Sunday, 27 December

23:32

"For where am I to go? And by what shall I steer?" [Καθολικός διάκονος]

When they had sung many songs, and talked of many things they had done together, they toasted Bilbo's birthday, and they drank his health and Frodo's together according to Frodo's custom. Then they went out for a sniff of air, and glimpse the stars and then they went to bed. Frodo's party was over, and Gandalf had not come (The Fellowship of the Ring, Chapter III)
On leaving:
The sun went down. Bag End seemed sad and gloomy and dishevelled. Frodo wandered round the familiar rooms, and saw the light of the sunset fade on the walls, and shadows creep out of the corners. It grew slowly dark indoors, He went out and walked down to the gate at the bottom of the path, and then on a short way down the Hill Road. He half expected to see Gandalf come striding up through the dusk.



The sky was clear and the stars were growing bright. 'It's going to be a fine night,' he said aloud. 'That's good for a beginning. I feel like walking. I can't bear any more hanging about. I am going to start, and Gandalf must follow me.' He turned to go back, and then stopped... The Fellowship of the Ring, Chapter III)
At the age of 50 I am reading J.R.R. Tolkein's works for the first time. Just prior to turning 50 last month, my 10 year-old son and I finished The Hobbit and soon after began reading The Fellowship of the Ring. This afternoon we read the first half of the third chapter, "Three is Company." It's about Frodo's leaving the Shire on his ill-defined quest. I found it rather moving. What a great piece of writing!

It's weird in life that everything grows more beautiful as you prepare to leave it behind. It's like seeing it for the first time.

Said Gandalf to Frodo, "But you are leaving the Shire - and that should not be known, until you are far away. And you must go, or at least set out, either North, South, West or East - and the direction should certainly not be known." To which Frodo replies:
I have been so taken up with the thoughts of leaving Bag End, and of saying farewell, that I have never even considered the direction . . . For where am I to go? And by what shall I steer? What is to be my quest? Bilbo went to find a treasure, there and back again; but I go to lose one, and not return, as far as I can see
Because it was the Solemnity of the Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ I did not post a traditio on Friday and so I will post U2's song "Walk On," which I can easily imagine Frodo listening to on his ear buds as he walked away from the Shire that beautiful autumn night:

21:20

Go get 'em, Fr. Longenecker! It must be Christmas: Anglican minister attacks Virgin Mary. [Catholic Sacristan]

So,... this is Christmas?

During the lead up to and throughout the season of Christmas, Christians have come to expect attacks on the Faith by the usual "drive-by-media" types. However, when someone calling himself a Christian minister decides to toss grenades at the Faith of Catholics and others, well then—Houston, we have a problem.

Fr. Dwight Longenecker, Fidei Defensor, tackles the cheep provocations spewing out of the mouth of Giles Fraser, an Anglican minister, whose Christian credentials one would be right to question given his recent article in The Guardian.

Fr. Longenecker's essay begins:
Just when you thought the Anglicans couldn’t stoop much lower, in a disgusting article published, predictably, on Christmas Eve, Anglican priest-journalist Giles Fraser not only publicly denies the Virgin Birth, but he ridicules the idea, proposes that the Blessed Virgin Mary was just another teen fornicator and that it’s probably a good thing that Jesus was a bastard conceived when Mary had a romp with a Roman soldier.
I’m surprised that he didn’t title his article, “That’s Why Our Lady is a Tramp”
The crass arrogance of Fraser’s article in London’s The Guardian is only superseded by its ignorance.
My one consolation to Fr. Longenecker, though he, confident apologist that he is, has no need of such a reminder, would be that even heretics are useful. They provide us with the opportunity to clarify and defend the Catholic Faith delivered to us by the Apostles.
Read the rest of Fr. Longenecker's essay at his blog, Standing On My Head [click on article title]: Anglican Priest Smears the Virgin Mary.


Pope Francis' words come to mind:
15 January 2015 Last updated at 17:15 GMT [BBC source]

Pope Francis has defended the right to freedom of expression but has said it was wrong to provoke others by insulting their religion.

His comments followed the fatal attack on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris last week.
To illustrate his point, the pontiff told journalists on the papal plane his assistant could expect a punch if he ''cursed his mother''.
''It's normal - you cannot provoke, you cannot insult the faith of others,'' he said.
Let's be clear, the Holy Father was merely stating, in a slightly hyperbolic manner, what someone might expect from an irate person in the event of a real offence or threat. He was not condoning unjust or disproportionate retaliatory behaviour.

