Wednesday, 13 January

23:24

Waiting for Hope: Obama’s Last State of the Union [The Jesuit Post]

State of the Union 2016

Watching President Obama’s State of the Union took me back to 2008.

This final State of the Union address was vintage Obama. He envisioned a hopeful politics directed toward the future, a future that is less partisan and more democratic than today. Obama wants that future to be guided by four questions:

  • First, how do we give everyone a fair shot at opportunity and security in this new economy?
  • Second, how do we make technology work for us, especially when it comes to solving urgent challenges like climate change?
  • Third, how do we keep America safe and lead the world without becoming its policeman?
  • And finally, how can we make our politics draw out the best in us, and not the worst?

This fourth question is not just about specific policies advanced by our government, but how we govern in the first place. Obama was elected with great hopes for a “post-partisan” politics: a hope-filled desire to govern with reason and goodwill rather than from a posture of fear and division. Inspired by this hope, Obama is at his best when he seeks to build consensus, because it allows him to draw all Americans into the project of governing.

When he says “we,” he is talking about each of us.

All this sounds very much like the Obama we got to know in 2008, whose promise of hope and change inspired so many. And that’s the problem. It’s 2016. What has come of that hope and change he promised?  

The point isn’t that Obama has failed, nor that we should blame Obama for the disappointments of the past seven years. Nor should we blame the GOP for everything (nor scapegoat Donald Trump for that matter, who is surely more of a symptom than a cause of our present condition).

The fact is that while everyone in Washington has been talking about polarization for the past seven years, little has changed for the better. And when I hear Obama call for unity, without a clear course for reaching unity…no one in D.C. seems to know how to attain it.

To take the most obvious example, Obama in 2008 urged us toward common goals and consensus. He makes that same point now in 2016:

The future we want — opportunity and security for our families; a rising standard of living and a sustainable, peaceful planet for our kids — all that is within our reach. But it will only happen if we work together. It will only happen if we can have rational, constructive debates.

It is hard to disagree with these aspirations. The trouble is: how do we get there? How are we to achieve “rational, constructive debates”? Presumably partisans of all stripes can agree that Obama’s first three questions (improving the economy, harnessing technology, bolstering American safety) are important ones to ask.  The questions are not the problem, but how different political elites attempt to answer. They disagree on how we balance our values when they come into conflict: which takes primacy, liberty or security? Equality or freedom?  They disagree, in short, on how they should answer the fourth question.

And so I submit that this fourth question is really the first, and perhaps only, question that should concern us in the present moment: how can politics draw out the best in us? In the SOTU, Obama admits that he has not achieved his hopes:

It’s one of the few regrets of my presidency — that the rancor and suspicion between the parties has gotten worse instead of better. There’s no doubt a president with the gifts of Lincoln or Roosevelt might have better bridged the divide, and I guarantee I’ll keep trying to be better so long as I hold this office.

Of course, the most intractable polarization is among our political leadership. The American people are not nearly so divided. And so in one of the great rhetorical moves of the address, Obama signals that the American people themselves must lead this charge toward change:

Changes in our political process — in not just who gets elected but how they get elected — that will only happen when the American people demand it. It will depend on you. That’s what’s meant by a government of, by, and for the people.

Perhaps that really is it. Change is not going to come from D.C., but from the people. This might not be encouraging news, however, given the limited success of groups like the Tea Party or Occupy movements. We should acknowledge too that change is going to be slow, that expectations need to be moderate, and that no one person can do it all.

In all of this, however, I think there is cause for some hope. It’s not every day that a sitting president admits to a regret of his administration. It’s not every day, either, that the response of the opposition party to the State of the Union (by Gov. Nikki Haley of South Carolina) includes a similar admission:

We as Republicans need to own that truth. We need to recognize our contributions to the erosion of the public trust in America’s leadership. We need to accept that we’ve played a role in how and why our government is broken.

And then we need to fix it.

The foundation that has made America that last, best hope on earth hasn’t gone anywhere. It still exists. It is up to us to return to it.

Nikki Haley and Obama probably don’t agree on much…but they do meet on the road of contrition. Polarization and rancor in our politics will not soon be solved by offering oneself as the perfect solution to the country’s problems, but by humbly admitting the ways that political elites have caused those problems.  And a newly empowered American people should be ready to accept these apologies — and to pay careful attention as we draw closer to November.

–//–

Title Image coutesy of author.

23:13

A 'gay lobby' at the Vatican? One cardinal says it's real, and Pope Francis is responding [CNA Daily News - Vatican]

Vatican City, Jan 13, 2016 / 04:13 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The influential Cardinal Oscar Maradiaga has acknowledged the presence of a “gay lobby” in the Vatican. In a new interview, he says that Pope Francis has adopted a gradual approach to address it – and that Catholic teaching won’t change.

The Honduran newspaper El Heraldo asked the cardinal whether there actually was an attempted or successful “infiltration of the gay community in the Vatican.”

Cardinal Maradiaga responded: “Not only that, also the Pope said: there was even a ‘lobby’ in this sense.”

“Little by little the Pope is trying to purify it,” he continued. “One can understand them, and there is pastoral legislation to attend to them, but what is wrong cannot be truth.”

Cardinal Maradiaga is the Archbishop of Tegucigalpa, Honduras and the coordinator of the Council of Cardinals who advise Pope Francis on the reform of the Curia.

HIs interview, published Jan. 12, also touched on some perceptions about Pope Francis.

The newspaper said some people have interpreted Pope Francis’ other remarks to think there was a possibility the Church would support same-sex marriage.

The cardinal rejected this possibility.

“No, we must understand that there are things that can be reformed and others cannot,” he said. “The natural law cannot be reformed. We can see how God has designed the human body, the body of the man and the body of a woman to complement each other and transmit life. The contrary is not the plan of creation. There are things that cannot be changed.”

A previous report about the Pope working to counter the “gay lobby” was widely read, but its accuracy was uncertain.

In June 2013 the left-leaning Chilean Catholic website “Reflexión y liberación” claimed that Pope Francis had told a meeting of the Latin American Confederation of Men and Women Religious that there is a “gay lobby” in the Church and “we have to see what we can do (about it).”

However, the Latin American Confederation of Men and Women said that this report rested on a summary account that relied on the memory of participants, not a recording. This summary was intended for meeting participants and was not intended for publication. The confederation said the reported assertion “cannot be attributed with certainty to the Holy Father.”

Pope Francis in a July 28, 2013 in-flight interview returning to Italy from Brazil briefly discussed this alleged lobby in the context of penitence, confession and God’s forgiveness.

“So much is written about the gay lobby. I have yet to find anyone who can give me a Vatican identity card with 'gay' [written on it]. They say they are there,” the Pope said.

He said that all lobbies are bad and “the gravest problem for me.” Citing the Catechism’s teaching against marginalizing homosexual persons, he said, “If a person is gay and seeks the Lord and has good will, well who am I to judge them?”

Cardinal Maradiaga also spoke to El Heraldo about reform and changes to the Church.

“We should not expect there will be major reforms in the doctrine of the Church,” he said. “The reform is the organization of the Curia.”

He acknowledged resistance to Curia reform, saying there are people who “resist any changes” precisely because “they do not know the life of the Church.”

The Church is “not merely a human institution,” he explained. Rather, it is “humane-divine” and “natural and supernatural.” This means “there are things that do not really depend on what is human.”

The cardinal’s remarks on a “gay lobby” follow years of increasingly prominent agitation for doctrinal change from non-Catholics and some Catholics.

As CNA has reported previously, LGBT activists have backed conferences and advocacy events to counter the narrative of the Catholic Church, especially during its synods on the family. These actions include the formation of a coalition called the Global Network of Rainbow Catholics and an advocacy campaign that targeted synod attendees in hopes of countering the influence of bishops from West Africa.

 

23:12

MPR Reporting Ex-Twin Cities archbishop Nienstedt takes post at Michigan parish [The Badger Catholic]

Archbishop John Nienstedt, who stepped down in June as head of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, has taken on a temporary pastoral role at a church in Battle Creek, Mich.

Nienstedt resigned the Twin Cities post after Ramsey County prosecutors charged the archdiocese with failing to protect children from a predatory priest.

The charge followed two years of revelations about the failure of the archdiocese to protect children from sexual abuse at the hands of clergy. Nienstedt, who served eight years as Twin Cities archbishop, admitted no mistakes in his resignation letter.

According to the bulletin at the St. Philip Catholic Church (.pdf), Nienstedt will fill in for the head priest, who is undergoing medical treatment, over the next six months.

Nienstedt will perform some weekend and weekday masses, visit the sick and celebrate mass for nursing home and assisted living facilities. He'll also fill in for other priests in the diocese when needed.

Nienstedt could not immediately be reached for comment. The Diocese of Kalamazoo said in a statement that Neinstedt was a priest in good standing and was welcome at the St. Philip Parish.
MPR

HT Ray

Image

23:04

What Pope Francis' book could tell us about the upcoming synod doc [CNA Daily News - Vatican]

Vatican City, Jan 13, 2016 / 04:04 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- As things are picking up around the Vatican in the new year, anticipation is buzzing over the release of Pope Francis’ document on the conclusions of the 2014 and 2015 synod of bishops on the family.

Expectations are soaring as to how the Pope will address the major, hot-button issues brought up in the two-year discussion, the biggest of were access to communion for divorced and civilly remarried Catholics, as well as a change in the Church’s stance toward homosexuality.

The Pope is expected to release a final document on the conclusions of the synods sometime this spring.

In a Dec. 29 interview with L’Osservatore Romano’s Italian edition, the Secretary General of the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Lorenzo Baldisseri, confirmed that the document will take the traditional form of an apostolic exhortation.

Though the exact date has not been announced, sources close to CNA say the document will be published in March, which falls just before first meeting of the new synod council in April.

However, while questions continue to loom on what Francis will say regarding the issues of communion and homosexuality, the Pope himself has recently dropped a few hints as to where he stands in his new book-length interview with Italian journalist Andrea Tornielli.

Released Jan. 12, the book, titled “The Name of God is Mercy,” includes nine chapters following the foreword by Tornielli, and consists of questions-and-answers between him and Pope Francis.

In the Q&A, Francis hits on several big themes in his pontificate, including mercy, his distaste for the rigidity of what he calls “the Scholars of the Law” who are obsessed with rules, and confession.

While there is not much in terms of novelty in the text, two parts stand out as significant. The first is an episode the Pope recounts of one of his nieces, who civilly married a divorced man that had not yet obtained an annulment from his first marriage.

Although the man was required to abstain from communion, which is Church practice for persons in his situation, the Pope said that the man was so religious that every Sunday before Mass he went to confession and told the priest, “I know you can’t absolve me but I have sinned, please give me a blessing.”

This, the Pope said, “is a religiously mature man.” While Francis doesn’t say anything explicit on the matter doctrine, his description of the man could be read as an indication that he is likely to emphasize an attitude of welcoming and acceptance, but not necessarily a change in current practice.

This idea is backed up by what Pope Francis says later in his response to a question Tornielli poses on whether there can ever be opposition between doctrine and mercy.

“I will say this: mercy is real; it is the first attribute of God. Theological reflections on doctrine or mercy may then follow, but let us not forget that mercy is doctrine,” the Pope said, signaling that he sees no opposition between the two, but that they are, in fact, entirely compatible.

After making this point, Francis immediately turns to the Gospel story of the adulteress who stands before Jesus while the people around her, faithful followers of the Law of Moses, are prepared to stone her.

He noted that once those ready to cast their stones have dropped them and left, Jesus turns to the woman, who “was probably still frightened,” and tells her “neither do I condemn you. Go, (and) from now on do not sin anymore.”

When it comes to this scene, there are those who make a common mistake with Francis.

Many who bask in the Pope’s message of mercy are often tempted to read only as far as the withholding of condemnation, yet at the same time are frequently just as eager to leave out the second part – that of his emphasis on recognizing one’s sin and committing not do it again.

The link between mercy and doctrine is alluded to yet again in the Pope’s advice to priests, when he tells them that while in the confessional, they must “talk, listen with patience, and above all tell people that God loves them.”

If a confessor can’t absolve someone, “he needs to explain why, he needs to give them a blessing, even without the holy sacrament.”

“Be tender with these people. Do not push them away…if we don’t show them the love and mercy of God, we push them away and perhaps they will never come back. So embrace them and be compassionate, even if you can’t absolve them. Give them a blessing anyway.”

Although there are certain situations in which a person cannot be absolved – such as in the case of someone who has been divorced and civilly remarried without an annulment – the Pope’s answer in these cases is to have compassion, but that this compassion doesn’t necessarily mean change.

Pope Francis said that the Church needs “to enter the darkness, the night in which so many of our brothers live…and let them feel our closeness,” but clarified that she must do it “without letting ourselves be wrapped up in that darkness and influenced by it.”

“Caring for outcasts and sinners does not mean letting the wolves attack the flock,” he said. “It means trying to reach everyone by sharing the experience of mercy.”

Another important point is when the Pope comments on his infamous “Who Am I to Judge?” remark, which instantly gained him the world’s attention and seemingly overnight became one of his most misunderstood and misinterpreted phrases.

When asked about the expression, Francis explained that he was “paraphrasing by heart the Catechism of the Catholic Church,” which is the official compendium of the Church’s teaching.

He also said he was glad they were talking about “homosexual people,” and cautioned that “people should not be defined only by their sexual tendencies.”

“I prefer that homosexuals come to confession, that they stay close to the Lord, and that we pray all together. You can advise them to pray, show goodwill, show them the way, and accompany them along it.”

