Wednesday, 23 December

22:48

Goodill on Scholastic Metaphysics and Wittgenstein [Edward Feser]

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In the January 2016 issue of New Blackfriars, David Goodill reviews my book Scholastic Metaphysics.  From the review:

Feser[‘s]... purpose... is in bringing Scholastic metaphysics into conversation with contemporary metaphysics... The contemporary partners Feser chooses to converse with are analytical philosophers...

This engagement with contemporary philosophy ensures that the book is more than just an introduction which rehearses the arguments of others. Feser demonstrates a mastery of both the Scholastic tradition he draws upon and the writings of contemporary thinkers, which he uses to provide telling and insightful analyses of key metaphysical notions...

The value of Feser’s book is in its contribution to the[se] debates... and the analytical clarity with which he illuminates contemporary debate by using principles developed in scholastic thought.

While allowing that “inevitably with any work of such broad scope not every perspective can be included, nor can every debate be entered into,” Goodill suggests that there are two issues I might have pursued further.  First, he says:

Feser rejects Wittgenstein’s rejection of metaphysics and his return to the ordinary.  Along with this he also argues that: ‘the Scholastics would not agree that it is to “grammar” that we must look to resolve (or dissolve) metaphysical problems’ (p. 221).  Here Feser stands in opposition to those analytical philosophers who have drawn a line of continuity from Plato through the scholastics to Wittgenstein’s grammatical remarks.  Most notably, G. E. M. Anscombe draws attention to the intimate relationship in Plato between the development of metaphysics and grammar, and argues that Frege and Wittgenstein stand within this tradition.  More recently William Charlton has argued that grammar is central to metaphysics.  An engagement with such views would be helpful in substantiating Feser’s claim that grammar did not figure when the scholastics sought to resolve metaphysical questions.

This is an interesting response to my remarks in the book about Wittgenstein, and I agree that those remarks should be qualified.  So let me do so here.

“Grammar,” in the technical Wittgensteinian sense, has to do with those implicit rules of language which determine the bounds of meaningful usage.  These rules are normative rather than merely descriptive, and a proposition which expresses a rule is therefore to be distinguished from an empirical proposition.  The proposition that stones are material objects would be a “grammatical” proposition in this sense, whereas the proposition that stones can be found in riverbeds would be an empirical proposition.  To deny that stones can be found in riverbeds would be to say something false, but it would nevertheless be to say something perfectly intelligible, something which could have been true.  But to deny that stones are material objects would, in Wittgenstein’s view, not be intelligible.  It would be nonsensical, insofar as the proposition that stones are material objectsis for him partially constitutive of the proper use of the term “stone.”  We know that stones are material objects, not by virtue of empirical investigation (as with the proposition that stones can be found in riverbeds) but rather just by virtue of mastering the use of the word “stone.” 

“Grammatical” rules in this sense are thus like the rules of a game.  To say, in the context of a game of checkers, that a game piece with another stacked on top of it is a King is to give expression to one of the rules of the game.  It is not like saying that player A’s King is on a red square.  Falsely to say the latter (when the King is actually on a black square, say) is to make an empirical mistake.  But to deny that a game piece with another stacked on top of it is a King is not to make an empirical mistake.  It is simply to misunderstand what checkers involves. 

Now, for Wittgenstein, a metaphysical theory like Berkeley’s idealism is like that.  When Berkeley denies that a stone is a material object and says that it is actually a collection of perceptions, he is, in Wittgenstein’s view, making a “grammatical” error.  He is like someone who denies that a checkers game piece with another stacked on top of it is a King.  “Grammar” in the sense of the study of the constitutive rules of language can for the Wittgensteinian thus help us to expose the errors made by bad metaphysical theories.  As Wittgenstein says, “essence is expressed by grammar” and “grammar tells what kind of object anything is” (Philosophical Investigations §§371, 373).

There are at least three ways to read what Wittgenstein is up to here, which I will call the anti-realist, realist, and neither anti-realist nor realistreadings.  They can be described as follows:

1. Anti-realist: On this reading, Wittgensteinian “grammar” merely describes how we happen linguistically and conceptually to “carve up” reality.  In principle, though, we might carve it up in some radically different way.  “Grammar” captures necessary features of reality only in the sense that, giventhe language and conceptual scheme we happen to have, certain ways of describing things are ruled out as nonsensical.  However, our language and conceptual scheme as a whole is contingent, and could in theory be replaced by some alternative and incommensurable language and conceptual scheme.

2. Realist: On this reading, Wittgensteinian “grammar” captures not merely how we happen, contingently, to “carve up” reality, but how reality itself must be.  It tells us not just what is necessarily the case given our conceptual scheme, but what is necessarily the case full stop.  We cannot so much as even make sense of the idea of a radically different and incommensurable conceptual scheme, because we cannot so much as make sense of reality being any different than the rules of “grammar” tell us it is.

3. Neither anti-realist nor realist: On this reading, the anti-realist and realist readings of Wittgenstein are themselves precisely instances of the sort of thing Wittgenstein is trying to overcome.  For both involve a dualism of language and conceptual scheme on the one hand and reality on the other, and disagree merely about whether the former corresponds necessarily to the latter.  But this kind of metaphysical picture is itself a product of what Wittgenstein would regard as “grammatical” confusion.  In our ordinary linguistic usage and “form of life,” the question of whether language and conceptual scheme as a whole “correspond” to reality doesn’t even arise.  Wittgensteinian philosophy is about getting us back to this state of pre-metaphysical innocence (as it were), and not about taking sides on any version of the metaphysical realist/anti-realist dispute.

Now, people who think that Wittgenstein is a kind of relativist, or that his criticisms of various metaphysical theories are a matter of “conceptual analysis” which takes for granted mere “folk” notions which might end up being overthrown by science, are adopting interpretation 1.  But this interpretation, I would say, badly misreads Wittgenstein, and I think most Wittgensteinians would agree that it badly misreads him.