While Christians are never called to nor permitted to engage in irrational violence for the sake of violence, Fr. Longenecker has rightly offered Giles Fraser a corrective tap (a metaphorical upper cut?) for Fraser's attack on the Blessed Mother—our mother!
The Church's version of the Marquess of Queensberry rules, i.e., fraternal correction, rightly allows for the application of reasonable means of defence (think, e.g., just war theory). The Church understands that a rational proportionate response to any attack may be permissible in order to render an unjust attacker incapable of committing violence of one kind or another against innocent people. Likewise, the Church acknowledges the right of states to enact and enforce laws which protect the common good [CCC1897, etc.; note the principles which guide the understanding of punishment: deterrence; retributive justice; reform of the criminal; and rendering the criminal harmless.]. In other words, retributive and restorative justice—yes; retaliatory acts—no [cf. Retributive Justice and Capital Punishment by Stephen Barr/First Things [source/link].

20:26

St. John, Wine, and Celibacy [Sancrucensis]

Wine ready to be blessed Reading Sirach 31 The text of the blessing The blessing The priest's portion

The Feast of St John was somewhat eclipsed by the Feast of the Holy Family this Year, but in the parish of Pfaffstätten, which is a vineyard town, we still had the traditional blessing of wine after Mass. After the blessing it is customary for the people to give some of the wine to the priest— as a sort of offering, I believe.

During Mass I preached the following sermon (more or less).


The Gospel that we have just heard of the finding of our Lord in the temple always makes me think of something similar that happened to me when I was a child. Our Lord was twelve when his parents lost Him, but I was much younger— about four or five. We were visiting my grandparents in Salzburg, and were walking through the city on our way to Mass at the Abbey Church of St Peter. I saw something interesting in a window, and stood staring at it for a long while. When I looked up my family was gone. The Church was not far off, and when they got there (as I heard later) my father sat up front with the older children, while my mother sat in the back with my younger brother. Each of them thought that I was with the other. I wandered about looking for the church. I asked someone where St. Peter’s was, but he answered “in Rome.” It seemed to me that he had misunderstood the question, but I didn’t know how to explain this, so I walked on. I will always remember the feeling of fear and great loneliness that came over me. But my joy was proportionately great when my parents came looking for me and found me. I will never forget that joy either.

God has created us for love, and for the joy which comes from love. After the creation of man God said, “it is not good for the man to be alone,” and so He created a woman, and the first family was founded. The family was created to be a school of love; a union of love in which new life can come into the world and learn to give and receive love. The family is a school of love that ought to prepare us to be taken up into an even greater union of love: the love of God Himself. God’s own life is the unspeakable joy of the love given and received in the Blessed Trinity between Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. And He wishes to take us up into that love, to make us (as it were) part of His own family.

But from the very beginning human families are threatened by sin. In the very first family Cain kills Abel, and through all time many families are torn apart by infidelity and jealously and every kind of sin.

But our Lord in coming into the world restored the family. He Himself was born into a human family, becoming a little child in the manger. And He won the grace for our families to become schools of divine love. Today we celebrate the Feast of John, the beloved disciple, who wrote so beautifully of God’s love. St John tells us that the first of our Lord’s miracles took place at the wedding feast of Cana, at the founding of a new family, where our Lord changed water into wine. Today we will bless wine in honor of St John, as a symbol of the joy that flows from God’s love. But St John, who spoke so eloquently of love, was not himself married. Many of the other apostles were married, but St John was not. In this he was like our Lord Himself, who was born into a human family, but did not found an earthly family; He founded only the supernatural family of the Church. And many monks and nuns throughout the ages have followed the example of our Lord (and of St John), and have resolved to remain unmarried. They do this as a sign that the true fulfillment of our hearts, the final healing of our loneliness and fear, does not come in this mortal life, but in the wedding feast of eternity.

The Church needs both forms of life. She needs good Christian families, who can be schools of love, preparations for and signs of the coming union with God in Heaven. And she needs good monks and nuns, who by giving up the “happy ending” of spousal love in this life, show our hope for something yet greater.


06:37

'62ville: Losing the Apostles [The Rad Trad]


One of the few things this blog unambiguously advocates is a widespread reform of the Roman liturgy that involves recovering essential elements of the Latin tradition conspicuously absent in the "extraordinary form" Office and Mass of 1962. These elements include the psalter (lost to Pius X), Holy Week (lost to Pius XII), decent vestments (lost to the Italians), and decent taste (lost to kitsch).