Given these remarks, it again suggests that the Pope is supportive of a compassionate, inclusive attitude toward those with homosexual tendencies, but that a change in the Church’s long-standing teaching on the topic of homosexuality isn’t up for debate.

So all in all, while the document has yet to be released, if the Pope’s new book is any indication of what’s coming, we can expect no big changes.

21:56

Ladies of Divine Mercy host "Discernment of Spirits" event with Msgr. Bartylla at Pine Bluff Jan 15 [The Badger Catholic]

&
Please join us for a beautiful, reflective evening adoring Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament as Ladies of Divine Mercy...
Posted by Knights of Divine Mercy on Thursday, January 7, 2016

21:50

Mrs. Walter Matt Desperately Needs Prayers [The Remnant Newspaper - The Remnant Newspaper - Remnant Articles]

Dear Remnant Family:In your charity, please remember in your prayers my mother, Marilyn Matt, who was afflicted with a stroke during an operation on her heart valve last night. The early prognosis is...

See more at http://remnantnewspaper.com

21:33

Cogito spirituality [Just Thomism]

Descartes first development of his cogito is this:

If my existence could be given to sensation, it could be doubted.

It is impossible to doubt I exist.

If my existence could not be given to sensation, it cannot be physical.

A more elegant argument for the spirituality of the self is hard to imagine.


21:31

Fundamentalism of the Sources: Problems with Some Practices of Source Criticism – Part 8 [Theological Flint]

This is from Theological Flint

At long last, I must justify the title: Fundamentalism of the Sources. Why this title? In short, because the critic practicing in the manner stated previously reads each source as a fundamentalist would read the bible as a whole. How does a fundamentalist read the bible as a whole. Well, there are many facets to […]

The post Fundamentalism of the Sources: Problems with Some Practices of Source Criticism – Part 8 appeared first on Theological Flint.

21:06

"Pope Video" Removed: Vatican or Jesuit Whiners? [The Eponymous Flower]

Screenshot_1[Verrecchio] Apparently, after more than 8,000 views, the masterminds of “The Pope Video” have decided that my rendition offering a more proper translation of the apostasy therein must be suppressed.

I just received the following notice from Vimeo:

“We removed your video because a third party claims that it infringes a copyright that the third party owns or has the right to enforce.”

Read further... 

https://akacatholic.com/breaking-the-pope-video-removed/



20:50

Mary's intercession credited for saving Missouri farmland from floods [CNS Top Stories]

IMAGE: CNS photo/Lisa Johnston, St. Louis Review

By Jennifer Brinker and Dave Luecking

PERRYVILLE, Mo. (CNS) -- Perhaps it was merely coincidence.

Or perhaps not.

"I'd call it Providence," said Vincentian Father Robert Brockland, who along with Amy Naeger, her brother Neal Gremaud, St. Louisan Bob Klump and Vincentian Father Walter Reisinger were at the center of this story in the last week of December and the first weekend of January.

None needs to be convinced of heavenly intervention, though the Army Corps of Engineers might need convincing after an unknown force or flawed human prediction kept the Mississippi River on its side of the levee and Bois Brule Bottom farmers dry in the flood straddling 2015 and 2016.

After heavy rains on Christmas weekend, the National Weather Service forecast the Mississippi River to crest at about 50 feet -- the height of levee on the Missouri side of the river after being fortified with two feet of rock. A breach in the levee would have spelled disaster for acres of farmland and the few remaining to live in the bottomland since the record flood of 1993, with a crest of 49.74 feet.

The actual crest Jan. 2, was 4 feet lower than predicted. An engineer told Gremaud that the Corps "didn't understand it; the Mississippi did not act like it should have" with a crest of "only" 45.99 feet.

For the Vincentian priests, the siblings Gremaud and Klump, the reason was simple: the intercession of Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

"I don't think it's any coincidence," Naeger said Jan. 1 while sitting in her mother-in-law's restaurant -- Al's Place in McBride.

Neal Gremaud got the prayer ball rolling Dec. 27, driving the northern portion of the 26-mile levee with Father Reisinger from nearby Perryville. They prayed and invoked the intercession of Mary, who was represented by a smartphone picture of a plaque that had been in Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary Church in Belgique and now resides in a shrine at the old church's cemetery a third of mile away on a Missouri highway. They had wanted to bring the actual plaque, but to their dismay, it had been removed for safekeeping.

Independently, Naeger decided the levee needed to be blessed as well but that a statue of Our Lady of Perpetual Help needed to come along. Why a statue?

"It just came to me," she told the St. Louis Review, newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

She enlisted the help of Father Brockland, who served as administrator of St. Joseph Mission in Highland for 16 years and now lives in St. Louis. The priest stopped at Catholic Gifts and Books in Chesterfield Dec. 29 to purchase the statue, which owner Mary Bachinski had ordered a few year ago merely because an Our Lady of Perpetual Help statue is rare.

"It's always a plaque or a picture," she said. "I put it in a corner and forgot about it."

Until Father Brockland called. With statue in hand, he and Klump drove to Perry County, and Naeger met them at the Shrine of the Miraculous Medal, where the statue was blessed.

Then, with Naeger driving, Father Brockland riding shotgun and Klump in the backseat, they spent the next two-and-a-half hours driving along the southern portion of the levee, praying the Divine Mercy Chaplet and the "Memorare." They stopped every 10th of a mile for Father Brockland to bless the levee with holy water.

"We didn't talk very much," Father Brockland said. "We were all praying."

The drive, at just 6 or 7 mph, was harrowing. Water was lapping up on the side of the levee, where a man was swept away in his truck when the levee broke while he patrolled in the flood of '93. He survived two hours in flood water, but now Naeger, Father Brockland and Klump drove over the same spot.

"Around the bends, the water was really deep," said Naeger, who juggled the steering wheel, the 12-inch statue and a rosary -- three items in two hands. "I was worried."

And overcome with emotion.

"When we started processing, it was ... really overwhelming, " she said, choking up three days after the drive.

She chuckled about her next thought.

"This is the Blessed Mother of our Lord in a (Chevrolet) Tahoe," she said, with a laugh. "She should be traveling in something more elaborate."

But Naeger then felt a sense of calm.

"After that, I wasn't afraid anymore, because I knew she had taken care of everything," she said.

Afterward, they stopped at Al's Place, where Father Brockland enthroned the statue of Our Lady and recited the "Blessing of a Community Against Floods," from the Roman Ritual, an official book of prayers and ceremonies used in administering the sacraments. His favorite part of the blessing is the final line: "And may the blessing of Almighty God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, come upon these waters and keep them always under control."

"The Blessed Mother is the intercessor for her Incarnate Son, Jesus," Father Brockland said. "She is mother most powerful, and she comes to intercede for us. Jesus cannot refuse His mother."

The devotion to Our Lady of Perpetual Help dates back at least a century among the Catholic farming community in the Perryville area. After a flood in 1943, the Belgique church got the plaque and processed with it along the levee, praying for the Blessed Mother's intercession.

With the one notable exception, the bottomland has remained dry since. The plaque was absent when the Flood of '93 covered farmland and destroyed homes and the old Blessed Nativity Church, which had been closed just the year prior. Gremaud now owns the parish property; he parks farm equipment in a shed where a rectory, a convent and a school stood beside and behind the church.

After closing, the church and its contents were auctioned, but in advance of the '93 flood, Gremaud learned the history of plaque, and he and others sought its return. They barely had repurchased the plaque -- the auctioneer found it for them -- before the levee broke. After the flood, the shrine was built, and though the plaque was high and dry this time around, the Gremaud siblings and Vincentian priests were proactive in making sure Our Lady of Perpetual Help was on board to help them.

"The farmers look to Our Lady of Perpetual Help for safety from accidents, for their farm equipment and financial interests," Father Brockland said. "They are dedicated to Mary."

For good reason.

"We drove the levee all the way north and all the way south, and no one lost anything," he said.

- - -

Brinker and Luecking are staff reporters at the St. Louis Review, newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Louis.

- - -

Copyright © 2016 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

19:38

Scriptural case against reprobation [Just Thomism]

For Augustine, only saints were predestined, but the word often means God’s supposed pre-determination of both the blessed and the damned. Anyone denying the Scriptural basis of the pre-determination of the damned will be scandalized in a few places: 1.) Paul’s “vessels of wrath” and “vessels of mercy” (Romans 9:23) (2.) The claim in 1 Peter 2:8 that both the saints and the disobedient are stones that have been prepared by God, and (3.) Proverbs 16:4 “The LORD works out everything to its proper end– even the wicked for a day of disaster.”

But none of these argue for reprobation, in fact each objection falls apart as soon as one tries to formulate them. Paul’s “vessels of wrath” statement is a counterfactual; and I Peter and Proverbs make no reference to the predestination. Done.

The Scriptural case against reprobation is not best made by trading gotcha-quotes but by seeing it as contrary to the whole narrative of the text. One would predict an entirely different Scriptural narrative if both the saints and the damned arose from God foresight and planning. God divides the light from the darkness, but he never makes the darkness nor says anything about it (it is the only feature of creation that God does not call good). God makes one first couple in blessedness, not a blessed and a cursed couple. God makes covenants with Abraham, but he does nothing to build or cause the construction of the city of Cain, Sodom, the Moabites, etc. In all of Christ’s parables of the kingdom, sin arises either by an accident outside the intention of God himself (the sower) or from the free action of creatures (the wheat and the tares, the wedding feast, the foolish virgins, the talents etc.) Christ speaks all the time of those who don’t make it into the kingdom, but he never describes them with metaphors that suggest a divine foresight that withholds things from certain persons.

Scripture paints a clear picture of a God that always frustrates evil by ordering it to a good, given it exists, but it never paints the picture of evil arising out of a previously established plan. We get a vision of God who always deals with evils post factum, not a God who cleverly green-lights evils whose execution he outsources to the reprobate. To say the least, the narrative arc of Scripture does not suggest a God who has planned to hold things back from creatures.

Just what sort of metaphysics we would have to develop in order to explain this is not clear. My suspicion is that we have missed important asymmetries between good and evil. Created goods require foresight and planning and have a real genesis that involves the transfer of actuality from agent to patient that ultimately traces back to the divine action; but evil has no such logos. We can give a narrative of it and find someone responsible for it, but, compared to good things, evil simply happens. We don’t need a divine permissive will to green-light the process or to cause it per accidens by the withholding of grace. All these assume that evil must have the same ontologically-satisfying reduction that goods have. But they don’t. Modern thought is certainly right that, without God, all things trace back to brute facts about which we can say no more than that they happen. And that’s what evil is.

 

 


19:38

Here’s the Story of Four-Year-Old Wisconsin boy at SOTU [The Badger Catholic]

Source
When Speaker Ryan was deciding who he should invite as his State of the Union guests, a certain four-year-old boy from Milton, WI, came to mind. The boy’s name is Logan Barritt, and he certainly has a story to tell.

It all began when Logan’s grandfather gave him a handful of pocket change, which he was going to add to his piggy bank. If you or I were given a lump of change, we probably wouldn’t think twice of what we could do with it—if anything, maybe gripe about having to carry it around. Yet when Logan’s mother asked him this very question, Logan had much bigger plans.

“I want to give it to the soldiers,” said Logan, who was raised on the stories of his Uncle Craig, a veteran Marine. Their jobs didn’t seem very “fun,” Logan explained, and he wanted to change that.

Logan’s parents posted a call for donations on their Facebook pages. The result? Enough money to send 17 care packages to Americans serving overseas for Christmas, complete with Pez dispensers. -
 See more at: http://www.speaker.gov/video/here-s-story-four-year-old-logan-barritt#sthash.SwbqFbP8.dpuf

Logan Barritt

19:36

Pope Takes Up Theme of Mercy at General Audiences [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Pope Francis during the General audience of Wednesday 19th of August 2015

Says God Is Ready to Welcome Us Back Into Right Relationship

Read more

19:34

19:19

On the way to Hell [AKA Catholic]

The National Catholic Register and the USCCB are on the way. The former, “a service of EWTN,” apart from the excellent reporting of Edward Pentin, is well on its way to becoming the Pravda of the post-conciliar church-of-man; offering precious little more than propagandized puff pieces in service to the aims of the Apostasy Party, headquarters, Rome. On January 12, for example, the Register published an article fawning over “a new milestone in Catholic-Lutheran dialogue;” the document, Declaration on the Way, published by the USCCB in October 2015. According to the article, Declaration on the Way provides evidence of just more »

19:12

Bishops Decry Deportation of Mothers and Children [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Persecuted Christians - "Aid to the Church in Need" campaign

Didn't Obama say his administration would pursue the deportation of 'felons, not families; criminals, not children; gang members, not a Mom who's working hard to provide for her kids'?

Read more

19:02

The Other Empty Seat at Obama's State of the Union Address [LES FEMMES - THE TRUTH]

A big thank you to Congressman Steve King!

Congressman Will Leave His State of the Union Seat Open for the 57 Million Aborted Babies

"My seat on the floor of Congress will also be empty. I will be in the Member’s chapel praying for God to raise up a leader whom he will use to restore the Soul of America.”

18:55

Why are Catholics being so critical of David Bowie and those who mourn him? [Abbey Roads]





Just trying to make sure he's condemned enough, or what?

Pointing out the right way and the wrong way to mourn is so important for who?

I never cared for his 'act' but I also never made any attempt to judge his soul or moral choices ...

I think it is important to be kind to those who express sympathy, and to be compassionate - even if just for the sake of his widow.

Paul speaks about being kind and compassionate in Ephesians 4:32.

Maybe try it sometime.



