a punitive sentence. A person can argue that a fact is irrelevant, or needs to be understood in context, or that it is being understood errantly, but he cannot argue that a fact is unmerciful.

4. Finally, it is fascinating to me that there seems to be an eclipse of the concept of the sanctity of the marriage bond itself. For example, despite the great moral shift in the West, if you took a survey, most Americans would still say adultery or "cheating" is wrong. However, if you were to reword the survey and say, "Is it acceptable to have extramarital sex if your partner agrees to it?" we would see widespread agreement. If adultery is wrong, how could it be acceptable because a partner agrees to it? In other words, while many in the West still think adultery is wrong, they no longer understand why it is wrong. For most, adultery is wrong because it violates the trust of a spouse. This explains why so many will say it is acceptable in an "open marriage" situation or when the spouse assents to it. It is only wrong when the spouse has not consented. The betrayal of the spouse's trust is the real evil. Thus, the issue becomes whether mutual consent is violated - the Lockean libertarian principle applied to matrimony.

On the contrary, Catholic Tradition has always held that an extramarital affair is always immoral - even if the spouse consents to it - because it is an offense against the marriage bond. Of course violating trust is a bad thing, but it is not the only thing. The Catholic Tradition recognizes the marriage bond as something that exists objectively; it can be violated and sinned against by certain acts, even if both parties consent to them. But our culture no longer has any concept of an objective marriage bond; marriage is nothing other than consent - with consent, anything becomes permissible; without consent - a continuing consent - the marriage ceases to exist. Whereas Tradition sees the marriage bond as arising out of  a one-time act of consent, for the moderns the bond is nothing other than the consent itself. Thus, they do not understand why anything that is consented to can possibly be objectionable.

5. Finally, even if we could disregard all of the above and suggest that "mercy" should be applied in annulment cases, we ought to note that if "mercy" contradicts objective fact - that is, if in the name of mercy a declaration of nullity is issued that is not warranted by the objective facts of a case - well, this is not mercy; it is simply lying, which is an injustice.


We need to recognize as Christians that not only will our teachings be increasingly rejected, but they will not even be understood. When society cannot even understand that an objective marriage bond exists, the difference between a procedure and a sentence, an investigation of fact vs. a judgment, then the time has probably come to return to the deserts and lonely places and beat our breasts in prayer until renewal comes or the comes and smites the earth in flame.

11:25

Time Flies: The 33rd Sunday of OT [The Sacred Page]

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05:23

Storm Days [Korrektiv]

winslow homer

                            for my father

The wind is in rare form tonight – all in –
The pine and the walnut are sent adrift
In darkness to wave-break the night, an ocean
Of sighs that have slashed autumn’s lines and left

The summer unmoored – grief enough, father,
To see in the porch light your fading shade
That time when the talk sat with ease. Whether
The hour of that someplace translated your staid

And passing years – whiskey conversed, earnest
As lyrics, the crisscross of legacy
That made my manhood. Then you taught, honest
As wages, how jib sails are cut to see
A weather gauge measure a typhoon sea
And signal words speak a level ballast.

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The City and the World XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Daily Register XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Deacon's Bench XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Divine Lamp XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Eponymous Flower XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The hermeneutic of continuity XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Jesuit Post XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Josias XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Lepanto Institute XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Low Churchman's Guide to the Solemn High Mass XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Paraphasic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Prosblogion XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Rad Trad XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Remnant Newspaper - The Remnant Newspaper - Remnant Articles XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sacred Page XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sensible Bond XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The TOF Spot XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Theological Flint XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
totaliter aliter XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Traditional Catholic Priest XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Transalpine Redemptorists at home XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unam Sanctam Catholicam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unequally Yoked XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Voice of the Family XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vox Cantoris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vultus Christi XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Whispers in the Loggia XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Zippy Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Archives...
January 2016
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December 2015
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November 2015
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October 2015
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September 2015
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August 2015
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July 2015
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June 2015
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May 2015
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April 2015
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March 2015
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February 2015
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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02030405060708
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January 2015
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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December 2014
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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November 2014
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October 2014
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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September 2014
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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August 2014
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July 2014
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June 2014
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May 2014
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April 2014
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March 2014
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February 2014
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January 2014
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20212223242526
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December 2013
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November 2013
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October 2013
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August 2013
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July 2013
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June 2013
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May 2013
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April 2013
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March 2013
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February 2013
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January 2013
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December 2012
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November 2012
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October 2012
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September 2012
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June 2012
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May 2012
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March 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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February 2012
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December 2011
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November 2011
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July 2011
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18192021222324
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April 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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18192021222324
25262728293001
March 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
November 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
01020304050607
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15161718192021
22232425262728
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August 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
26272829303101
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16171819202122
23242526272829
30310102030405
June 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
31010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
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January 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
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December 2009
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
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21222324252627
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November 2009
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02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
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