In fact, I think that Wittgenstein and most of his followers intend interpretation 3.  In my view, though, the trouble with interpretation 3 -- or to be more precise, with the position that interpretation 3 rightly attributes to Wittgenstein --  is that it is unstable and tends to collapse into either the position described by interpretation 1 or the position described by interpretation 2.  There is just no such thing as returning to a state of pre-metaphysical innocence (short of a lobotomy, anyway) because metaphysical speculation is not some pathology that arises when language “goes on holiday,” but is rather the natural manifestation of our essence as rational animals.  Give man sufficient time and leisure, and he will become a metaphysician.  The only question is whether he will do it well or badly.

If there is any value in Wittgenstein’s “grammatical” investigations, then -- and I certainly think there is -- then they will in my view have to be construed in terms of interpretation 2.  Now, again, there are good ways and bad ways of doing metaphysics.  I would say that what Wittgenstein was primarily reacting against were some bad ways -- namely, the ways represented by continental rationalist metaphysics, “naturalized” metaphysics of the sort inspired by British empiricism, idealism, Kantianism, etc. -- and that he mistook them for metaphysics as such.  But all these approaches, which share certain key post-Cartesian assumptions, differ greatly from the classical approaches represented by Platonism, Aristotelianism, and the Scholastic thinkers who built on those traditions.

Aristotelianism in particular (and systems which incorporate it, like Thomism) take there to be a profound continuity between common sense and metaphysical speculation.  Metaphysics goes well beyond common sense but it does not subvert it, at least not in any radical way.  This continuity puts Aristotelian metaphysics much closer to Wittgenstein and his concern for ordinary language and the “form of life” it represents than other metaphysical systems are.  Because of this closeness, I think that Aristotelians and Thomists are bound to find useful insights in Wittgenstein and his followers, and that Wittgensteinians are bound to find the work of Aristotelians and Thomists more congenial than that of other metaphysicians.  It is unsurprising, then, that there are thinkers who have drawn inspiration from both traditions (e.g. Anscombe, Anthony Kenny, P.M.S. Hacker).

Now, when I said what I did in Scholastic Metaphysics about Wittgenstein, I had interpretation 3 in mind.  And since that section of the book was not about Wittgenstein per sebut rather about defending Scholastic metaphysics against a certain kind of objection, those remarks sufficed for my purposes.  But they certainly don’t represent the entirety of my views about Wittgenstein, and Goodill is correct that it would be quite wrong to claim that Wittgenstein has nothing to offer the Scholastic. 

Finally, Goodill also writes:

Furthermore, although this is a work in metaphysics, some account of the relationship between metaphysics and logic in scholastic thought would both aid this dialogue and enable the reader to grasp something of the subtlety of the distinctions drawn by the scholastics.

Here too I agree with Goodill.  I do briefly touch on such matters at the end of the book, where I discuss analogy, but much more could be said.  Doing so, however, would require treatment of issues in philosophy of language and logic that would go far beyond the aims I had in mind in writing the book; indeed, it would require a book of its own.

There are several issues here to be disentangled.  First there is the general question of the relationship between modern logic and the traditional logic presupposed by older Scholastic writers.  Writers of an earlier generation such as Henry Veatch had something to say about this, but the subject really needs an up-to-date Aristotelian-Thomistic treatment that engages in depth with contemporary analytic philosophy.  (David Oderberg has made a start in his anthology on logician Fred Sommers.)

Second, there is the gigantic topic of Aquinas’s position on the analogical use of language -- how properly to understand it (a matter of dispute among Thomists), the critiques by Scotists and others, and how all this relates to work in contemporary philosophy of language.  Important work on these issues has been done by writers like Joshua Hochschild.

Third, there is the question of how specific Scholastic ideas and arguments in metaphysics reflect distinctive logico-linguistic assumptions.  Gyula Klima has perhaps written more on this subject than any other contemporary philosopher.

What is really needed, though, is book-length work that ties all this together in a systematic way.

21:03

Some Remarks on Trullo in the Catholic Church [Opus Publicum]

In my earlier post, “Edwards Peters Contra the East,” I incorporated some critical remarks concerning Peters’s dismissal of the 692 A.D. Council in Trullo (otherwise known as the Quinisext Council or Penthekte Synod). It is commonplace for Latin Catholics dismissive of the Eastern practice of married clergy without the requirement of perpetual continence to claim, on the one hand, that Trullo introduced innovations into the (Eastern) Church and, on the other, has no standing in the Catholic Church. Indeed, it is not difficult to find popular and academic pieces written from a Latin perspective which dismiss Trullo tout court. This picture is not altogether accurate, as detailed in Fr. Frederick R. McManus’s article, “The Council in Trullo: A Roman Catholic Perspective,” 40 Greek Orthodox Theological Review 79 (1995). Without claiming to summarize all of the article’s contents, allow me to mention a few highlights:

  • Although the disciplinary canons promulgated at Trullo were immediately rejected by Pope Sergius I at the close of the seventh century, John VIII, in the ninth century (if not also his predecessor Pope Constantine in the eighth century), accepted those canons which did not contradict the usages and disciplines of the See of Rome. At the heart of Rome’s initial rejection of Trullo was its pretense of defining disciplines and practices for the universal Church, ones which would have contracted longstanding Latin usage (e.g., Lenten fast on Saturdays and mandatory celibacy for deacons and presbyters).
  • Numerous sources throughout the medieval period indicate that that Rome recognized that Trullo was binding law for the Greeks (i.e., Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholics who follow the Byzantine Rite) even though it had no binding status for Latin Catholics.
  • Critical editions of the canons of Trullo — in Latin and Greek — were published first under Blessed Pope Pius IX and, second, under Popes Pius XI and XII when sources were being assembled for what would eventually become the Code of Canons for the Eastern Churches.
  • Although the 1990 Code of Canons for the Eastern Churches leaves much to be desired in both substance and form, the manner of its promulgation is noteworthy. In his Apostolic constitution Sacri Canones, John Paul II explicitly recognizes the legitimacy of the Eastern canonical tradition, including Trullo.