18:48

Tips for the Day: Eliminating Laundry Frustration [LES FEMMES - THE TRUTH]

Now that we're back in ordinary time, I thought something ordinary would be in order. So here are a few questions:
  • Do your washer and dryer eat socks? 
  • Have you ever totted up the time spent on searching for sock mates in the laundry of all your family members? 
  • Do these questions raise your blood pressure and remind you how much you dread the great sock search capers? 
I actually enjoy doing the family laundry. I like to fold wash and pray for the person who will wear what I'm folding or sleep on the sheets. But the great sock search drives me crazy! Talk about frustration! And it always seemed a stray sock remained in the bottom of the basket.


Well, I want to tell you what eliminated the sock frustration from my life: SOCK RINGS! They come in singles and doubles for thin socks and fat socks. You can buy them almost anywhere: the dollar bill store, on Amazon, etc. When I think how much time I used to spend mating socks, I start to hyperventilate. But that is one big frustration eliminated from my life by a simple solution that saves time and emotional energy.

For those with large families I suggest different colors for different family members. And if they don't use them? Well, keep a big basket in the laundry room for unmated socks and finding them is their problem not yours. No socks? Go barelegged a few times in midwinter and that might change. Mom only has to ring the socks of the littlest munchkins in the house and everybody else is responsible for ringing their own or playing the sock search game.

Some people choose the solution of letting kids do their own laundry, but I always thought that was wasteful. Water and laundry soap are more efficiently used in large loads. But it would be great training to have three baskets in the laundry room for dark, white, and light colors and have the kids sort their own laundry the night before wash day. If they want clean clothes they need to take some responsibility.

Now, for my second tip. Give family members the laundry the way they put it in. If you pull off your shirts, pants, and underwear and throw them in the laundry inside out -- that's how they come back to you. How much time does one spend turning the clothing of seven people (our family growing up) right side out when folding laundry? I only wish I had thought of it sooner. Today it takes me no time. If  my husband wants his underwear right side out, he needs to put it in the wash that way. It's particularly good training for children on two fronts: 1) being considerate to Mom and 2) taking care of your own dirty laundry.

There is no laundry fairy in the house, so do your part to make the load lighter!

"How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, and that preacheth peace: of him that sheweth forth good, that preacheth salvation, that saith to Sion: Thy God shall reign!"  Isaiah 52:7






18:41

Berlin Archbishop Visits Center for Aberrosexual Migrants [The Eponymous Flower]



Lesbian and Gay Association Berlin-Brandenburg: Archbishop wanted to check in a personal conversation about the situation of homosexual and transgender refugees - They are confronted with violence in their lodgings even in Germany.

Berlin (kath.net/KNA) The new German capital's new Catholic bishop, Heiner Koch visited a center for migrants, lesbians and gays (MILES) on Thursday in Berlin-Charlottenburg. Here, the Archbishop wanted to check in with a personal conversation on the situation of homosexual and transgender refugees, said the Lesbian and Gay Association Berlin-Brandenburg (LSVD). They are confronted by violence in their lodgings, even in Germany.

The LSVD Project MILES provides same sex oriented refugees and their families psychosocial counseling, provides first aid in crisis situations and offers others additional counseling facilities. More offerings are free legal advice, lectures and cultural evenings. Moreover, MILES helps to build self-help groups and their networking. Koch has been Archbishop since last September. Even his predecessor Rainer Woelki met four years ago with LSVD representatives, shortly after he took office.

The encounter took place in the Archbishop's Chancery, the administrative headquarters of the Archdiocese of Berlin. Subjects were then, the employment of homosexual staff in the service of the church and the demonstration critical of the Church, taking place shortly after Pope Benedict XVI's Berlin arrival on 22 September 2011. The LSVD was one of the organizers of the anti-Pope demonstration.

Link to Kath.net...

AMDG

18:35

El Paso Mass scrapped, but not papal Mass across border [CNS Top Stories]

By

EL PASO, Texas (CNS) -- The Diocese of El Paso has scrapped plans for a border Mass that would have taken place at the same time as the closing Mass of Pope Francis' visit to Mexico in February.

However, the Feb. 17 papal Mass at the fairgrounds in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, across the border from El Paso, is still going to take place as scheduled.

Elizabeth O'Hara, a spokeswoman for the El Paso Diocese, said security concerns over the size of the anticipated crowd for a U.S.-based Mass taking place at the same time as the Juarez Mass prompted the change in plans.

"The pope is still considered a head of state," O'Hara told Catholic News Service Jan. 13. The Juarez fairgrounds where the closing Mass of Pope Francis' Feb. 12-17 visit will be held is about a quarter-mile from the U.S.-Mexico border.

"It became apparent that we didn't know how many people we could potentially house on the border, which posed a safety risk to those in attendance," O'Hara added in a Jan. 13 email.

Bishop Mark J. Seitz had announced plans Dec. 12 for a concurrent Mass at the border. However, the diocese has been allotted 5,000 tickets for the Juarez Mass, O'Hara said.

Plans are underway for some kind of substitute event on the U.S. side of the border to mark the papal trip. O'Hara said Bishop Seitz had polled Catholics in the diocese, and many asked for an event at the 45,000-seat Sun Bowl football stadium.

- - -

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17:31

Church in US Supports Africa With $1M [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

World map depicting the African continent

Money distributed to 42 grants in 18 countries

Read more

17:30

Epiphany is the Eschaton [The Rad Trad]

(Marten de Vos)
Today's Lauds includes the following antiphon surrounding the Canticle of Zachary:
This day is the Church joined unto the Heavenly Bridegroom, since Christ hath washed away her sins in Jordan; the wise men hasten with gifts to the marriage supper of the King; and they that sit at meat together make merry with water turned into wine. Alleluia.
The eschatological language is clear, especially as the "marriage supper" references the book of the Apocalypse. During Advent, prophetic allusions to the Second Coming are numerous in the Breviary and in Mass readings. Now is the the climax of Christmastide, when the Second Coming mystically occurs, as symbolized in the Gifts of the Magi (the Gentiles entering into the Church; cf. Apoc. xxi.14), the Baptism in the Jordan (cf. the river of the waters of life in Apoc. xxii.1), and the Miracle at Cana (cf. the marriage supper of the Lamb in Apoc. xix.7).

St. Paul uses the Greek word epiphaneia repeatedly to refer to the future Coming of Christ. Epiphany means appearance or manifestation, and every year we celebrate anagogically the Second Coming with the Octave of Epiphany.

(Ottheinrich Bible)
All of this puts a rather terrifying spin on the three events celebrated in this octave, for they all have dark twins in the Apocalypse. For instance, the turning of water into wine at Cana has an inverse symbol with the "winepress of the fierceness of the wrath of God" in Apoc. xix. The Gentiles bringing gifts to God have an opposite when "all nations have drunk of the wine of the wrath of [the harlot's] fornication" in Apoc. xviii. The blessing of the waters at the Baptism turn to condemnation when the waters are turned to wormwood (Apoc. viii) and into blood (Apoc. xi).

As another point of minor interest, the Catholic Encyclopedia notes that, according to P. Gelasius, traditionally the dedication of virgins occurred on the feast of Epiphany. One cannot help but think of the eschatological parable of the wise and foolish virgins from Matthew's Gospel (ch. xxv).

Nevertheless, the tone of Epiphany is one of mercy and peace rather than wrath. The God-Man has been made manifest to the world in all his brightness. As another antiphon reads, "The Lord our Savior, begotten before the day-star, and before the ages, is this day made manifest in the world." Or as Leo the Great once preached,
For as justice was everywhere failing and the whole world was given over to vanity and wickedness, if the Divine Power had not deferred its judgment, the whole of mankind would have received the sentence of damnation. But wrath was changed to forgiveness, and, that the greatness of the Grace to be displayed might be the more conspicuous, it pleased God, to apply the mystery of remission to the abolishing of men's sins at a time when no one could boast of his own merits. (Sermon 33, On the Feast of the Epiphany)

17:29

The next Synod: Clergy with wives [Fr Ray Blake's Blog]


I don't think I can live through another Synod, let alone one on celibacy. Synods are such a blunt instrument and not much prone to subtlety, they scare me. Like the last two they tend to tear the Church apart.

In my diocese about 12% of our priests are former Anglican clergy and a large proportion of those are married, I suspect this is similar to most English diocese. In effect we already have a married clergy, which was introduced and accepted without a great deal of fuss or rancour. A few of us old celibates might have an occassional half hearted grumble about the fact that married clergy get, or have to have, the wealthier parishes that can support a married man and his family but we welcome their contribution and realise that without them dioceses would have to contract and parishes merge. I welcome them because they have fought the battle against liberalism in the CofE and continue that battle now. Frankly, the Church has been enriched by their presence.

Most parts of the world do not have the CofE for the local Church to gather its exiles, so appointing viri probati in these parts of the world seems entirely reasonable.
Similarly, if we are to believe Michael Vorris celibacy seems to be an important contributory factor in the mess and scandals of the American Church and the rise in power of the gay lobby.

The thing is of course celibacy is of Dominical origin
For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother's womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it. Matt 19:12
Very early on the Church demanded celibacy for Bishops and expected sexual abstinence from celebrating clergy, in conformity with OT practice. In the West in the 11th Century, as a cure for the ills, both sexual and financial, of the clergy and their families.

Fr Hunwicke, and I agree with him, believes this is move towards the ordination of women priests, and the furtherance of the liberal or relativist agenda.

17:19

US Bishops File Brief to Support Little Sisters of the Poor at Supreme Court [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Pope Francis during his surprise visit to the Little Sisters of the Poor in Washington

Argue that HHS mandate damages not only religious freedom, but society as a whole

Read more

17:00

The Resurrection Narratives and Q [Jimmy Akin]

Easter is the most important day of the Christian calendar, even more important than Christmas. Here are 9 things you need to know.

According to many scholars, Matthew and Luke based their Gospels principally on two sources: Mark and a now-lost source dubbed “Q.”

The reason for the latter is that Matthew and Luke contain about 235 verses that are not paralleled in Mark. This amounts to about a fifth of each of their Gospels, which is too much for the 235 verses to be due to random chance.

This means the material could have been picked up in one of three ways: (1) Matthew got it from Luke, (2) Luke got it from Matthew, or (3) they both got it from a lost source.

Many scholars dismiss the first two options without serious thought, but sometimes the following argument is used to support the third option: If Matthew knew Luke or vice-versa, we would expect him to include material from the other Gospel that he doesn’t contain. This argument is made particularly concerning material found in the Infancy and Resurrection Narratives.

We’ve already looked at the argument based on the Infancy Narratives (here), and now we will look at the argument based on the Resurrection Narratives.

To do this, we first need to look at the contents of the two narratives.

(NOTE: See here for other parts of my exploration of the Synoptic Problem.)

 

Matthew’s Resurrection Narrative

Beginning just after the point where Jesus is buried, the material in Matthew’s Resurrection Narrative may be divided (with an eye toward how it differs from Luke’s narrative) like this:

a)    Securing the Tomb (27:62-66)

b)   The Women Visit the Tomb (28:1-7)

c)    The Women Leave to Tell the Disciples (28:8)

d)   The Women Encounter Jesus (28:9-10)

e)    The Report of the Guards (28:11-15)

f)     The Disciples Encounter Jesus in Galilee (28:16-17)

g)    Jesus’ Final Instructions (28:18-20)

This material amounts to a total of 25 verses.

 

Luke’s Resurrection Narrative

Beginning just after the point where Jesus is buried, the material in Luke’s Resurrection Narrative may be divided (with an eye toward how it differs from Matthew’s narrative) like this:

a)    The Women Visit the Tomb (24:1-8)

b)   The Women Leave to Tell the Disciples (28:9-11)

c)    Peter Visits the Tomb (24:12)

d)   Encounter on the Road to Emmaus (24:13-35)

e)    Jesus Appears to the Eleven (24:36-49)

f)     The Ascension (24:50-53).

This material amounts to a total of 53 verses.

 

Evaluating the Alternatives

To see whether the Resurrection Narratives provide evidence that Matthew and Luke did not know each other’s Gospels, we need to look at both alternative hypotheses—that Luke knew Matthew and that Matthew knew Luke. We will cover both in the sections below.

First, though, we need to make a point that was explored at more length in the paper on the Infancy Narratives (here), which is that on either alternative, the Evangelist in question was expanding Mark with only select bits of the other Synoptic.

On the hypothesis that Mark wrote first, to put the matter concisely, Matthew used about 90% of the verses in Mark, while Luke used 55% of t. This means that Matthew had a strong preference for using material from Mark, while Luke had only a weak preference for it.

The key question, for our purposes, is what Matthew and Luke would have done with each other’s Gospels.

If Luke used Matthew then he included about 235 verses from it, which amounts to 20% of all of Matthew or 50% of Matthew if you ignore the parts of it that came from Mark.

If Matthew used Luke then, again, he included about 235 verses from it, which amounts to 20% of all of Luke or 30% of Luke if you ignore the parts of it that came from Mark.

In either case, one Evangelist was cherry-picking the other—selecting only those bits he thought would be of particular value for his audience. Neither had a default decision in favor of including a particular verse from the other. If Luke was using Matthew, it was a 50-50 tossup whether he would include a given verse unique to Matthew, and if Matthew was using Luke then the odds were 70% that he would skip a particular verse unique to Luke.

This is important because it reveals something about how we should evaluate the way one Evangelist would have used material found in the Resurrection Narrative of the other: Mathematically speaking, the burden of proof is not on a person to show why either Evangelist chose to skip material he would have seen in the other’s Gospel. (Indeed, in the case of Matthew, there would be a mathematical burden to show why he would include material found in Luke’s Resurrection Narrative.)