Serious discussion of the Roman liturgical reforms in traditionalist circles, at least until respectable scholars like Laurence Hemming questioned the 1911 breviary reforms, usually contrasted "pre-1955" with 1962 and highlighted glaring differences such as what Pius XII did to Holy Week as a test run for the reformed liturgy. Something less noticeable is what differs on a more regular basis.

Today, until 1955, would have been the feast of St. John the Evangelist, Our Lord's favorite Apostle. One correspondent, who has successfully implemented proper Last Gospels, public horae minores, and some pre-reform Holy Week days at his parish, lamented that his pastor would be observing Sunday within the octave of the Nativity rather than St. John. Offhandedly, I asked how many Apostles had the 1962 liturgy entirely disregarded in the last year; unexpectedly, he told me five. In another conversation a while back I was speaking with an ordo compiler who offhandedly remarked "Nothing for St Andrew this year. He was only the first Apostle."

I am unsure how strictly the Roman liturgy ranked the Apostles before St Pius V's revisions in 1568-1570. Most local European rites give the Apostles, even Peter & Paul, a semi-double rank. Pius V upgraded many feasts to double rank, which allowed them to outrank Sunday. This does not, however, put the pre-Pius V system on par with 1962. Although a semi-double did not outrank Sunday, it was not discarded. Semi-double feasts impeded by Sunday were transferred to the next ferial day. Under St Pius X's system Apostles' Double of the Second Class feasts continued to outrank Sundays, even though lesser feasts could not (they did, however, warrant commemorations at Mass and in the Office). Even under Pius XII's 1955 revisions there were provisions for commemorating the now lessened feasts of the Apostles. The simplification of commemorations in 1962 breaks with all tradition in completely and utterly doing nothing for Apostles not named Peter & Paul when their feasts fall on Sunday. 

Wholesale liturgical restoration is not feasible at this point, even within traditionalist communities, which are quite happy just to get their Mass once a week and have a place at the local parish. We cannot begrudge Catholics gratitude for this. We can, however, push for some provision to be made for such boisterous flaws in a liturgy that purports to be the "Mass of all times." Would it be too much for Fr. Tradman to do a commemoration and proper ultimum evangelium for St. John tomorrow? He only wrote a Gospel.

05:52

Funny Things [The Paraphasic]

Well, one funny thing, at least.  I'm watching the fifth season of TNT's Falling Skies (a post-apocalyptic alien invasion family drama with an American Revolution theme), and someone gives one of the main characters (a former American History prof) a copy of Toqueville's Democracy in America.


I love that the props team at Falling Skies chose to mimic the Library of America edition of Toqueville, but they seem to have forgotten to check the man's name (Alexis, not Alexander).  Here's the cover they're mimicking.


05:51

Matins readings for Nativity to the Commemoration of the Baptism of Our Lord: Masterlist [Lectio Divina Notes]

As regular readers will have noticed, I've started putting together a complete list of Matins readings for the Benedictine Office (which include the Sunday Gospels for the Mass) each week.  I'll continue to do that until the list is complete, but I thought it might be helpful to try and consolidate the listings by season for future reference.  This post will accordingly be something of a work in progress.

Sources

Where they are available online, I'm providing the texts specified or a link thereto, based on the Monastic Breviary of 1962-63.  The English for most feasts is available in hardcopy in Liturgical Readings.  The Lessons of the Temporale Cycle and Principal Feasts of the Sanctoral  Cycle according to the Monastic Breviary, Grail Publicatins, 1941 (Reprint available).

Useful online sources for the English (and sometimes Latin) sources of the readings are:
New Advent (Bible and Fathers)
Divinum Officium (you may have to check the different version of Matins on offer there; in addition the readings are divided in accordance with the Roman Office, not the Benedictine)
Divine Light Blog

Readings for the traditional Benedictine Office, for the season are set out below.  Note that Sundays and other feasts will displace the readings set for the days some cases, so you will need to check against an Ordo).