These observations do not obviate the fact that Latin Catholics will likely continue to raise the false flag that Trullo’s canons concerning priestly celibacy are “an innovation” or that celibate priesthood is ipso facto superior to the married priesthood. Let me close with a reminder that that the crisis of Christianity in modern times — one which can be found in the East and the West — will not be remedied through petty polemics, triumphalism, insult, creative history, or chauvinism. The ancient Latin Catholic discipline of clerical celibacy — in my humble opinion — ought to be respected and retained, and no Easterner — Catholic, Orthodox, or Oriental — should cast aspersions upon it. Perhaps it would be good if, at some point in the future, Eastern Christians take time to reflect more deeply on the unique spiritual and practical benefits of clerical celibacy in the light of their own tradition. Eastern Christendom’s great monastic culture would never have been possible without the discipline of celibacy, nor, in the Catholic context, would the missionary work of the Redemptorists in Ukraine have been possible either. Catholics everywhere should give thanks to God for the gift of the priesthood and pray that more men take up this vocation, married or celibate.


Filed under: Eastern Catholicism, Eastern Orthodox Church, Law

20:51

19:47

The Readings for Christmas (Vigil, Midn't, Dawn, Day) [The Sacred Page]

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19:00

Holy Men on the Holy Mountain [Eastern Christian Books]

I have over the years drawn attention to various books and videos about Mount Athos. To that growing list we will, next year, have to add another volume published by the most prestigious centre for Byzantine studies in North America. Forthcoming in April 2016 is a newly edited and translated collection: Alexander Alexakis, ed., and R.P.H. Greenfield et al. trans., Holy Men of Mount Athos (Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, 2016),740pp.

About this book we are told:
Often simply called the Holy Mountain, Mount Athos was the most famous center of Byzantine monasticism and remains the spiritual heart of the Orthodox Church today. This volume presents the Lives of Euthymios the Younger, Athanasios of Athos, Maximos the Hutburner, Niphon of Athos, and Philotheos. These five holy men lived on Mount Athos at different times from its early years as a monastic locale in the ninth century to the last decades of the Byzantine period in the early fifteenth century. All five were celebrated for asceticism, clairvoyance, and, in most cases, the ability to perform miracles; Euthymios and Athanasios were also famed as founders of monasteries.

Holy Men of Mount Athos illuminates both the history and the varieties of monastic practice on Athos, individually by hermits as well as communally in large monasteries. The Lives also demonstrate the diversity of hagiographic composition and provide important glimpses of Byzantine social and political history.

All the Lives in this volume are presented for the first time in English translation, together with authoritative editions of their Greek texts.

But if you can't wait until 2016, here is another study already in print, released earlier this year under the editorship of the well-known Orthodox Metropolitan and scholar Kallistos Ware with Graham Speake: Spiritual Guidance on Mount Athos (Peter Lang, 2015), 157pp.


About this book we are told:
Spiritual guidance is the serious business of Mount Athos, the principal service that the Fathers offer to each other and to the world. Athonites have been purveyors of spiritual guidance for more than a thousand years in a tradition that goes back to the fourth-century desert fathers. The recent monastic renewal on the Mountain is testimony to the Fathers’ continuing power to attract disciples and pilgrims to listen to what they have to say. The papers included in this volume examine some of the many aspects of this venerable tradition, as it has developed on Mount Athos, and as it has devolved upon monks and nuns, spiritual fathers and confessors, lay men and women, in other parts of Greece and in the world. Most of the papers were originally delivered at a conference convened by the Friends of Mount Athos at Madingley Hall, Cambridge, in 2013.

18:44

Open the Doors of Mercy! [The Rad Trad]

As an unfortunate followup to our earlier photo series on the St. Francis de Sales Oratory in St. Louis, Missouri, we note that one of the hand-carved confessional doors has been stolen.

KMOV.com

If this were an average diocesan parish, the priest would probably shrug, place a tarp over the doorframe, and move on. Then again, if this were an average parish, nobody would have bothered to steal the door in the first place.

(Thanks to Saint Louis Catholic)

17:45

A philosophical, theological, political ramble [Καθολικός διάκονος]

It is something of an end-of-the-year tradition here on Καθολικός διάκονος to post an overarching philosophical-theological-political piece. This year's post was prompted by an article on The Atlantic's website: "Obama and the Wrong Side of History." I highly recommend reading the piece in its entirety. This post is not an effort to summarize the piece. I simply offer an inevitably incomplete and admittedly somewhat rambling reflection on the subject. What gave rise to my reflection is this from the article: "The problem with this kind of thinking [being on the right or wrong side of history] is that it imputes agency to history that doesn't exist." President Obama is not the only U.S. president who has believed in what is often termed "the Whig view of history," which is the belief that history=progress. That anyone, believer or unbeliever, could subscribe to such historical optimism in light of the twentieth century utterly baffles me.

As a Christian I don't believe history, understood as an impersonal, cosmic force, has any agency of its own. However, I do believe in God's providential involvement in the world. To attribute any deliberative agency to history as such strikes me as an echo of Marx's material dialectic, which arose from Hegel, and so is the result of the so-called Enlightenment. It seems to me that the Enlightenment is now bending back on itself, thus giving rise to a new dark age. Indicative of this new dark age is the rise of the superstitious fatalism so prevalent in the West today, which takes the form of materialistic determinism. The best example of this is the widespread belief in scientism, which belief requires a leap of faith utterly divorced from reason (stay tuned for my Christmas homily late tomorrow night for more on this). Because I believe God guides (for lack of a better term) history in a deeply mysterious, mostly unfathomable, and always unexpected way, I believe there is a right and wrong side. I think where the Church is at today in terms of worldly influence, which influence, I think, will further diminish, is providential and will actually further the reign of God in advance of the end of history.

Even though I have some philosophical qualms with his reliance on Jamesian pragmatism, I embrace Addison Hodges Hart's thesis, set forth in his very worthwhile book Strangers and Pilgrims Once More: More: Being Disciples of Jesus in a Post-Christendom World. To state my objection in an admittedly ham-fisted way, pragmatism as applied to religious belief by William James tends to avoid questions of true and false. This avoidance presents issues vis-à-vis Christianity; the most historical of the world's religions (I tend towards phenomenology with a Wittgenstinian twist). With Hart, I think that even if Christendom could be restored (a dubious proposition), it would not be for the best, as difficult and painful as witnessing its demise is for me. In the end, far from alarming us, the dismantling of Christendom should be an encouragement to Christians. Kierkegaard was right about this. In the words of REM, "It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine."