This does not mean there can’t be particular pieces of content that an Evangelist would have found so compelling that he should have used them if he was aware of them. But we need to argue why such content would have been so compelling to the Evangelist, not just assume that it would have been, given the numbers.

 

If Luke Used Matthew

Considering the case that Luke might have used Matthew, Robert H. Stein, who writes:

Why would he [Luke] have omitted . . . the story of the guards at the tomb (Matt. 27:62-66) and their report (Matt. 28:11-15); the unique Matthean material concerning the resurrection (Matt. 28:9-10, 16-20); and so on? (The Synoptic Problem, 102).

How much weight does Stein’s argument have?

It is worth noting that he only poses it as a series of bare questions about why Luke wouldn’t have included certain things from Matthew. He doesn’t provide any arguments why Luke should have included these things.

As a result, his argument does not have a great deal of force. It would have force if Luke had a strong default decision in favor of including material from Matthew, but we have seen that he did not. It was tossup in any particular case.

So let’s look at the seven pericopes (designated a-g) that Luke would have had before him if he was selecting material from Matthew. Given the material they contained, are there particular reasons Luke would have wanted to use them?

 

The Guards

Two of the pericopes—(a) and (e)—are a matched set. They deal with the guards that were set over the tomb and what they had to say when it was found empty. Including one without the other would have made no sense, so Luke would have been in an “in for a penny, in for a pound” situation.

He thus would have needed to include material based on Matthew 27:62-66 and 28:11-15. Luke would also have needed to include an additional verse (Matt. 28:4), which deals with the guards fainting, even though it is in the midst of pericope (b). That’s a total of 11 verses.

Would this material have been particularly interesting to Luke?

It does have some interest. For one who has confidence in the Gospel material, it closes off an alternative explanation to the resurrection (i.e., that the body was stolen). Matthew indicates that this alternative explanation had some currency in the Jewish community (Matt. 28:15).

However, Luke was not writing for a member of the Jewish community (given the strong Gentile interest of his Gospel and the Greek name or title Theophilus for the man of whom he was principally writing and who was possibly the patron funding the writing of the Gospel; cf. Luke 1:3, Acts 1:1).

Luke would have had less interest in rebutting an alternative explanation common among non-Christian Jews, particularly if Theophilus would not have come into contact with it. In that case, even raising the question of whether the body could have been stolen might have raised doubts and been seen as contrary to his purpose of showing Theophilus “the truth concerning the things of which you have been informed” (Luke 1:4).

It also would have meant lengthening his Gospel—already the longest of the four—by 11 verses or a significant fraction of that (if he abbreviated the material). That’s not a huge amount, but it is also not nothing, and, given that Luke only includes half of the uniquely Matthean verses, it would not be particularly surprising that he omitted these.

 

The Women

Another three of our Matthean pericopes—(b), (c), and (d)—concern the women who visited Jesus’ tomb. This material represents Matthew 28:1-10.

One verse of this (Matt. 28:4) is where the guards faint and can be pulled out of the total as belonging with the above topic.

The remaining 9 verses are ones where Luke simply chose to use the Markan version over the Matthean one. Of these, Matthew 28:1-8 (except 28:4) represent material that is found in the shorter ending of Mark, which means we only have two verses—Matthew 28:9-10—that Luke would have chosen to omit from what he saw in Mark.

These two verses read as follows:

And behold, Jesus met them and said, “Hail!” And they came up and took hold of his feet and worshiped him.

Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid; go and tell my brethren to go to Galilee, and there they will see me” (Matt. 29:9-10).

These verses contain two notable things:

  1. A brief resurrection encounter
  2. A directive to the disciples to go to Galilee

We would expect Luke to include the first in his Gospel only if he were determined to include even the briefest, least-described post-resurrection encounter.

However, we know that this is not the case. He has his own resurrection encounters that he wants to narrate at much longer length (Luke 24:13-53), and he omits multiple encounters in the Pauline tradition with which he would have been familiar (1 Cor. 15:5-7).

Therefore, given his tossup attitude toward Matthean material, it is not surprising that he would have omitted the extremely brief encounter that Matthew describes between Jesus and the women.

This leaves us with the directive to go to Galilee, which is dealt with below.

 

Galilee

The final two pericopes we identified—(f) and (g)—contain the final five verses of Matthew (Matt. 28:16-20).

In Matthew, all of this is indicated as taking place in Galilee (Matt. 28:16). This corresponds to Mark 16:7, where Jesus tells the women to instruct the disciples to go to Galilee, where they will see him (as he previously indicated in Mark 14:28).

In this case, Matthew seems to simply be following Mark, but is there reason to think that Luke wouldn’t?

Mark Goodacre writes:

[W]hat author, whose second volume plots events “beginning from Jerusalem” (Luke 24:47; cf. Acts 1:8) could plausibly have included an account of an announcement in Galilee? (The Case Against Q, 58).

This is an important point. Luke has already established that “repentance and forgiveness of sins should be preached in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem” (Luke 24:47) and that the disciples should “be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria and to the end of the earth” (Acts 1:8)—a structure which governs the book of Acts.

Furthermore, Luke omits the two Markan references to the disciples seeing the risen Jesus in Galilee.

In view of this, it is easy to see how Luke would have wanted to end his Gospel with material in which Jesus addressed the apostles in the area of Jerusalem in Judea—not in Galilee.

Given his tendency to only include half of the uniquely Matthean verses, it is easy to see how he could have skipped the entirety of Matthew’s last five, Galilee-centered verses.

But did he do so entirely? Goodacre writes:

It is worth asking what in Matthew’s Great Commission (Matt 28:16-20) would have been most likely to have appealed to Luke, and whether we can see any signs of it at the end of Luke’s Gospel. Perhaps the most Lukan-friendly elements here in Matthew would be Jesus’ universalistic commission . . . (“Go, therefore, making disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit,” Matt 28:19). And it is exactly this element in the commission that is echoed in Luke’s own version of it . . . (“proclaiming in his name repentance and forgiveness of sins to all the nations,” Luke 24:47). To speak, then, of Luke omitting this material won’t do. A clear echo of Matthew’s resurrection story is present in Luke, and it is striking that the echo is at the most Luke-friendly juncture, the command to disciple (Matthew) or preach (Luke) to all the nations” (The Case Against Q, 58).

The close juxtaposition of the exhortation to do things “in the [divine] name” for “all the nations” is a noteworthy indicator that one of these Evangelists worked with the other in front of him at the end of his Gospel.

Since the same juxtaposition could have been created independently, due to narrative forces in the text, this is not certain, but it is probable.

Given Luke’s tossup approach to uniquely Matthean material, it could easily indicate that Luke used Matthew.

Or it could indicate the reverse . . .

 

If Matthew Used Luke

Matthew and Mark

If Matthew had Luke’s Gospel in front of him when he composed his own then the first pericope—(a), Matt. 24:1-8—is easy to account for, since it would have been Matthew’s rewriting of Mark 16:1-8.

In fact, Matthew’s use of Mark may have continued beyond this point if there was an original, longer ending to Mark and if Matthew had access to it. At the point where Mark’s narrative cuts off in the shorter ending, the women have just been instructed to tell the disciples that Jesus will see them in Galilee (Mark 16:7), as he previously indicated (Mark 14:28).

Both of these verses are paralleled in Matthew, who also has the women instructed to tell the disciples to see Jesus in Galilee (Matt. 28:7), as Jesus previously indicated (Matt. 26:32).

Given these instructions, the narrative in both Mark and Matthew would naturally go on to indicate that the women told the disciples, who then had an encounter with Jesus in Galilee.

That is, in fact, what we find in Matthew (Matt. 28:8, 16-20). The only additions to this are the report of the guards (Matt. 28:11-15) and a brief encounter with Jesus as the women are going to tell the disciples, in which they meet the risen Lord, worship him, and are again instructed to tell the disciples to meet him in Galilee (Matt. 28:9-10).

Given the absence of the placing of the guards in Mark, the account of their report would be something Matthew would have supplied, but the brief meeting with the women is something that could have been present in an original, lost ending of Mark.

We therefore should consider the possibility that Matthew’s Resurrection Narrative is essentially an edited version of Mark’s original ending with the addition of the material involving the guards.

If so, Matthew simply continued his practice of including virtually everything in Mark and supplementing it with only selected bits of Luke. (Also, this possibility would mean that the reference to the disciples doing things “in the [divine] name” for “all the nations” may have been in Mark’s original ending, in which case Luke could have picked it up from there rather than from Matthew.)

But suppose this is not the case. Suppose that Mark’s original, longer ending (if there was one) had already been lost by the time Matthew wrote, and so his use of Mark stopped at Matthew 28:8. How compelling would Matthew have found the remaining material in Luke’s Resurrection Narrative?

 

The Women

Luke has a brief account of what the women did after they left the tomb (Luke 24:9-11). In this account, the women tell the disciples what happened (v. 9), several of the women are identified by name (v. 10), and they are not initially believed (v. 11).

None of this would have been particularly compelling to Matthew. He has already indicated that the women went to tell the disciples (Matt. 28:8), he has already named some of the women (Matt. 28:1), and he elsewhere notes the doubts of the disciples (and in an even more startling place; Matt. 28:17).

 

Peter

Luke also indicates (Luke 24:12) that Peter ran to the tomb and found it empty.

Given Matthew’s interest in Peter—as illustrated by his inclusion of the “You are Peter” tradition (Matt. 16:17-19)—we might expect him to include this from Luke.

However, Matthew’s interest in Peter can be overestimated. He wasn’t uniquely interested in Peter in a way Luke and John weren’t, as both of them include parallels that make the same basic point as the “You are Peter” tradition (Luke 22:31-32, John 21:15-17).

More decisively, we can show that Matthew was not interested in highlighting Peter in his Resurrection Narrative. We know this because he omitted a reference to Peter that was in front of him in Mark. The instruction the angel gave the women there was, “Go, tell his disciples and Peter that he is going before you to Galilee” (Mark 16:7), but Matthew edits this to, “Go quickly and tell his disciples that he has risen from the dead, and behold, he is going before you to Galilee” (Matt. 28:7).

Having deliberately omitted a reference to Peter from Mark’s Resurrection Narrative, Matthew would hardly have been likely to include Luke’s reference to Peter’s inconsequential visit to the empty tomb.

 

The Road to Emmaus

The encounter on the road to Emmaus is a favorite—a heartwarming story that illustrates Jesus’ playful and mysterious sides—but would Matthew have found it compelling enough to take into his Resurrection Narrative?

Probably not.

First, the story is very lengthy, comprising a full 23 verses (Luke 24:13-35), making it just two verses shorter than Matthew’s entire Resurrection Narrative! Having included parallels to 90% of Mark, Matthew finds space at a premium, and the story would need to have significant value for him to include it.

Second, no major doctrines or disciples are involved. In fact, one of the disciples is entirely unnamed, and the other (Cleopas) is someone we know very little about. If Matthew has just omitted a reference to Peter—the rock on which Jesus said he would build his Church—then he is scarcely likely to find this an essential story.

Third, and most importantly, the encounter at Emmaus occurs just outside Jerusalem—not in Galilee, where Matthew’s narrative has three times indicated Jesus will see the disciples (Matt. 26:32, 28:7, 10).

Consequently, it is easy to see why Matthew would leave his default decision to omit material from Luke in place for this event.

 

Jesus Appears to the Eleven

The account of the Emmaus encounter leads directly into an appearance that Jesus makes to the Eleven, and there are several reasons why Matthew would not have viewed this material as fitting his purposes.

First, the encounter takes place in Jerusalem, and Matthew has set his face to go to Galilee to meet the resurrected Christ.

Second, a good bit of the encounter deals with Jesus letting the disciples handle him and eating fish in front of them to prove he is not a ghost (Luke 24:36-43)—points Matthew easily could have considered unnecessary to make given the space they take.

Third, Luke is recording traditions that set up the readers for the book of Acts, with its preaching of the Gospel “beginning from Jerusalem” (Luke 24:47), whereas Matthew is headed to Galilee.

Fourth, in Luke Jesus specifically tells the disciples, “stay in the city, until you are clothed with power from on high” (Luke 24:49). This would directly fly in the face of the trip to Galilee that Matthew is planning.

One part of the narrative that would be congenial to Matthew’s purposes would be the general evangelistic instruction to do things “in the [divine] name” for “all the nations”—and this is reflected in Matthew (28:19), so Matthew may have been influenced by Luke’s text here.

 

The Ascension

The final part of Luke’s Resurrection Narrative is a brief account of the Ascension. This is such a compelling event that we might expect Matthew to pick it up from Luke, but this expectation is mistaken.

Matthew would not have been dependent on Luke for knowledge of the Ascension. It’s not like he would have read it for the first time in Luke’s Gospel and thought, “Oh, wow! You mean Jesus ascended into heaven? That’s awesome! I have to let my readers know about that!”

Knowledge of the Ascension was widespread—indeed, universal—in the early Christian community, and is referred to elsewhere in the New Testament (cf. John 20:17, Rom. 8:34, Eph. 1:20, Col. 3:1, Heb. 1:3, 1 Peter 3:22, etc.).

Knowledge of the Ascension was an essential part of the Christian message. If Jesus had been raised from the dead, where was he now? Not walking the streets of Jerusalem or Capernaum.

And if Matthew is scrupulous about showing that Jesus’ body could not have been stolen, he certainly understood—and expected his readers to understand—that Jesus’ body was not to be found anywhere on earth, alive or otherwise.

His decision not to include the Ascension was therefore a deliberate choice, influenced in part by the fact that the tradition that Jesus ascended was universally known—and, undoubtedly, also influenced by the fact that it was recorded as taking place in the vicinity of Jerusalem (Luke 24:50-53) rather than Matthew’s destination of Galilee.