Vigil of the Nativity

Nocturn I: Homily of St Jerome
Nocturn II: Chapter, Rom 1:4

Christmas Octave

Matins readings for the feast of the Nativity

Matins readings for Sunday within the Octave of Christmas

St Stephen (December 26)

Nocturn I: Acts 6:1-4, 5-6, 7-10 &7:54; 7: 55-60a
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Fulgentius on St Stephen
Nocturn III: Homily of St Jerome on Matthew 4: 23, 34-36
Gospel: St Matthew 23: 34-39

Holy Innocents (December 28)

Nocturn I: Jeremiah 31:15-17; 18-19;20-21; 22-23
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Augustine (nb attributed to St Caesarius in breviary)
Nocturn III: Sermon of St Jerome
Gospel: St Matthew 2: 13-18

29 December (5th day in the Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Bede (I, 7 on the Nativity of Our Lord)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

(or Common of a Martyr for St Thomas Beckett)

30 December (6th day in Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Ambrose (on St Luke 2:53-54)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

31 December (7th day in the Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Leo (Sermon 26 on the Nativity of Our Lord, 6)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

1 January (Octave of the Nativity)

Nocturn I: Romans 4 1-5, 6-8, 9-12, 13-17
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Leo (27 on the Nativity of Our Lord 7)
Nocturn III: Homily of Ambrose (On Luke 2:55-57)
Gospel: St Luke 2:21

Gospel for Most Holy Name of Jesus (formerly Jan 2) (St Luke 2:21)

2 January 

Romans 5: 1-5; 6-9; 10-12

3 January

Romans 6:1-5; 6-11; 12-18

4 January

Romans 7:1-3; 4-6; 7-9

5 January

Romans 8:1-4; 5-9; 9-11

Epiphanytide

Feast of the Epiphany

Gospel for the feast of the Epiphany (Jan 6)

January 7

Romans 9:1-5; 6-10; 11-16

January 8

Romans 12:1-3;4-8;9-16

January 9

Romans 13:1-4; 4-7; 8-10

January 10

Romans 14:1-4; 5-8; 9-13

January 11

Romans 15:1-4; 5-11; 12-16

January 12

Romans 15:17-21; 30-33; 16: 17-19; 25-27

January 13

Gospel for the Commemoration of the Baptism of Our Lord (Jan 13)


05:46

Advent: Sunday Gospels and Matins Readings: Masterpost [Lectio Divina Notes]

As regular readers will have noticed, I've started putting together a complete list of Matins readings for the Benedictine Office (which include the Sunday Gospels for the Mass) each week.  I'll continue to do that until the list is complete, but I thought it might be helpful to try and consolidate the listings by season for future reference.

Sources

Where they are available online, I'm providing the texts specified or a link thereto, based on the Monastic Breviary of 1962-63.  The English for most feasts is available in hardcopy in Liturgical Readings.  The Lessons of the Temporale Cycle and Principal Feasts of the Sanctoral  Cycle according to the Monastic Breviary, Grail Publicatins, 1941 (Reprint available).

Useful online sources for the English (and sometimes Latin) sources of the readings are:
New Advent (Bible and Fathers)
Divinum Officium (you may have to check the different version of Matins on offer there; in addition the readings are divided in accordance with the Roman Office, not the Benedictine)
Divine Light Blog

Readings for the traditional Benedictine Office, for the season are set out below.  Note that Sundays and other feasts will displace the readings set for the days some cases, so you will need to check against an Ordo).

Advent 1

First Sunday of Advent (Gospel and Nocturn III readings)
Week 1 Matins readings list (Isaiah 1-7)

Advent 2

Second Sunday of Advent (Matins Readings+ Gospel)
Week 2 Matins readings list (Isaiah 11-25)

Advent 3

Third Sunday of Advent (Matins readings+Gospel)
Week 3 Matins readings list (Isaiah 28-33; St Luke)

Advent 4

Fourth Sunday of Advent (Matins readings and Gospel)
Readings for fourth week of Advent &Christmas

02:21

The Terror of Christmas [The TOF Spot]

from Eifelheim:

The monks at St. Martin’s Church were assembling a large crèche in the sanctuary.  Francis of Assisi had begun the custom of building a Christmas crèche, and its popularity had lately been growing in the Germanies. 
     “We start placing figures after Martinmas,” the prior explained.  The Feast of St. Martin would mark the popular beginning of the Christmas season, though not the liturgical one.  “First, the animals.  Then, on Christmas Vigil-night, the Holy Family; on Christmas day, the Shepherds; and finally on Epiphany, the Wise Men.” 
     “Certain church fathers,” Dietrich said, “ascribed the Nativity to March, which would be more reasonable than December if shepherds were watching their flocks by night.” 
     The monks paused in their labors and looked at each other.  They laughed.  “It’s what happened that matters, not when it happened,” the prior told him.
     Dietrich had no answer, only that it was the sort of historical irony that had appealed to students in Paris and he was no longer a student and this was not Paris.  “The calendar is wrong in any case,” he said. 
     “As Bacon and Grosseteste showed,” the prior agreed.  “Franciscans are not backward in natural philosophy.  ‘Only the man learned in nature truly understands the Spirit, since he uncovers the Spirit where it lies – in the heart of nature.’” 
     Dietrich shrugged.  “I intended a jest, not a criticism.  Everyone talks about the calendar, but no one does anything to fix it.”  In fact, since the Incarnation signified the beginning of a new era, it had been symbolically assigned to New Year’s Day in March, and December 25th necessarily fell nine months after.  Dietrich nodded at the crèche.  “In any case, a pretty display.”
     “It is not ‘a pretty display,’” the prior admonished him, “but a dread and solemn warning to the mighty: ‘Behold your God: a poor and helpless child!’” 
 

01:00

Matins readings for the first week of Christmas [Lectio Divina Notes]

Matins in the Benedictine Office this week are as follows:

Sunday 27 December (Sunday within the Octave) - see separate post 

Nocturn I: Acts 1:1-7, 8-10, 11-13, 14-19
Nocturn II: St Leon, Sermon 29 (on the Nativity 9, 1)
Nocturn III: Homily of St Ambrose on St Luke 2: 60-62
Gospel: St Luke 2:33-40

Monday 28 December (Holy Innocents)

Nocturn I: Jeremiah 31:15-17; 18-19;20-21; 22-23
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Augustine (nb attributed to St Caesarius in breviary)
Nocturn III: Sermon of St Jerome
Gospel: St Matthew 2: 13-18

Tuesday 29 December (5th day in the Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Bede (I, 7 on the Nativity of Our Lord)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

(or Common of a Martyr for St Thomas Beckett)

Wednesday 30 December (6th day in Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Ambrose (on St Luke 2:53-54)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

Thursday 31 December (7th day in the Octave)

Nocturn I: Homily of St Leo (Sermon 26 on the Nativity of Our Lord, 6)
Nocturn II (chapter): Isaiah 9:6

Friday 1 January (Octave of the Nativity)

Nocturn I: Romans 4 1-5, 6-8, 9-12, 13-17
Nocturn II: Sermon of St Leo (27 on the Nativity of Our Lord 7)
Nocturn III: Homily of Ambrose (On Luke 2:55-57)
Gospel: St Luke 2:21

Saturday 2 January (Our Lady on Saturday)

Reading 1: Romans 5 1-5
Reading 2: Romans 5: 6-12
Reading 3: From the letter of St Ambrose to Pope Siricius (Letter 42, n4-5)

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Lex Christianorum XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Ley Natural XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Little Flower Farm XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
LMS Chairman XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Loved As If XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
marcpuck XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Mary Victrix XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Mathias von Gersdorff XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Musings of a Pertinacious Papist XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Liturgical Movement XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Sherwood XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
New Song XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
News - thomistica XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
NICK'S CATHOLIC BLOG XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
One Mad Mom XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
OnePeterFive XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Opus Publicum XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Over the Rhine and Into the Tiber XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Oz Conservative XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Paths of Love XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Psallam Domino XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RORATE CÆLI XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
RSS XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Sancrucensis XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Scholastiker XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Semiduplex XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Siris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Spirit of Teuchtar II XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Conleth's Catholic Heritage Association XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
St. Peter's List XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Steeple and State XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Symposium XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tęsknota XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Taylor Marshall XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Tea at Trianon XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
That The Bones You Have Crushed May Thrill XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The American Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Badger Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Dormitory XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Catholic Thing XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The City and the World XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Daily Register XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Deacon's Bench XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Divine Lamp XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Eponymous Flower XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The hermeneutic of continuity XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Jesuit Post XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Josias XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Lepanto Institute XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Low Churchman's Guide to the Solemn High Mass XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Paraphasic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Prosblogion XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Rad Trad XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Remnant Newspaper - The Remnant Newspaper - Remnant Articles XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sacred Page XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The Sensible Bond XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
The TOF Spot XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Theological Flint XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
totaliter aliter XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Traditional Catholic Priest XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Transalpine Redemptorists at home XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unam Sanctam Catholicam XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Unequally Yoked XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Voice of the Family XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vox Cantoris XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Vultus Christi XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Whispers in the Loggia XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
Zippy Catholic XML 22:00, Thursday, 21 January 23:00, Thursday, 21 January
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