For those of us in the U.S., despite the woeful laments of the culture warriors and contra much of Western Europe, our country was deliberately conceived as not a Christian nation, but as precisely the antithesis of such, even if our founders maintained an ambiguous, deistic insistence on the transcendence of the human person. This led to the creation of a constitutional system that reflects this ambiguity, the implications of which are becoming clearer, especially after last summer's Obergefell ruling by SCOTUS. One could make a compelling argument that the majority's opinion in Obergefell, which many found so inspiring, is the predictable impact point of this (il)logical trajectory. All of this is a pretty big admission for someone like me, whose religious upbringing quite explicitly sought to imbue in me a belief that the U.S. constitution is divinely inspired. For what it's worth, from the age I cared about these things, I never believed that was true, but is self-evidently false, like the religion itself (Thought experiment: apply Jamesian pragmatism to Mormonism).

I also believe the "arc of history," to employ Obama's cherished phrase, which is largely determined by worldly powers, tends to arc towards the wrong side of history with very few exceptions. Even the exceptions tend become exaggerated over time, becoming unmoored from what is good and true, quite frequently leading to what I can only describe as illiberal liberalism. At least on my reading, a political study of the Hebrew Scriptures (i.e., the "Old Testament") reveals this. The books of Chronicles, which positively embraces temple cult and monarchy, is the exception to this, standing in contrast to the history presented in 1-2 Samuel and 1-2 Kings, the latter of which prevails in the subsequent history of Israel, which culminated with the descendent of David appearing as the most unassuming king imaginable, leading to His rejection by His own (see John 1:11).

Perhaps the easiest way to determine if you're on the wrong side of history is to see if you're with the majority. Stated more succinctly, vox populi, far from being vox Dei, often (usually, if only eventually?) turns into vox diaboli. It bears noting that being in the minority in and of itself is no guarantee of being on the right side of history, which is far more difficult to discern than discerning whether you're on the wrong side. Not only in the end, but right now, neither history nor politics will save you. Political messiahs are ALWAYS false messiahs.

As he does so well because he does it with such charity, Rowan Williams, in his Christmas message for Christian Aid, as well as in his remarkable book, Resurrection: Interpreting the Easter Gospel, makes the point that, ultimately, the winners are history's losers. He does it in a far more convincing manner than I ever could:


17:09

The London Times goes mad [Laodicea]

The London Times is visibly descending into insanity. The principal article in it today, by the columnist Daniel Finkelstein, argues that while people should be arrested for public nudity at the moment because it is against the law, nevertheless people have been getting used to increasing degrees of undress over the last century, and a day will come when people will be ready for complete public nudity, which will then become the law, and that will be no problem, you see, because it will be the law.

Not infrequently, too, God, in order to chastise their pride, does not permit men to see the truth, and thus they are punished in the things wherein they sin. This is why we often see men of great intellectual power and erudition making the grossest blunders even in natural knowledge (‘Tametsi’, Leo XIII, no. 9).


17:00

Christmas Recess [LMS Chairman]

A very happy and holy Christmas to all my readers!

IMG_1053
From the All Saints Convent, Oxford, currently occupied by the Conventual Franciscans.

Support the work of the LMS by becoming an 'Anniversary Supporter'.

13:12

Evolution of Comic Species [The TOF Spot]


Something about Classic ID and Classic Dilbert, should you find them on the Web. The drawing are sketchier, but the humor is edgier.

Compare the king in an old strip:
to the king in the new:
He's gotten fatter, his nose is bigger, his crown is smaller.

Something similar happened to Dilbert. Originally, he (and the pointy-haired boss) looked like
That is, he had a longer head, an iconic curled tie, and when standing was tall with long legs. PHB was short out of proportion, not much skull. In the earliest strips, he was even sketchier. Now they look like this:
Now they are the same height, Dilbert's head has become shorter, the boss' head has become normally proportioned, the pointy hair is more stylized. And no one wears ties anymore. The strip had been trending toward cartoons over caricatures. We seldom see anymore Bob the Dinosaur that lives in his basement or even the genius garbage collector and the other outre characters that once inhabited the strip. 

There is only one thing that can account for these differences: the Theory of Comic Change.

09:27

Christmas Latin Mass Schedule – St. Therese Chapel, Chico CA [New Sherwood]

StThereseChapel

The Traditional Latin Mass will be offered at 3:00pm on Christmas Day at St. Therese Chapel in Chico, California. The celebrant will be Fr. William Kimball, SSPX. St. Therese Chapel is located at 367 E. 8th Avenue Chico, CA 95926, at the corner of E. 8th and Spruce Avenues. The ordinary Mass schedule is 3:00pm on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of every month. Confessions are 30 minutes before every Mass.


08:20

Christ Cathedral, Diocese of Orange, has its first director of music ministries. [Catholic Sacristan]

The Diocese of Orange, specifically Christ Cathedral, has selected its first director of music.

It looks like the music ministry of Christ Cathedral will be in good hands. Let us pray that Dr. Romeri's leadership will affirm truly sacred music for the Divine Liturgy and that he will attract and/or retain dedicated choristers who will serve the Lord and His Church with selfless zeal and joy-filled passion for orthodoxy.