 

Conclusion

We thus do not see the Resurrection Narratives providing compelling evidence that Matthew and Luke must have worked independently.

There are no compelling reasons why Luke would have included material found in Matthew’s narrative—and there are reasons why he definitely would not have included some of it.

The matter is even stronger if Matthew used Luke’s Gospel. Not only does he have a strong preference against picking up most Lukan material, but the contents of Luke’s Resurrection Narrative are particularly ill-suited to his purposes.

We do, however, see some indication that one Evangelist may have used the other, given the way both Gospels end with Jesus urging the apostles to do things “in the [divine] name” for “all the nations.” Unless both Evangelists are using a now-lost ending to Mark, this points toward one using the other.

The Resurrection Narratives thus do not give us reason to think that there was a lost Q source.

17:00

"True or false pope?" - Book review on work refuting Sedevacantism [RORATE CÆLI]

The following brief book review on this work that refutes the error of Sedevacantism was written for Rorate by Fr. François Laisney who, among many other things, was the former United States District Superior for the Priestly Society of St. Pius X (SSPX):


By Fr. François Laisney (SSPX):

I have read the whole book – much to my satisfaction. This book addresses each and every argument of sedevacantists, and adequately refutes it! The arguments are solid and cogent.  

One of the authors is an attorney, who by his professional training is used to strict reasoning, and both authors employ this strict and logical reasoning throughout the book. Their honesty and thoroughness is a great value for this book. It is a very thorough and very well documented book, solidly grounded in the doctrine of the Magisterium of all times and of the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, as well as Catholic theologians.

Given the fact that, at the root of sedevacantism, there is often pride, even such solid arguments still need much prayer in order to obtain the light of grace touching their heart and souls, so that with this grace they will be able to correct themselves. This is indeed the first goal of this book, to help many of them to correct their erroneous position, a position that puts their own faith in great danger and ultimately their eternal salvation. So we pray that this excellent book have many good fruits of conversions.

Yet this book is useful for others. First it is highly useful to those who might be tempted by sedevacantism, in order to enable them to reject it right away for its many flaws. Secondly it is of great help for all Catholics in general, to help them understand better the present crisis of the Church, and the true Traditional position. It will remain the reference book on sedevacantism for many years to come.


For orders outside the U.S., please email bookstore@stas.org or call (507) 453-5760 to make a purchase.

For more information on the book from the website of the authors, click here

16:41

BREAKING: “The Pope Video” removed [AKA Catholic]

Apparently, after more than 8,000 views, the masterminds of “The Pope Video” have decided that my rendition offering a more proper translation of the apostasy therein must be suppressed. I just received the following notice from Vimeo: “We removed your video because a third party claims that it infringes a copyright that the third party owns or has the right to enforce.” It’s not clear whether this action was instigated by the Pope World Prayer Network – Apostleship of Prayer, (the Jesuit group that produced the wretched thing) or someone at the Holy See, but it would seem that these are more »

16:17

Il card. Joseph Ratzinger e l'Occidente che patologicamente odia se stesso, 13 maggio 2004 (YouTube) [Il Blog di Raffaella. Riflessioni e commenti fra gli Amici di Benedetto XVI]

LINK DIRETTO SU YOUTUBE Grazie a Gemma riscopriamo oggi un testo dell'allora cardinale Ratzinger. Definirlo profetico è riduttivo. Oggi persino i media laicisti sottoscriverebbero molte delle considerazioni fatte dal futuro Benedetto XVI nel maggio 2004. Vediamo ed ascoltiamo il contenuto di questo video ma leggiamo anche il testo integrale. Il 13 maggio 2004, un anno prima di diventare Papa,

16:03

Du Bräutigam der Kirche [Denzinger-Katholik]



Laus tibi, Christe,
sponso sponsae,
laus in te
trinitati sanctae

Lob sei dir, Christus König,
du Bräutigam der Kirche, 
mit dir zugleich sei Ehre
der heiligen Dreifaltigkeit

Quia mundi sator
salus es et 
reparator

Du bist der Welten Sämann,
ihr Heil und ihr Erneurer,

Rebus dans singulis
tuae umbras
imaginis

du gibst den Dingen allen
den Schatten deines Ebenbilds. (...)

Quem pater tunc per te
in pneumate
voluit, fecit,
fovit machinam,
creatae,
formatae
distinguis, pingis
speciem variam.

Der Vater hat im Geist durch dich
einstmals gewollt, gegründet
das ganze Weltgefüge
und alles Weltgetriebe;
als es sodann geschaffen
und neugeformt dein harrte;
der Dinge Vielgestalten
darin geordnet und geschmückt.

Tibi corpus aptans
ecclesiae,
palmites viti,
membra capiti,
sordentem,
marcentem
tu fide mundas,
spiritu vegetas.

Du fügtest dir zur Einheit an
den Leib der heiligen Kirche,
wie Reben an dem Weinstock,
wie Glieder zu dem Haupte;
und weil die Braut noch leidet
an Flecken und an Schwäche,
schaffst du sie rein im Glauben
und wirkst sie lebensstark im Geist.

Aus dem Hymnus zur Epiphanieoktav des Gottschalk von Limburg-Aachen in der Übertragung nach J. van Acken: Germanische Frömmigkeit in liturgischen Hymnen. Freiburg i. Br.: Caritasverlag 1937, S. 86f. Das lateinische Original ist den Analecta Hymnica (Bd. L, no. 273) entnommen.
Bild: Aus der Kathedrale de Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, Asunción Paraguay.

15:48

George Weigel TimeWarp [Creative Minority Report]

I must admit that I got a kick out of reading George Weigel today over at First Things. For me, it was like a blogging flashback, a flashback to a much simpler time.

George Weigel has a perfectly fine post with which I disagree little. Using the documents of Vatican II, he argues that priests should not be doing ad libs during the mass and that, get this, when they do, it is distracting.

It reminded me of a simpler time for me, circa 2007. Back when I thought that abuses of the Novus Ordo were a big deal and that perhaps priests that abuse it might still listen to reason. I know, right?

I used to write posts like that all the time and people seemed to like them. But now, here in 2016, in the post double-barreled synod of doom and when absolutely nutty un-Catholic things that come out of Bishop's mouths almost every single day even including the Bishop of Rome, in a time where the very bulwark of the Truth is undermined daily, it is hard to remember why I cared so much about the Novus Ordo.

It isn't so much that Weigel is wrong. He isn't. But it just seems to me that he is arguing about how many inches hemlines should be below the knee when everyone has already moved to a nudist colony.


*subhead*Late to the party.*subhead*

15:32

Hammer of the Arians [Siris]

Today is the memorial of St. Hilary of Poitiers, Doctor of the Church. Here is part of his account, from his book on the Trinity, of how he, originally a pagan Neoplatonist, became Christian:

I believe that the mass of mankind have spurned from themselves and censured in others this acquiescence in a thoughtless, animal life, for no other reason than that nature herself has taught them that it is unworthy of humanity to hold themselves born only to gratify their greed and their sloth, and ushered into life for no high aim of glorious deed or fair accomplishment, and that this very life was granted without the power of progress towards immortality; a life, indeed, which then we should confidently assert did not deserve to be regarded as a gift of God, since, racked by pain and laden with trouble, it wastes itself upon itself from the blank mind of infancy to the wanderings of age. I believe that men, prompted by nature herself, have raised themselves through teaching and practice to the virtues which we name patience and temperance and forbearance, under the conviction that right living means right action and right thought, and that Immortal God has not given life only to end in death; for none can believe that the Giver of good has bestowed the pleasant sense of life in order that it may be overcast by the gloomy fear of dying.

And yet, though I could not tax with folly and uselessness this counsel of theirs to keep the soul free from blame, and evade by foresight or elude by skill or endure with patience the troubles of life, still I could not regard these men as guides competent to lead me to the good and happy Life. Their precepts were platitudes, on the mere level of human impulse; animal instinct could not fail to comprehend them, and he who understood but disobeyed would have fallen into an insanity baser than animal unreason. Moreover, my soul was eager not merely to do the things, neglect of which brings shame and suffering, but to know the God and Father Who had given this great gift, to Whom, it felt, it owed its whole self, Whose service was its true honour, on Whom all its hopes were fixed, in Whose lovingkindness, as in a safe home and haven, it could rest amid all the troubles of this anxious life. It was inflamed with a passionate desire to apprehend Him or to know Him....

While my mind was dwelling on these and on many like thoughts, I chanced upon the books which, according to the tradition of the Hebrew faith, were written by Moses and the prophets, and found in these words spoken by God the Creator testifying of Himself 'I Am that I Am, and again, He that is has sent me unto you.' I confess that I was amazed to find in them an indication concerning God so exact that it expressed in the terms best adapted to human understanding an unattainable insight into the mystery of the Divine nature.

One of the quirks of his career was that he was a married bishop; many episcopal sees in those days were filled by popular acclamation, and when the people of Poitiers wanted him as their new bishop, he was practically forced to accept, despite being married and having a daughter. He became a bulwark against Arianism in the West, and had a very uneven career in attempting to oppose it. But out of his failures as well as his successes came the works that made him, in Augustine's words, an illustrious teacher of the churches. He was recognized as a Doctor of the Church by Pius IX in 1851.

15:29

GENERAL AUDIENCE: On Mercy [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Papal Audience to Christian Union of Italian Business Executives (UCID), Paul VI Audience Hall, 31st of October 2015

'How lovely is this description of God! Everything is here, because God is great and powerful, but His greatness and power are displayed in loving us, we who are so little, so incapable.'

Read more

15:17

Newman and Dawkins [Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment]

As a Catholic, Newman believed that the Church of England was a bulwark against Infidelity. Dr Dawkins has now started worrying about the decline of Christianity because it is a bulwark against Islam.

15:02

Austrian Bishop: "Even Jesus Struggled at First Learning Diversity" [The Eponymous Flower]


Edit: Bishop Schwarz is an advocate for married clergy as a solution to the "abuse crisis" and We Are Church, among others.
(Vienna) The crisis of the Church is not least described as a crisis of the bishops. This includes the pandering to the Zeitgeist and political power. Currently, the especially unconditional support of mass immigration, including concomitant Islamization of Europe is at a premium. Any means seems acceptable to justify it, even the degradation of Jesus Christ, true God and true man, to an arbitrarily bendable decal. 
A  bonmot in new speak and Episcopal confusion, which is a "delicacy" in Austria, was recently uttered by the Austrian Bishop of Gurk- Klagenfurt, Msgr. Alois Schwarz.
On January 7, he gave the opening speech at the Pastoral Conference 2016 Austrian Pastoral Institute (ÖPI) in Salzburg. "Pluralism in Society and the Church" was the politically correct topic.
As Kathpress, the news agency of the Austrian Bishops' Conference and the website of the Diocese of Gurk-Klagenfurt reported, the bishop addressed some 300 people with: "Even Jesus struggled at first  learning diversity." 
Jesus supposedly was obliged  "to learn" what "was   beyond the borders of the chosen people of Israel,  'to open up to and acknowledge strangers for their approach to salvation," said the bishop. "God strengthened in fact, 'abided diversity,'" quoted Kathpress. Bishop Schwarz  described a "learning process" of Jesus. Jesus is supposed to have [...] "learned, 'to be available to everyone' and to allow diversity',  said  Schwarz.."
Text: Giuseppe Nardi 
Image: kath-kirche-kaernten.at (Screenshot)
Trans: Tancred vekron99@hotmail.com
AMDG

14:55

Speaker Paul Ryan with his State of the Union guests [The Badger Catholic]



HT acardnal

14:48

Fabro Symposium at CUA, April 1-2 [News - thomistica]

Father Dreyer of the Institute of the Incarnate Word has announced that there will be a Fabro Symposium at CUA on April 1-2.  It looks great.  You can find more information about it here:

 http://www.iveamerica.org/images/fabro/institute-of-the-incarnate-word-Fabro-Symposium-Poster.jpg

 

14:14

More Amazing News! BENEFACTOR **TUESDAYS** NOW IN EFFECT! [Barnhardt]

Ann,

I offer the TLM (Traditional Latin Mass) publicly every weekday, with a few exceptions. I will commit to Tuesday mornings at 0830 EST.As you know, the Canon allows for ‘N and N’ at the Memento for the living, so I think it would be appropriate to name you and your benefactors each Tuesday.

I am committing to this because I have been given a mighty weapon in the war that is not against flesh and blood, and therefore I also have a grave responsibility to wield it in the day of battle. I am determined to stand my ground at the foot of Calvary and there – at the Altar – fight with Him, suffer with Him and die with Him (God helping me). Ann, the crucifixion approaches, and the perplexing desolation of Psalm 21 awaits the broken Body of Christ, especially every Alter Christus.

Note also that I am committing to offering the TLM for you and your benefactors in partial return for your having taught me to ‘put my elbows down’. You know, the one about… (Why Priests Can Only Ever Be Men).

“See” you next Tuesday.
FrP

—***—

So there you go.  Every Tuesday at 0830 Eastern, the Holy and August Sacrifice of the Mass in the Venerable Gregorian Rite will be offered for you, my Benefactors.

Elbows down.

Elbows down.

14:06

Faithfulness in mercy is God's way of being, pope says [CNS Top Stories]

IMAGE: CNS/Paul Haring

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- God's mercy is constant and limitless; he is faithful in his mercy for his children, even when they are unfaithful, Pope Francis said.

The greatness and power of God unfolds in his "love for us, who are so small, so incapable," he said at his weekly general audience Jan. 13.