May the Lord grant Dr. Romeri and his associates the grace they need to fulfill their roles as faithful servants of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Congratulations to Dr. Romeri!
OC Catholic
December 22, 2015
Internationally respected liturgical music director and organist John A. Romeri will lead burgeoning music ministry.
Garden Grove, CA (Dec. 8, 2015) – After extensive study, discernment, and reflection regarding the unique and dynamic needs of the developing music ministry of Christ Cathedral and the scope of responsibilities and key attributes that a future leader of this program should possess, the Most Reverend Kevin Vann, Bishop of Orange has selected Dr. John A Romeri, former Director of Liturgical Music for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, as the first Christ Cathedral Director of Music Ministries. Dr. Romeri will lead the development of not only the Christ Cathedral Parish’s music program but also the liturgical music program that will support major diocesan celebrations that will take place within the inspiring edifice of the Christ Cathedral after its renovation and dedication. Dr. Romeri will begin his work at Christ Cathedral January 19, 2016.
Full article at OC Catholic: CLICK HERE
Excerpted and summarized from OC Catholic [source/link]:
Dr. John A. Romeri 
Prior Experience
September 2010 until September 2015
  • Dr. John A. Romeri served as Director of Liturgical Music for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
  • Director of Music and Organist at the Cathedral Basilica of SS Peter and Paul.
  • Conductor: Cathedral Basilica Choir.
  • Reestablished the Archdiocesan Choir of Philadelphia.
  • Founder: Archdiocesan Girls’ Choir.
  • created Concerts at the Cathedral Basilica and served as its Artistic and Executive Director.
1992 – 2010
Training 
  • Bachelor of Music degree in Organ Performance, Magna cum Laude, from the Conservatory of Music, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California.
  • Master of Sacred Music degree from Westminster Choir College, Princeton, New Jersey.
  • Choirmaster and Associate Certificates from the American Guild of Organists
  • In 1998, he was presented an Honorary Doctorate in Humane Letters from Lindenwood University in Saint Louis.
Professional Associations & Awards
  • Chair of the National Association of Pastoral Musicians’ National Board of Directors and was named “Pastoral Musician of the Year” by that organization in 2003. 
  • Missouri Choral Directors Association: Outstanding Choir Director for 1998-1999 .
  • 1999: Coordinator and conductor for the papal visit to St. Louis. 
  • Past Dean of the Saint Louis Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. 
  • Immediate past Vice-President of the National Board of Directors of the International Student Choral Organization of the Catholic Church, Pueri Cantores. 
  • 2010: Saint Louis Chapter of the American Guild of Organists: Avis Blewett Award for significant contributions to the musical life of the Greater Metropolitan Saint Louis Region: Dr. Romeri and his wife Karen.
  • Dean of the Philadelphia Chapter of the AGO. 
  • Liturgy Committee of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C. 
  • May 2015, received the Westminster Choir College Alumni Merit Award for “distinguished contributions to the Field of Sacred Music.”

06:00

O Emmanuel [The Rad Trad]



O Emmanuel, Rex et Legifer noster, exspectatio gentium, et salvator earum; veni ad salvandum nos, Domine Deus noster.O Emmanuel, our King and Lawgiver, the Expectation and Saviour of the nations! come and save us, O Lord our God! 
O Emmanuel! King of Peace! thou enterest to-day the city of thy predilection, the city in which thou hast placed thy Temple, - Jerusalem. A few years hence, and the same city will give thee thy Cross and thy Sepulchre: nay, the day will come, on which thou wilt set up thy Judgment-seat within sight of her walls. But, to-day, thou enterest the city of David and Solomon unnoticed and unknown. It lies on thy road to Bethlehem. Thy Blessed Mother and Joseph, her Spouse, would not lose the opportunity of visiting the Temple, there to offer to the Lord their prayers and adoration. They enter; and then, for the first time, is accomplished the prophecy of Aggeus, that great shall be the glory of this last House more than of the first [Agg. ii. 10.] ; for this second Temple has now standing within it an Ark of the Covenant more precious than was that which Moses built; and within this Ark, which is Mary, there is contained the God, whose presence makes her the holiest of sanctuaries. The Lawgiver himself is in this blessed Ark, and not merely, as in that of old, the tablet of stone on which the Law was graven. The visit paid, our living Ark descends the steps of the Temple, and sets out once more for Bethlehem, where other prophecies are to be fulfilled. We adore thee, O Emmanuel! in this thy journey, and we reverence the fidelity wherewith thou fulfillest all that the prophets have written of thee, for thou wouldst give to thy people the certainty of thy being the Messias, by showing them, that all the marks, whereby he was to be known, are to be found in thee. And now, the hour is near; all is ready for thy Birth; come, then, and save us; come, that thou mayest not only be called our Emmanuel, but our Jesus, that is, He that saves us. 
From The Liturgical Year by Dom Gueranger 

05:17

What the Popes Don’t Say About Islam [Ethika Politika]