In his first general audience of the new year, the pope began a new series of talks on mercy, reflecting on its description in the Bible, where from the "Old Testament to the full revelation of Jesus Christ, the mercy of the Father is revealed in its completeness."

Speaking to some 6,000 people gathered in the Paul VI audience hall, the pope began by reflecting on the biblical description of God who is "merciful and gracious, slow to anger and rich in love and faithfulness."

The pope said the Bible compares God's merciful love to the tenderness and love of a mother who seeks "to love, protect, help (and) is quick to give everything, even herself" for her children. "That is the image that this word suggests," he said. It is "a love that can be defined, in a good way, as 'visceral.'"

God's graciousness, he continued, is exemplified in his compassion for the weak and the poor along with his readiness to receive, understand and forgive. This aspect is seen in the father of the prodigal son who did not latch on to resentment against his son, but rather "continued to wait for him."

"Great is his love and joy at having found him again; and then he goes and also calls his oldest son who is indignant and does not want to celebrate, this son who remained at home but lived more like a servant than as a son," the pope said. "But the father stoops down to him as well, inviting him to enter, seeking to open his heart to love, so that none remain excluded from the feast of mercy. Mercy is a feast."

The beauty of God's love and faithfulness shows affection, grace and goodness, he said, and is nothing like the superficiality of a "soap opera love."

"It is love that takes the first step; it does not depend on human merits but on an immense generosity," he said. "It is the divine solicitude that nothing can stop, not even sin because he knows to go beyond sin, to overcome evil and to forgive."

God's mercy and faithfulness, he added, is a stable presence that strengthens faith and gives Christians the opportunity to experience his love, especially during the Holy Year of Mercy.

At the end of the audience, Pope Francis led the faithful in praying for the families and victims of a suicide bomb attack in Istanbul on Jan. 12. The attack claimed the lives of 10 people and left 15 wounded. Turkish officials said the bomber belonged to the so-called Islamic State terrorist group.

The pope prayed that "the Lord, the merciful, give eternal peace to the deceased, comfort to their relatives, firm solidarity to the whole society, and convert the hearts of the violent."

- - -

Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju

- - -

A video to accompany this story can be found at https://youtu.be/eGIThr1VFjU

- - -

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13:56

Starting Wednesday Off Right: Oh, Hilary! Edition [Barnhardt]

Our Father, Who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy Name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

PATER NOSTER, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen.

hilary

“Now it is time to speak, the time for silence is past. We must expect Christ’s return, for the reign of Antichrist has begun. The shepherds must give the warning signals because the hirelings have fled. Let us lay down our lives for the sheep, for brigands have entered the fold and the roaring lion is rampaging about. Be ready for martyrdom! Satan himself is clothed as an angel of light.”

-St. Hilary of Poitiers, Doctor of the Church

13:16

Das Leben siegt! Eine Erklärung Pro-Euthanasie scheitert im EU-Parlament [katholon]

„Schriftliche Erklärung zur Würde des Menschen am Lebensende“

Europaparlament - Plenarsaal Foto: J. Patrick Fischer Quelle: Wikimedia Lizenz: CC-by-sa 3.0/de

Europaparlament – Plenarsaal
Foto: J. Patrick Fischer
Quelle: Wikimedia
Lizenz: CC-by-sa 3.0/de

(Brüssel/PM) Das war der Titel einer schriftlichen Erklärung, die vergangene Woche scheiterte, da sie nicht die erforderliche Mehrheit der Mitglieder des EU-Parlamentes auf sich vereinigen konnte.

Unter Verwendung irreführender Begrifflichkeiten und unter Missachtung des Subsidiaritätsprinzips sagt diese Erklärung:“Alle europäischen Bürger, unabhängig von ihrer Nationalität, die sich in der fortgeschrittenen oder letzten Phase einer unheilbaren Krankheit befinden, was mit unerträglichen physischen oder mentalen Leiden  einher geht, die nicht gelindert werden können, sollten von medizinischem Beistand profitieren können, um ihr Leben in Würde zu beschließen.“ Mit anderen Worten: dies ist eine Erklärung zur Förderung von Euthanasie.

Selbst wenn eine schriftliche Erklärung niemals als offizielle Meinung des EU-Parlamentes interpretiert werden kann, sondern nur als Ausdruck des persönlichen Standpunktes der unterzeichnenden Mitglieder des EU-Parlamentes, ist es doch ermutigend, dass sie die Unterstützung von nur 95 der insgesamt 751 Mitgliedern erhalten hatte.

FAFCE-Präsident Antoine Renard stellt fest:

“Es ist klar, dass die Pro-Euthanasie-Lobby beginnt, im EU-Parlament aktiv zu werden. Das wiederum birgt die Gefahr, dass die Aufmerksamkeit der politischen Entscheidungsträger in Europa von dem abgezogen wird, was die EU tun könnte, um gute Praktiken unter ihren Mitgliedsstaaten in Bezug auf Palliativpflege zu fördern und jene mittels familienunterstützenden Maßnahmen zu unterstützen, die einen Menschen am Ende seines Lebens betreuen. Das Scheitern dieser  Erklärung zeigt, dass die Würde des Menschen nicht ein Schlachtfeld für politische Auseinandersetzungen sein kann und zum Instrument einiger Ideologien werden darf. FAFCE wird auch weiterhin für die Menschenwürde eintreten, und zwar in ihrer wahren Bedeutung, die den Menschen in den Mittelpunkt stellt.“


FAFCE wurde 1997 gegründet und hat partizipatorischen Status beim Europarat. FAFCE vertritt Familienverbände und Familienorganisationen aus 16 europäischen Ländern. Weitere Informationen: http://fafce.org

 

13:10

De Mattei on Francis' Syncretistic Video: "It's Not Only Heresy That Offends the Catholic Faith" [The Eponymous Flower]

[Rorate] In a long interview published on December 30th in the German weekly Die Zeit, Cardinal Ludwig Müller, Prefect for the Congregation of the Faith, raised a question of crucial relevance today. When the interviewer asked the Prefect what he thought of those Catholics who attack the Pope defining him “a heretic”, he replied: “Not only because of my office, but from personal conviction, I must disagree. A heretic in the theological definition, is a Catholic who denies obstinately a revealed truth proposed by the Church that they are obliged to believe. It’s another thing when those who are officially charged to teach the faith express themselves in a somewhat inappropriate, misleading or vague way. The teachings of the Pope and bishops are not above the Word of God, but serve it. (…) Moreover, papal pronouncements have a different binding nature – ranging from a definitive decision pronounced ex-cathedra to a homily which is used rather for spiritual analysis.”

Today there is a tendency to fall into a simplistic dichotomy between heresy and orthodoxy. Cardinal Muller’s words remind us that between black (open heresy) and white (complete orthodoxy) there is a grey area which theologians have explored with precision. [Emphasis ours]

There are doctrinal propositions, even if they are not explicitly heretical, that are condemned by the Church with theological qualifications proportional to their gravity and in their contrast to Catholic doctrine. Opposition to the truth in fact, presents diverse levels, according to whether it is direct or indirect, immediate or remote, open or hidden, and so on. The “theological censures” (not to be confused with ecclesiastical censures or punishments) express, as Father Sisto Cartechini explains in his classical study, the negative judgment of the Church on an expression, an opinion or an entire theological doctrine (Dall’opinione al domma. Valore delle note teologiche (From Opinion to Dogma. The Value of Theological Notes) “La Civiltà Cattolica” Edition, Rome, 1953). This judgment can be private, if given by one or more theologians independently, or public and official, if promulgated by the ecclesiastical authority. 

AMDG

12:58

Pope Prays for Comfort of Victims' Families of Terrorist Attack in Turkey [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Audience 30-12-2015 / 6

Launching Appeal at End of General Audience, Francis Prays for Conversion of Hearts of the Violent

Read more

12:38

General Audience's English-speaking Summary [ZENIT - The World Seen From Rome]

Audience 30-12-2015 / 5

'He waits for us, ever ready to forgive our sins and to welcome us back to a right relationship with him.'

Read more

11:37

De Mattei on the Pope's pronouncements and video: It's not only heresy that offends the Catholic Faith [RORATE CÆLI]

Not Only Heresy Offends The Catholic Faith

Roberto de Mattei
Corrispondenza Romana
January 13, 2016

In a long interview published on December 30th in the German weekly Die Zeit, Cardinal Ludwig Müller, Prefect for the Congregation of the Faith, raised a question of crucial relevance today. When the interviewer asked the Prefect what he thought of those Catholics who attack the Pope defining him “a heretic”, he replied: “Not only because of my office, but from personal conviction, I must disagree. A heretic in the theological definition, is a Catholic who denies obstinately a revealed truth proposed by the Church that they are obliged to believe. It’s another thing when those who are officially charged to teach the faith express themselves in a somewhat inappropriate, misleading or vague way. The teachings of the Pope and bishops are not above the Word of God, but serve it. (…) Moreover, papal pronouncements have a different binding nature – ranging from a definitive decision pronounced ex-cathedra to a homily which is used rather for spiritual analysis.”


Today there is a tendency to fall into a simplistic dichotomy between heresy and orthodoxy. Cardinal Muller’s words remind us that between black (open heresy) and white (complete orthodoxy) there is a grey area which theologians have explored with precision.

There are doctrinal propositions, even if they are not explicitly heretical, that are condemned by the Church with theological qualifications proportional to their gravity and in their contrast to Catholic doctrine. Opposition to the truth in fact, presents diverse levels, according to whether it is direct or indirect, immediate or remote, open or hidden, and so on. The “theological censures” (not to be confused with ecclesiastical censures or punishments) express, as Father Sisto Cartechini explains in his classical study, the negative judgment of the Church on an expression, an opinion or an entire theological doctrine (Dall’opinione al domma. Valore delle note teologiche (From Opinion to Dogma. The Value of Theological Notes) “La Civiltà Cattolica” Edition, Rome, 1953). This judgment can be private, if given by one or more theologians independently, or public and official, if promulgated by the ecclesiastical authority.

Cardinal Pietro Parente and Monsignor Antonio’s Dogmatic Theological Dictionary sums up the doctrine thus: “The censure formulas are many, with a gradation which goes from the minimum to the maximum. Three categories can be grouped: the First Category: regards the doctrinal content a proposition can be censured as: a) heretical, if it openly opposes a truth of faith defined as such by the Church; according to the greater or lesser opposition the proposition can be said to be near heresy, that it smacks of heresy; b) erroneous in the faith, if it is opposed to a grave theological conclusion which derives from a revealed truth and a principle of reason; if it is opposed to a simple common sentence among Theologians, the proposition is censured as temerarious. The Second Category: regards the defective form for which the proposition is judged equivocal, dubious, insidious, suspect, evil-sounding etc., even if not contradicting any truth of faith from a doctrinal point of view. The Third Category: regards the effects that can be produced in particular circumstances in time or place, even if not erroneous in content and form. In such a case, the proposition is censured as perverse, corrupt, scandalous, dangerous, seductive for the simple ” (Dictionary of Dogmatic Theology, Studium, Rome, 1943, pp. 45-46). In all of these cases Catholic truth lacks doctrinal integrity or is expressed in a deficient and improper manner.

This precision in qualifying errors was developed mainly between the XVII and XVIII centuries, when the Church found Herself faced with the first heresy which fought to remain internal: Jansenism. The Jansenist strategy, just like the modernists’ later on, was that of continuing to self-proclaim their complete orthodoxy, despite repeated condemnations. In order to avoid an accusation of heresy, they engineered themselves into finding ambiguous and equivocal formulas of faith and morals, which did not frontally oppose the Catholic faith and allowed them to remain in the Church. With the same accuracy and determination the orthodox theologians individualized Jansenism’s errors, branding them according to their specific characteristics.

Pope Clement XI in the Bull Unigenitus Dei Filius of September 8th 1713, censured 101 propositions in the book Réflexions morales by the Jansenist theologian Pasquier Quesnel, as, among other things: false, captious, evil-sounding, offensive to pious ears, scandalous, pernicious, rash, injurious to the Church and her practice, insulting to the Church […]suspected of heresy, and smacking of heresy itself, and, besides, favoring heretics, heresies and also schisms, erroneous and close to heresy” (Denz.-H, n. 2502).

In his turn, Pius VI in the Bull Auctorem fidei of August 28th, condemned eighty-five propositions, extracts from the Acts of the Jansenist Synod of Pistoia (1786). Some of these propositions from the Synod are expressly qualified as heretical, but others are defined, according to the cases: schismatic, suspected of heresy, inducing heresy, favouring heretics, false, erroneous, pernicious, scandalous, temerarious, injurious to the common practice of the Church (Denz.H, nn. 2600-2700). Each one of these terms has a different significance. Thus the proposition in which the Synod professes: “to be persuaded that the Bishop has received from Jesus Christ all the rights necessary for the good government of the Church” independently of the Pope and Councils (n.6), is “erroneous” and induces schism and subversion to the ecclesiastical hierarchal regime”; the one in which limbo is rejected (n. 26), is considered “false, temerarious, offensive to Catholic schools; the proposition that prohibits placing relics or flowers on the altars (n.32) is said to be: temerarious, injurious to the pious and recognized customs of the Church”; the one, that hopes for a return to the archaic rudiments of the liturgy, “ with the restoring of greater simplicity to the rites, expressing it in vulgar language, and uttering it loudly” (n.33). is defined as “temerarious, offensive to pious ears, insulting to the Church, favoring the slander of heretics against the Church Herself.”

An analysis of the final Relatio of the 2015 Synod of Bishops, conducted according to the principles of Catholic theology and morals, can do nothing other than find grave disconformities in that document. Many of its propositions could be defined as evil-sounding, erroneous, temerarious and so on, even if no-one can say that it is formally heretical.