millls6

The politician who declares Islam a “religion of peace” almost certainly has no idea what he’s talking about. He makes the claim assuming that some Americans await the excuse to release their inner Islamophobe, which though true doesn’t settle the vexing question of what Islam is and where its beliefs lead. The popes have not been as helpful in answering the question as they might have been. Genuine Religions Most westerners assume that all religions are basically alike, not just in being oriented to the divine but in what they think that divine requires. (See here for more on this.) We take Christianity, and to a great extent Judaism, as the template. As Pope Benedict told Muslims in Cameroon in 2009, “genuine religion”
widens the horizon of human understanding and stands at the base of any authentically human culture. It rejects all forms of violence and totalitarianism: not only on principles of faith, but also of right reason. Indeed, religion and reason mutually reinforce one another since religion is purified and structured by reason, and reason's full potential is unleashed by revelation and faith.
This describes Christianity, the religion we know, but whether it describes other religions is a question. We believe in this idea of genuine religion because we believe that God has told us certain truths through his Scriptures and his Church. Those who believe he has said other things through other sources—Muhammad would be one—may wind up with very different beliefs. They may reject the idea that reason purifies and structures religion, for example. One legitimate response to Benedict’s definition is that if this is genuine religion, Islam is not a genuine religion. A religion might assert dogmas that lead to violence, oppression, hatred, or an unjust social order. A religion may be a crazy religion. That Islam is a religion does not mean that it is a faith and life that recognizes human dignity and leads to human flourishing. It may do so imperfectly, partly, or not at all. If it does so, it may do so for some but not everyone, for the insiders but not the outsiders. The Second Vatican Council gave us in Nostra Aetate an optimistic description of Islam that does not answer concretely the question of what it believes and where those beliefs go. Indeed that section of the declaration begins “The Church regards with esteem also the Moslems,” not Islam. “They adore the one God, living and subsisting in Himself,” it says, but someone might adore the one God and mishear most of what he’s said. Islam and the Christian Template Here—I don’t say this happily—the prudential judgments of recent popes seem to me over-optimistically to reflect the assumption that Islam is a religion fitting the Christian template. That is, at least, the natural reading. I will take Benedict as my example because he observed more of recent history than St. John Paul II and is less controversial (to some) than Francis, and because he has a mind of astonishing penetration and subtlety. Here are a few examples, taken (as was the quote above) from the USCCB’s helpful collection of statements on Islam. “Since the Second Vatican Council,” Benedict told the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue in 2008, “attention has been focused on the spiritual elements which different religious traditions have in common. In many ways, this has helped to build bridges of understanding across religious boundaries.” He said that working together lets the different religions—including Islam—express their “highest ideals,” mentioning “helping the sick, bringing relief to the victims of natural disasters or violence, [and] caring for the aged and the poor.” Benedict uses “highest” in the Christian sense. What if for Islam these are not its highest ideals or are only among its highest ideals? What if its highest ideals include the spread of Islam throughout the world, if necessary through forcible conversion and the oppression or killing of infidels and apostates? Suppose its highest ideals include the kind of sexually segregated society we see in Saudi Arabia? Benedict’s Call In a message to Muslims at the beginning of Ramadan in 2006, the pope called them to defend and promote “the dignity of the human person and of the rights ensuing from that dignity. . . . [B]y recognizing the central character of the human person and by working with perseverance to see that human life is always respected, Christians and Muslims manifest their obedience to the Creator, who wishes all people to live in the dignity that he has bestowed upon them.” In another address to Muslims, he said that in pluralistic societies, “care must be taken to guarantee that the other is always treated with respect.” This respect
grows only on the basis of agreement on certain inalienable values that are proper to human nature, in particular the inviolable dignity of every single person as created by God. Such agreement does not limit the expression of individual religions; on the contrary, it allows each person to bear witness explicitly to what he believes, not avoiding comparison with other
What if Islam doesn’t recognize what as a Catholic Benedict sees as “the central character of the human person” and “the inviolable dignity of every single person”? The way Benedict puts this suggests that he is not sure they do, but the average reader will take the words as a statement that they believe this, just like Christians and Jews. Benedict’s other remarks are of the same sort with the same apparent meaning. He doesn’t define Islam and much of what he says consists of appeals to Muslims to act like Christians without actually saying so. The effect is to present Islam as a religion understood through the Christian template, and not to consider whether its beliefs direct it to peace or to war, to freedom or to slavery, to equality or to oppression. What Islam Is Islam is the religion we need to understand at the moment. Some Muslims kill innocent people and a greater number wish innocent people to be killed. They’re also the religious group most likely to suffer harassment and abuse and to find themselves the targets of louts, fools, and demagogues (and demagogues who are also louts and fools). Is Islam capable of growth into a modern universalistic religion like Christianity that respects the dignity and freedom of every human person in a pluralistic society? Or isn’t it? Or is substnatially shaped by the society in which it finds itself? Are Islamist terrorists the Muslim equivalent of the Christian inquisitors of the past, something the religion will outgrow, or are they something the religion itself creates? Are they are a perversion or a product of the religion? Are they in its DNA or are they a mutation that can’t long survive? Can it develop? Will it be universalized by modernity or directed by the natural law? I don’t know the answer to these questions. I don’t have even enough knowledge to venture a very amateur opinion, and people I trust disagree on the matter. I’m not even sure how authoritative is what seems to me the papal assumption, since as far as I can find we have no Magisterial statement on the nature of Islam. But it’s a question that must be asked, difficult though the answer may be. Further Reading: The Second Vatican Council’s Nostra Aetate Benedict XVI’s Faith, Reason, and the University (his “Regensburg Lecture”) The USCCB’s Vatican Council and Papal Statements on Islam David Mills’ One Religion’s As Bad As Another Pater Edmund Waldstein’s Fiction, or the Future of France? John M. Owen IV and J. Judd Owen’s The Truth About an Islamic Enlightenment Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig’s Christians, Campaigns, and Collateral Damage Robert P. George’s Muslims, Our Natural Allies

The post What the Popes Don’t Say About Islam appeared first on Ethika Politika.

04:45

Doesn't Chesterton say somewhere... [marcpuck]

Something to the effect, 'men, having rejected belief in God, will believe in anything'-- there is a significant clause I'm sure I'm forgetting: but it's what I thought of when I saw this in the Guardian: the Antiquities Authority in Israel couldn't figure out what the gold-colored rolling pin-like thing was only to have someone via Facebook inform them that it's a utensil for naturopaths to channel their imaginary energies. Good Lord! perhaps it's just a lot of nonsense that one of the weaker minds at the newspaper let get into print/on to the website.

Evidently, there is uncertainty about the Chesterton, ahem; 'the first effect of not believing in God is to believe in anything'.

04:31

Capitalism [The Paraphasic]


I should begin by reviewing my qualifications to discuss this topic.  I have no background in finance or economics.  Those who read this blog know that my background is in philosophy and theology, specifically Thomist theology.  Nevertheless, being an educated citizen of the United States who has read a little bit of political philosophy and discussed these things more than a little bit, I'd like to devote some time to thinking about Capitalism: what it is, how it should be understood, and how it can or should be practiced.

1.  It seems clear that the "obvious" definition of Capitalism in the air (i.e. the one which occurs most readily) is something like this: Capitalism is a model of commercial activity in which the maximization of profits is pursued as the primary (or even exclusive) end of business.

2.  I have described Capitalism as a "model", instead of calling it a method or philosophy.  Capitalism, under this definition, is not a set of procedural rules which dictate behavior, nor is it a set of metaphysical propositions.  Instead it is a way of understanding or imagining a set of contexts, objects, and behaviors.  It's a practical lens through which commercial activity is viewed, which filters out the elements extraneous to the model.

3.  Capitalism is a self-limiting practical model.  It covers only a single domain of behavior — commercial activity, the exchange of products and services on the basis of a strict agreement (rather than on the basis of friendship or community trust).

4.  Capitalism is not a philosophical system (though Ayn Rand has developed a philosophical system based on capitalist tendencies), in that it has nothing to say about moral questions, or the constitution of the real, or the nature of human understanding.  If one wants to use the Kantian jargon, we could say that Capitalism is based on the hypothetical imperative: If one engages in commercial activity, one ought to maximize profits. 

5.  What are "profits"?  The notions of "profit" and "capital" are central to Capitalism.  A profit is the value gained through some commercial activity (whether a trade or an investment) over and above the amount of value expended on the activity.  What is Capital?  The notion of capital is based on the recognition that the exchange value of a commodity depends on the extent to which it is desired by people who are available to trade for it.  Capital is, in the most general sense of the word, the assets controlled by a particular person (or group), understood solely in terms of their exchange value.