More recently, on January 6th 2016, a video-message from Pope Francis diffused all over the world’s social networks, was dedicated to inter-religious dialogue, where Catholics, Buddhists, Jews and Muslims seem to be placed on the same level, as “children of (a) God” whom everyone encounters in their own religion, in the name of some common profession of faith and love. Francis’ words, combined with those of the protagonists in the video and above all with the images, are the vehicle of a syncretistic message which contradicts, at least indirectly, the teaching as regards the redeeming uniqueness and universality of Jesus Christ and the Church, reaffirmed in the encyclical Mortalium Animos by Pius XI (1928) and the Declaration Dominus Iesus by the then Prefect for the Congregation of the Faith, Joseph Ratzinger (August 6th 2000).

As ordinary baptized Catholics wishing to apply the theological censures of the Church to this video, we should have to define it as: inducing heresy as far as the content is concerned; equivocal and insidious as far as the form is concerned; scandalous as far as its effects on souls are concerned. The public and official judgment is up to the ecclesiastical authorities and nobody better than the present Prefect for the Congregation of the Faith, has the qualification to speak in this regard.

Many distressed Catholics are calling on him to do just that.

[Translation: Contributor Francesca Romana]

11:34

Nothing can stop God's mercy – not even sin, Pope says [CNA Daily News - Vatican]

Vatican City, Jan 13, 2016 / 04:34 am (CNA/EWTN News).- On Wednesday Pope Francis launched a new series of catechesis on mercy for his general audiences, telling pilgrims that the love and forgiveness of God can’t be overcome by anything, including our sin.

“In the Book of Exodus, God defines himself as the God of mercy.  This is his name, through which he reveals to us his face and his heart,” the Pope said in his Jan 13 general audience.

The description of God as being “steadfast in love and faithfulness” is beautiful, he said, adding that this description “says everything. Because God is great and powerful, but this greatness and power unfold in loving us, so little, so incapable.”

Used in this way, the word love indicates an attitude of affection, grace and goodness, he said, distinguishing this from the type of superficial love we see in soap operas.

It’s always love that “makes the first step, that doesn't depend on human merits but gives an immense gratuity,” he said, adding that “nothing can stop divine solicitude, not even sin, because it knows how to go beyond sin, overcoming evil and forgiving it.”

Pope Francis spoke to pilgrims gathered in the Vatican’s Paul VI Hall for his weekly general audience. This week he began a new series of catechesis dedicated to mercy according to the bible, a decision he said he made so that we can “learn mercy by listening to what God himself teaches us with his word.”

After listening to the day’s reading from Exodus, the Pope pointed to how God tells Moses that he is “the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.”

These words are echoed throughout the Old Testament, he said, noting that the same formula is found in other texts. Although the variations are different, “always the emphasis is put on mercy and on the love of God who never tires of forgiving.”



Francis said that when referring to God, the word “mercy” evokes an attitude of tenderness, much like the kind a mother shows toward her children.

“The image is that of a God who is moved and softens for us like a mother when she takes her child in her arms, desiring only to love, protect, help and is ready to give everything, even herself. A love, then, that can be defined in a good way as 'visceral,'” he said.

He noted how God is also referred to as “compassionate,” and that it is out of this compassion that the Lord in his greatness “bends down to whoever is weak and poor, always ready to welcome, to understand and to forgive.”

Pope Francis then referred to the parable of the Prodigal Son. After the younger son took his inheritance and squandered it, the father never abandoned him or closed himself in resentment, but continued to wait for his return.

Once the younger son came back, the father ran to meet him and embraced him, Francis said, explaining that “so great was the love and joy for having found him again, (the father) didn't even allow him to finish his confession – it's like he covered his mouth.”

Then the father called the older son and invited him in to the celebration. Even though the older son is bitter, the father “tries to open his heart to love, because no one is excluded from the feast of mercy,” the Pope observed.

Francis noted how this same merciful God is described as being “slow to anger,” and is willing to wait patiently, like a wise farmer who waits for his crop, for the seeds of repentance to grow in our hearts.

“God is totally and always reliable. He is a solid and stable presence. This is the certainty of our faith.”

Pope Francis closed his address by praying that during the Jubilee of Mercy, all would entrust themselves entirely to the Lord, “and experience the joy of being loved by this God who is merciful and compassionate, slow to anger and great in love and faithfulness.”

After greeting pilgrims present from various countries around the world, the Pope offered special prayers for the victims and families of yesterday’s suicide bombing near the famous Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

At least 10 people were killed and several injured when a suicide bomber, identified as a Syrian, blew himself up in Istanbul’s Sultanahmet district, which is near the Blue Mosque. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack.

In his comments, Pope Francis invited faithful to pray for the victims, and asked that the merciful God “give eternal peace to the deceased, comfort to the families, firm solidarity to society as a whole,” and that he “convert the hearts of the violent.”

  (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk')); Watch: Pope Francis was shocked to see this old friend at today's General Audience in Rome! <3 :D

Posted by Catholic News Agency on Wednesday, January 13, 2016

11:27

Explanation and Experience [Dominicana]

A parent will usually allow his children to learn from their own mistakes when it doesn’t involve considerable danger. Trying to tie their shoes when they’ve yet to acquire that skill or attempting to reach a shelf still too high for them teaches children to ask for help. When I was learning to drive, my […]

11:27

Juventutem Mass in London, Fri 29th Jan [LMS Chairman]

I'm delighted to pass on the details of the Juventutem Mass which will take place, as usual, in St Mary Moorfields in the City of London, on the last Friday of January, 29th, at 7:30pm. It will be followed by a social gathering with food (pizza) in the basement of the church. (Linke to the Facebook event page.)

It will be High Mass with polyphony; the celebrant will be Fr Stephen Morrison O.Praem, the Chaplain of Juventutem London; he will be assisted by Fr Ian Verrier FSSP and Fr Cyril Law.

As always the Mass is sponsored by the Latin Mass Society, and with the kind permission of Canon Peter Newby, the Parish Priest.

These Masses are being arranged for every 'last Friday' of the calendar year, so if you can make St Mary Moorfields make a note of the dates. The postcode is EC2M 7LS (click for a map).



Support the work of the LMS by becoming an 'Anniversary Supporter'.

11:16

What if the consequences are an eternity in Hell? [Zippy Catholic]

I pointed out a while back that to associate yourself with the neoreaction is – according to the neoreaction itself – to deny God. The neoreaction itself insists that neoreaction shall be explicitly anti-explicitly-Christian. Christ simply must not be permitted to matter; indeed the very name of Christ is associated with the enemy.

But that’s OK, because under alt-right ethics what matters isn’t whether you are doing good or evil. Any action can be justified as long as it has desirable consequences. Presumably this includes denying God. If you aren’t a moral consequentialist you are just a contemptible normie:

This distinction and concept needs to be understood in the alt right, because most of us are consequentialists (whether we understand the distinction or not) while most normies probably believe in deontological principles.

There are of course many examples that can be used to prove the correctness of consequentialism over deontological ethics. For instance, is it wrong to murder (most would admit that this is a worse action than discriminating based on race)? Most people will say yes. Yet most people would agree that murdering baby Hitler in the crib would be a moral action because it would save many more lives. If you can get them to admit to this (or any number of hypothetical scenarios where actions that they consider morally wrong lead to such undeniably desirable consequences to the point that they have to admit that the action in that specific circumstance must be moral) then they have given up the principle. Then explain to them that it is consequences that determine the moral value of an action and not some inherency to the action. Hopefully the scales will fall from their eyes and they will adopt consequentialism. Then you can start having a conversation without having the other guy dismissing your arguments in favor of certain actions due to the actions being counter to his deontological moral principles.


11:13

Nur eine Anmerkung [totaliter aliter]

Das Internet und die sozialen Medien machen es unmöglich, die Hysterie, die Überreaktionen und die Peinlichkeiten aus der Debatte herauszuhalten. Natürlich ist nicht das Internet selbst hysterisch, überreagierend und peinlich, sondern es sind die Menschen. Aber ebenso wie bei den Schußwaffen (Das "Guns don't kill people, people do!" wird zumindest in den USA mit jedem "Unfall" stärker hinterfragt) muß man dem Internet schon seine Rolle zugestehen in der Shitstormnormalität dieser Tage.

Es muß nur irgendwo "Ausländer", "Moslem", "Flüchtling", "Migrationshintergrund" oder "Asylbewerber" draufstehen, und man darf ziemlich sicher sein, daß der Inhalt eine bunte Mischung aus Schuldzuweisung, Anmache, Propaganda, Polemik, Verallgemeinerung, Weltuntergangsszenario und Gegeifere ist.

Ebenso wie bei den Delikten selbst eine Minderheit plötzlich den Blick auf die Gesamtgruppe diktiert, teilt das Getobe einer Minderheit im Internet plötzlich alle an der Debatte beteiligten in "Rechte", "Linke", "Gutmenschen", "Ausländerhasser", "Realitätsverweigerer", "Islamfeinde", "Verharmloser", "Scharfmacher", um mal ein paar zu nennen.

Dem "Wenn Du dunkle Augen und Haare und einen Akzent hast, dann bist Du Islamist und Frauenvergewaltiger!" entspricht das "Wenn Du bzgl der Einwanderungspolitik Fragen/Kommentare hast, dann bist du - je nach Stoßrichtung der Frage/des Kommentars - entweder ein haßerfüllter Nazi oder ein blauäugiger Gutmensch!"

Es ist in diesen Tagen für einen normalen, handelsüblichen Internet-Bewohner, der weder mit rechtem noch mit linkem Extremismus etwas am Hut hat, nicht einfach, in den sozialen Medien seine Stimme zu erheben. Denn je nach dem, was für Inhalte er veröffentlicht, wird er entweder als Naziratte oder als Linkenzecke beschimpft, möglicherweise gar als beides, weil er jeweils einer Seite zu sehr in die Richtung der anderen Seite zu tendieren scheint.

Ich halte es daher im Moment für wenig zielführend, mich zu dem Thema zu äußern.

Nur eine Anmerkung brennt mir auf der Zunge: Ich lese immer und immer wieder, daß die Sylvesternacht in Köln der Augenblick war, der Deutschland verändern wird. Ist dies wirklich der Fall? Ich denke, diese Nacht (und die auf sie folgenden Reaktionen) war viel mehr der Augenblick, der gezeigt hat, wie sehr sich Deutschland bereits verändert hat. Das meine ich jetzt ganz nüchtern, ohne dabei in irgendeine Richtung austeilen zu wollen und ohne jeden Weltuntergangs-Unterton oder Zukunftspanik-Beigeschmack.

10:49

Misspelled Words [Laudator Temporis Acti]

F.D. How, Six Great Schoolmasters, 2nd ed. (London: Methuen & Co., 1905), pp. 246-247 (on George Granville Bradley, the Bradley of "Bradley's Arnold" Latin Prose Composition):

The present writer can supply another example from his own experience. He had to take a "leave of absence" for a particular Tuesday, to be signed by Bradley. He was then a small boy, and spelt two important words thus: "Teusday" and "abscence." He will never forget the sting of the tone in which he was asked where he had been at school, nor the master's voice saying, "Leave it on my mantelpiece, for the little children in my nursery to scoff at it!"
Related post: Spelling.

10:36

CFP: Meta-Philosophy of Religion & Meta-Theology [The Prosblogion]

META-PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION & META-THEOLOGY We are delighted to announce the new journal TheoLogica, a peer-reviewed international journal. TheoLogica is a multidisciplinary research journal focused on philosophy of religion and theology (analytic theology, natural theology, philosophical theology), exploring philosophical and theological topics with the standards of conceptual clarity and rigorous argumentation, which are recognized (in particular but not exclusively) [...]

10:33

The True Philosophy of Life? [Laudator Temporis Acti]

Ernest Renan (1823-1892), Recollections of My Youth, tr. C.B. Pitman (London: Chapman and Hall, 1883), p. 137:

I cannot get out of my head the idea that perhaps the libertine is right after all and practises the true philosophy of life.

Je ne peux m'ôter de l'idée que c'est peut-être après tout le libertin qui a raison et qui pratique la vraie philosophie de la vie.

10:23

The Abode of the Gods [Laudator Temporis Acti]

Homer, Odyssey 6.41-46 (tr. Richmond Lattimore):

So the gray-eyed Athene spoke and went away from her
to Olympos, where the abode of the gods stands firm and unmoving
forever, they say, and is not shaken with winds nor spattered
with rains, nor does snow pile ever there, but the shining bright air
stretches cloudless away, and the white light glances upon it.
And there, and all their days, the blessed gods take their pleasure.