6.  This enables us to restate our original definition in different terms: Capitalism is a model of commercial activity in which we attempt, through labor, exchange, and other means, to maximize our assets, considered in terms of their exchange value, and pursue this maximization as the primary or even exclusive end of commerce.

7.  In the United States, since the outbreak of the Cold War, Capitalism has been frequently contrasted with "Socialism" or "Communism".  It is often true that the meaning of a given term changes when it is placed in opposition to another term, and this is certainly one of those cases.  When one speaks of "Capitalism vs. Socialism", usually the disjunction has little to do with the understanding of Capitalism we have described so far.  Socialism is not a model of commercial activity but has to do with the distribution of ownership.  "Capitalism vs. Socialism" is a dispute about the best way to organize the distribution of ownership in society, not about the proper dominant model for commercial activities, though the two issues are related.  (The difference in meaning between Capitalism in this case and Capitalism considered in itself can lead to confusion and equivocation.)

8.  Capitalism and the Capitalist.  By the definitions we have given above, the Capitalist is simply an engine for profit maximization, whether he acts for his own sake or for the profit maximization of a firm.  Creativity comes for the Capitalist in the interpretation of trends and circumstances, the identification (and construction) of advantageous possibilities, and the anticipation of future outcomes.  Capitalists approach a chaotic world of resources and interests and attempt to transform it to their own advantage, whether as organizers of productive labor and resource distribution, or as conduits through which resources flow between various buyers and sellers.

9.  It is obvious that commercial activity does not occur in a vacuum, independent of other human realities.  This is most obvious because the exchange value of any commodity is ultimately derived from its impact on the ability of concrete individuals to fulfill their basic needs and aspirations, and to find enjoyment.  Frequently this fundamental fact about the exchange value of goods is obscured by the complexity of the system of exchange and the variety and abstractness of some commodities.

10.  Commercial activity is founded on human interests and on the organization of human society.  As a subset of human activity, commercial activity falls under human sociability, and like all other social behavior it is circumscribed by expectations about the justice, good-will, and truthfulness of those involved.

11. Once we realize that we can look at commercial activity within a larger context of human behavior, it becomes possible to assess it by broader standards of reasonableness than those provided by the Capitalist model.  Consider the following example.  Under Capitalism (as defined above) civil law can be thought of as a restriction on the possible means of profit maximization imposed by force, or as a regulatory stabilization of the process of exchange.  But when we look at the laws regulating commerce, considering commerce as a social behavior which occurs within stable communities whose existence is dependent on the maintenance of a fair distribution of basic resources and the promotion of the common interest, commercial regulations cease to be brute-force impositions or even merely market-stabilization strategies, but are seen rather as instruments for the guidance of one variety of human social behavior toward the benefit of the society as a whole in which that behavior occurs.

12.  There is something peculiar about Capitalism as a model of commercial activity, even considered merely as such.  Commercial activity is not, except in the most extreme cases, purely impersonal.  It involves the cultivation and maintenance of personal relationships, within a particular firm and between firms, between merchants and customers, etc.  These relationships are essential to commercial activity, not because they enhance profit-maximization (though I imagine they do), but because commercial activity cannot take place without them, and even more so because they are aspects of the higher goods to which all social activity, including commercial activity (being founded on exchange value, which is ultimately derived from human interests) is directed.

13.  Capitalism (as defined above), in other words, is a model which treats commercial activity as a non-social behavior, or as a social behavior which occurs in the absence of the broader norms and human concerns that motivate social activity and govern it in communities.  One can describe this abstraction in various ways.  David Graeber traces it to the relationship between occupying armies (who pay their debts in coins made from the spoils of war) and occupied peoples, who are required to pay taxes to the conqueror in coins he has issued.  In this relationship the norms which bind and govern communities do not exist.  The relationship backing the exchange is characterized not by friendship or goodwill, but by simple domination.

14.  The martial analogy is not entirely fair, because commercial activity according to the Capitalist model is not based (primarily) on the threat of violence so much as the manipulation of human interests.  Nevertheless, Graeber's genealogy of the modern understanding of capital is illuminating.  The transformation of Graeber's martial interpretation of Capitalism into something adequate to the realities of modern Capitalism (as defined above) is analogous to the transformation necessary to change power as it functions in Machiavelli's political vision into power as it functions in the work of Michel Foucault.  For Machiavelli, political power is primarily about military domination, the seizure and redistribution of resources, and the cultivation of an imposing image.  For Foucault, power is about facilitating the emergence of value distinctions and then participating in the organization and transformation of other elements as they flow between various poles of value.  Power is about significant differences and the organization and exploitation of tensions created by those differences.  In this way, for Foucault, power is more about exchange than domination, and more about facilitating the flow of resources than determining their global distribution.

15.  Such a vision of Capitalism is unappealing because in it the mechanics of Capitalism as a mode of action become divorced from the practical human interests which underlie all commercial behavior.  The abstraction is inhuman, and therefore to some extent divorced from reality.

16.  I began this reflection with the intention of describing an alternative model of commercial activity, closely analogous to Capitalism, but without the inhuman abstractness which is the perpetual bane of Capitalists (whose speculative activities seem to perpetually spiral into the realm of fantasy, presumably because the Capitalist model divorces the profit motive from the underlying real and human considerations of business).  Now that I have reached this point, though, it's clear that doing so would require more work than I'm ready to put into this reflection at present.  So, instead of a description, I will set down a few leading questions that seem worthy of further examination.

17.  The profit motive is, in contemporary Capitalism, the primary goal for commercial activity.  What would happen if that Capitalism were supplanted by an alternative Capitalism, in which commercial activity was motivated by the desire to maximize the productivity and social value of a particular enterprise?  How would one go about creating an honorable business culture in which such a motivation became normative, and those who pursued private profit without due consideration of social value or productivity were penalized?  What sort of education would be necessary?  Is it possible?

04:00

Homilies of the Christmas Season [Chiesa -]

From the archives of two great homilist popes, Leo the Great and Benedict XVI. With links to the Gregorian chants of this liturgical cycle

03:14

There Will Be War X [The TOF Spot]

TOF has a story in Jerry Pournelle's revivified series There Will Be War - Vol.X. The story in question is "Rules of Engagement," which ran initially in Analog (Mar. 1998) The anthology is currently available in Kindle format, but other formats will be available later.

Also in the anthology are stories, essays, and poems by Gregory Benford, Larry Niven, Ben Bova, Poul Anderson, Doug Beason, Alan Steele, et al.

Reportedly, the anthology has already earned out its advance, which is pretty good initial sales! Woo-hoo.

Teaser as follows:

Rules of Engagement
by Michael F. Flynn

Winter having locked the passes with snow and ice, the brass parceled out long-deferred leaves and junior officers scattered across the country.  Some descended on their hometowns to rest in the bosoms of their families.  Some came to the City to rest in other sorts of bosoms.  That was the last winter before the big offensive, when I still had the flat in Chelsea.  Jimmy Topeka dropped in to see me, all somber as always.  He seemed to have something on his mind, but he talked around it six ways from Sunday the way he always does and hadn’t gotten to the nub of it before Angel Osborne clumped his way up the stairs.  I hadn’t seen Angel in almost three years, though he and Jimmy had crossed paths during the Red River campaign.  I went how we lacked only Lyle “the Style” Guzman to make the old gang complete; and the Angel ups and beeps him over the Lynx and, wouldn’t you know it, Lyle was in the City, too.  So before long we were all together, just like old times, drinking and shooting the shit and waiting for the sun to come up.  Those were wild years, and we were still young enough to be immortal.

I hadn’t much in the way of furniture; and once Angel had occupied two-thirds of the sofa, there was less of it to go around.  Lyle, being slightly built, perched himself on the table, while Jimmy raided my kitchen and passed out bottles of Skull Mountain before squatting cross-legged on the floor.  We all said what a coincidence and long time no see and what’ve you been up to. 

It wasn’t quite like old times.  A few years had gone by between us.  They were long years; it didn’t seem possible they’d held only three-hundred-odd days each.  The four of us had been different places, seen different sights; and so we had become different men than the ones who had known each other at camp.  But also there was a curtain between me and the three of them.  Every now and then, in the midst of some tale or other, they would share a look; or they would fall silent and they’d say, well, you had to be there.  You see, they’d been Inside and I hadn’t, and that marks a man. 

Angel had served with the 82nd against the Snakes; and Lyle had seen action against both the Crips and the Yoopers.  Jimmy allowed as he’d tangoed in the high country, where the bandits had secret refuges among the twisting canyons; but he said very little else.  Only he drank two beers for every one the others put down, and Jimmy had never been a drinking man. 


***

01:00

Die Kartäuser-Messe [BRUNONIS]

Kartause Parkminster, England
Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Der Pater hat die Meßgewänder angezogen.
Der Wein ist in den Kelch gegossen.
Die Kartäuser-Messe beginnt.

An der Evangeliumseite unten an den Stufen des Altars steht der Priester mit seiner linken Seite dem Altare zugekehrt. Ihm gegenüber an der Epistelseite der dienende junge Bruder.
Mit lauter Stimme wird der herrliche Dialog der Vormesse gebetet:
Im Namen des Vaters, des Sohnes und des Heiligen Geistes. Amen.
P. Setze Herr eine Wache vor meinen Mund!
M. Und eine behütete Türe vor meine Lippen!
P. Ich bekenne vor Gott, der Jungfrau Maria, allen Heiligen und euch Brüdern, daß ich gar sehr gesündigt habe durch meine Schuld aus Stolz: in Gedanken, im Wort, im Werk und durch Unterlassung. Ich flehe euch an, daß ihr beten wollt für mich.
M. Es erbarme sich deiner der allmächtige Gott auf die Fürbitte der seligen Jungfrau Maria und aller Heiligen: Er erlasse dir deine Sünden und führe dich zum ewigen Leben. –

Nach dem Confiteor des Meßdieners steigt der Priester die Stufen des Altares hinan. Die eigentliche Messe beginnt jetzt, begleitet von den erhabenen Gesten orientalischer Rhythmen und Jubels.

Wie das Wasser dem Weine beigemischt wird, betet der Priester:
Aus der Seite unseres Herrn Jesus Christus floß Blut und Wasser zur Vergebung der Sünden. Im Namen des Vaters, des Sohnes und des Heiligen Geistes.

Nach der heiligen Wandlung wird die Heilige Hostie emporgehoben, nicht aber der Kelch mit dem heiligen Blut.

Beim „ite missa est“ ist die heilige Messe beendet.
Es gibt weder einen Segen, noch wird das Johannes-Evangelium zum Schluss gelesen.

So wurde die heilige Messe im Bistum Lyon im XI. Jahrhundert gefeiert, als Bruno noch lebte.

(Die Tage und Nächte in der Kartause von La Valsainte.
Pieter Van der Meer de Walcheren. Das weisse Paradies.)



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Paths of Love XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Psallam Domino XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RORATE CÆLI XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RSS XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Sancrucensis XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Scholastiker XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Semiduplex XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Siris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Spirit of Teuchtar II XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Conleth's Catholic Heritage Association XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Peter's List XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Steeple and State XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Symposium XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tęsknota XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Taylor Marshall XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tea at Trianon XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
That The Bones You Have Crushed May Thrill XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The American Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Badger Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Dormitory XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Thing XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The City and the World XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Daily Register XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Deacon's Bench XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Divine Lamp XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Eponymous Flower XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The hermeneutic of continuity XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Jesuit Post XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Josias XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Lepanto Institute XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Low Churchman's Guide to the Solemn High Mass XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Paraphasic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Prosblogion XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Rad Trad XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Remnant Newspaper - The Remnant Newspaper - Remnant Articles XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sacred Page XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sensible Bond XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The TOF Spot XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Theological Flint XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
totaliter aliter XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Traditional Catholic Priest XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Transalpine Redemptorists at home XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unam Sanctam Catholicam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unequally Yoked XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Voice of the Family XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vox Cantoris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vultus Christi XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Whispers in the Loggia XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Zippy Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
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December 2012
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December 2011
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June 2010
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December 2009
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November 2009
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