ἡ μὲν ἄρ᾽ ὣς εἰποῦσ᾽ ἀπέβη γλαυκῶπις Ἀθήνη
Οὔλυμπόνδ᾽, ὅθι φασὶ θεῶν ἕδος ἀσφαλὲς αἰεὶ
ἔμμεναι. οὔτ᾽ ἀνέμοισι τινάσσεται οὔτε ποτ᾽ ὄμβρῳ
δεύεται οὔτε χιὼν ἐπιπίλναται, ἀλλὰ μάλ᾽ αἴθρη
πέπταται ἀνέφελος, λευκὴ δ᾽ ἐπιδέδρομεν αἴγλη·
τῷ ἔνι τέρπονται μάκαρες θεοὶ ἤματα πάντα.
Lucretius 3.18-22 (tr. W.H.D. Rouse, rev. Martin Ferguson Smith):
Before me appear the gods in their majesty, and their peaceful abodes, which no winds ever shake nor clouds besprinkle with rain, which no snow congealed by the bitter frost mars with its white fall, but the air ever cloudless encompasses them and laughs with its light spread wide abroad.

apparet divum numen sedesque quietae
quas neque concutiunt venti nec nubila nimbis
aspergunt neque nix acri concreta pruina
cana cadens violat semperque innubilus aether
integit, et large diffuso lumine ridet.
Lucan 2.266-271 (tr. J.D. Duff):
Fitter than war for you is peaceful life and tranquil solitude; so the stars of heaven roll on for ever unshaken in their courses. The part of air nearest earth is fired by thunderbolts, and the low-lying places of the world are visited by gales and long flashes of flame; but Olympus rises above the clouds.

                 melius tranquilla sine armis
otia solus ages; sicut caelestia semper
inconcussa suo volvuntur sidera lapsu.
fulminibus propior terrae succenditur aer,
imaque telluris ventos tractusque coruscos
flammarum accipiunt: nubes excedit Olympus.
Seneca, On Anger 3.6.1 (tr. John W. Basore):
The higher region of the universe, being better ordered and near to the stars, is condensed into no cloud, is lashed into no tempest, is churned into no whirlwind; it is free from all turmoil; it is in the lower regions that the lightnings flash.

pars superior mundi et ordinatior ac propinqua sideribus nec in nubem cogitur nec in tempestatem impellitur nec versatur in turbinem; omni tumultu caret, inferiora fulminantur.
Parallels are from J.B. Hainsworth's commentary on the Odyssey (1988; rpt. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990), p. 296. Lucan and Seneca, however, seem to me to be influenced more by the popular science of their day than by Homer.

10:12

Married priests? [Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment]

The Universal Church, Eastern and Western, discerns a particularly close linkage between celibacy and sacerdotium. That is why Bishops, in whom resides the plenitudo Sacerdotii, are everywhere celibate. But the same does not apply with as much force to presbyters. If in the earliest centuries presbyters were required to be celibate, then we must remember that the Church develops her practice and

10:02

How a prostitute's story taught Pope Francis the meaning of mercy [CNA Daily News - Vatican]

Vatican City, Jan 13, 2016 / 03:02 am (CNA/EWTN News).- When Pope Francis was a parish priest in Argentina, he met a mother with young children who had been abandoned by her husband.

She had no steady income. When odd jobs were scarce, she would prostitute herself in order to feed her children and provide for her family. During that time, she would visit the local parish, which tried to help her by offering food and material goods.

One day during the Christmas season the mother visited and requested to see the parish priest, Father Jorge Bergoglio. He thought she was going to thank him for the package of food the parish had sent to her.

"Did you receive it?" Fr. Bergoglio had asked her.

"Yes, yes, thank you for that, too," the mother explained. “But I came here today to thank you because you never stopped calling me Señora."

The Holy Father recalled this touching memory in the sixth chapter of the book The Name of God is Mercy, a newly released book-length interview of Pope Francis by Italian journalist Andrea Tornielli meant to “reveal the heart of Francis and his vision.”

This experience with the young mother profoundly touched Pope Francis, who said it taught him the importance of treating every human person with dignity and mercy, no matter their situation in life.

"Experiences like this teach you how important it is to welcome people delicately and not wound their dignity," Pope Francis stated in the book.

"For her, the fact that the parish priest continued to call her Señora, even though he probably knew how she led her life during the months when she could not work, was as important – or perhaps even more important than – the concrete help that we gave her," the Holy Father continued.

The Name of God is Mercy, published Jan. 12, takes an in-depth look at Pope Francis' vision of mercy and forgiveness, with nine chapters of candid questions-and-answers between Pope Francis and Tornielli.

Among other topics, the mercy-themed book further explains Pope Francis' words "who am I to judge" and explores his thoughts on confession, his hopes for the Jubilee Year of Mercy, and how to be open to God's mercy.

Tornielli compiled the book-length interview out of curiosity, wanting to know more about Pope Francis' personal take on mercy and forgiveness. Through various stories told throughout the interview, such as the encounter with the prostitute, Pope Francis revealed that the most important thing for every man and woman is not that they should never fall – but rather that they should always get back up.

"For as long as we are alive it is always possible to start over, all we have to do is let Jesus embrace us and forgive us," the Holy Father stated in the book.

"There is medicine, there is healing, we only need to take a small step toward God, or at least express the desire to take it," he continued, saying "a tiny opening is enough."

10:00

Reply to Mgr Pope: Are Traditional Catholics doing enough? [RORATE CÆLI]

IMG_8598
Evangelising in difficult conditions (the rain): the LMS Walsingham Pilgrimage
Mgr Charles Pope has written a blog post about how those who love the Traditional Mass should make greater efforts to evangelise for it. He says this because he thinks, on the basis of anecdotal evidence, that attendance at the EF has stopped growing. He links this with the very lethargic attitude he once noticed, of Novus Ordo Catholics faced with the prospect of losing their parochial school. I confess I don't understand the parallel.


These Novus Ordo Catholics of a couple of decades ago, mostly older people (people, he says, with grown-up children and grandchildren), whom the young Fr Pope talked to about their school, were members of the first, or the beginnings of the second, generation of Catholics who failed to reproduce and failed to pass on the faith. They had typically been brought up in significantly larger families, been given systematic catechesis in the old style, and had been introduced to Catholic traditions of all kinds: grace before meals, daily prayers, dressing up for Sunday Mass, an expectation that Catholic boys and girls should marry other Catholics, and the Traditional Mass. Nearly all of them chucked it in, everything except going to Mass on Sundays. 'What I have received, I have not passed on': that was the motto of that generation. Sometimes with regret, sometimes with relief, sometimes with the fierce joy of the vandal. But by the end of their lives, there was very little left. Their children had mostly lapsed. About half of them had lapsed themselves. The young ones still turning up at church were sometimes clueless about the Faith. Catholics today don't even necessarily know that the Church teaches the Real Presence.

Mgr Pope thinks that the Traditional Catholics of today are like them?

Traditional Catholics, who have rediscovered the Faith and the liturgy and the traditions of the Church. Traditional Catholics, who have started saying grace at meals again, who have larger families, who make an effort at least not to attend Sunday Mass in beachwear, who catechise, and sometimes home-educate, their children: Traditional Catholics, who not only do these things, but are attacked for doing them. Mgr Pope, please explain, how does your experience from all those years ago with Novus Ordo Catholics give you an insight into the attitudes of Traditional Catholics today? Any why do you assume that ordinary Catholics in the pews at the Traditional Mass are not doing their bit to evangelise?

Is Mgr Pope talking about preaching on street corners? Or does he have in mind, in line with the normal expectations of Catholics down the ages, giving witness by a life of Faith? That would include a family life connected with the liturgical year, which observes feasts and days of abstinence; a home with religious images; a personal life in accordance with the teaching of the Church on sexuality and marriage; a refusal to go along with the demands of the new, pagan thought-police on issues like gender theory. A willingness, with appropriate caution, to give gentle witness to the apparently sincere enquirer at work or elsewhere, when such witness can cost you your job, or even a criminal conviction.

Perhaps he means that Catholics should have a role in the Pro-Life movement. That they should take part in public witnesses to the Faith such as Eucharistic processions and visible walking pilgrimages. That they should assist in the re-edification of historic churches in city centres, which can incarnate the Faith and draw in the curious passer-by.

Perhaps he thinks that Catholics should try to influence ecclesiastical policy, and encourage their bishops not to hide the faith, but rather give stronger witness to it. That they should support the priests who stand up to those who want to offend God and give scandal to the Faithful during the liturgy itself, by liturgical abuses or sacrilegious communions.

But if that is what Mgr Pope has in mind, it should be obvious that it is Traditional Catholics who are doing these things, and if he is right that we constitute only 2% of the Catholic population, then the contribution of the other 98% is woeful indeed. For I know very well, from my own anecdotal experience, that if I attend a pro-life event, I will recognise a large proportion of the participants from my work for the Traditional Mass. That if you found 100 representative Catholic families with more than 4 children, a lot more than 2 of of them would attend the Traditional Mass. That if you start an on-line petition for a Catholic cause, it can quickly become a roll-call of Traditional Catholics. That if a bishops wants to save a historic city-centre church from closure, he is likely to turn to the Traditional priestly institutes. That if you ask a roomful of children of Traditional Catholic families about the Faith, they will at least have some idea of what the Holy Trinity is.

Perhaps we could do more. I resist the idea, however, that the way forward for the Traditional movement is to attack its members for being lazy. I am sorry, Mgr, I think this is grossly unjust. Traditional Catholics routinely make sacrifices for the Faith, for the liturgy, for the salvation of their children, and for their priests, which other Catholics would simply not consider.

Why, then, is not attendance at the Traditional Mass growing? It is growing. Contrary to Mgr Pope's anecdotal observations, the number of Masses, which are easier to count than people, continues to grow, and the limits on growth are the limits on the number of priests able and willing to say the Masses. Masses in new locations gain congregations of people with no previous affiliation to the Traditional movement: this is what we mean by the Mass itself evangelising. People are converted by the Traditional Mass. People change their lives. And most visibly, it fosters vocations to the priesthood and the religious life.

It is unjust to lambast the Faithful for laziness in spreading the Traditional Mass, when priests who celebrate it are still treated, too often, as eccentrics, or even pariahs, by their dioceses. When lay people who attend it become persona non grata in many Catholic institutions. When attempts to restore the battered fabric of historic churches are still thwarted by ideologically-driven diocesan committees. I am sorry, Mgr Pope, bishops have a lot to do to channel the energy of the Traditional faithful into evangelisation: too much of this energy is still used up in overcoming obstacles within the Church.

Mgr Pope is right that the Traditional Mass is not an immediate hit with everyone who experiences it for the first time. Nor is the Novus Ordo. The Traditional Mass has a particular problem, however. Fruitful participation requires, at a deep level, an understanding and acceptance of the fact that God is transcendent and supremely worthy of worship; that Jesus Christ is Divine, and comes down upon the Altar at the Consecration; that there is such a thing as sin, and that sin makes you less worthy of receiving Holy Communion; that there are saints, who intercede for us. Yes, that is a problem, because emotionally, and frequently intellectually, many nominal, and even church-going Catholics, no longer believe these things. It is tough going to bring them to the Traditional Mass, because it is tough going bringing them back to the Faith.

The blame for that belongs to a lot of people over many years. But don't blame Traditional Catholics.

Reply to Mgr Pope: Lazy Traditional Catholics? [LMS Chairman]


IMG_8598
Evangelising in difficult conditions (the rain): the LMS Walsingham Pilgrimage
Mgr Charles Pope has written a blog post about how those who love the Traditional Mass should make greater efforts to evangelise for it. He says this because he thinks, on the basis of anecdotal evidence, that attendance at the EF has stopped growing. He links this with the very lethargic attitude he once noticed, of Novus Ordo Catholics faced with the prospect of losing their parochial school. I confess I don't understand the parallel.

These Novus Ordo Catholics of a couple of decades ago, mostly older people (people, he says, with grown-up children and grandchildren), whom the young Fr Pope talked to about their school, were members of the first, or the beginnings of the second, generation of Catholics who failed to reproduce and failed to pass on the faith. They had typically been brought up in significantly larger families, been given systematic catechesis in the old style, and had been introduced to Catholic traditions of all kinds: grace before meals, daily prayers, dressing up for Sunday Mass, an expectation that Catholic boys and girls should marry other Catholics, and the Traditional Mass. Nearly all of them chucked it in, everything except going to Mass on Sundays. 'What I have received, I have not passed on': that was the motto of that generation. Sometimes with regret, sometimes with relief, sometimes with the fierce joy of the vandal. But by the end of their lives, there was very little left. Their children had mostly lapsed. About half of them had lapsed themselves. The young ones still turning up at church were sometimes clueless about the Faith. Catholics today don't even necessarily know that the Church teaches the Real Presence.

Mgr Pope thinks that the Traditional Catholics of today are like them?
Traditional Catholics, who have rediscovered the Faith and the liturgy and the traditions of the Church. Traditional Catholics, who have started saying grace at meals again, who have larger families, who make an effort at least not to attend Sunday Mass in beachwear, who catechise, and sometimes home-educate, their children: Traditional Catholics, who not only do these things, but are attacked for doing them. Mgr Pope, please explain, how does your experience from all those years ago with Novus Ordo Catholics give you an insight into the attitudes of Traditional Catholics today? Any why do you assume that ordinary Catholics in the pews at the Traditional Mass are not doing their bit to evangelise?

Is Mgr Pope talking about preaching on street corners? Or does he have in mind, in line with the normal expectations of Catholics down the ages, giving witness by a life of Faith? That would include a family life connected with the liturgical year, which observes feasts and days of abstinence; a home with religious images; a personal life in accordance with the teaching of the Church on sexuality and marriage; a refusal to go along with the demands of the new, pagan thought-police on issues like gender theory. A willingness, with appropriate caution, to give gentle witness to the apparently sincere enquirer at work or elsewhere, when such witness can cost you your job, or even a criminal conviction.

Perhaps he means that Catholics should have a role in the Pro-Life movement. That they should take part in public witnesses to the Faith such as Eucharistic processions and visible walking pilgrimages. That they should assist in the re-edification of historic churches in city centres, which can incarnate the Faith and draw in the curious passer-by.

Perhaps he thinks that Catholics should try to influence ecclesiastical policy, and encourage their bishops not to hide the faith, but rather give stronger witness to it. That they should support the priests who stand up to those who want to offend God and give scandal to the Faithful during the liturgy itself, by liturgical abuses or sacrilegious communions.

But if that is what Mgr Pope has in mind, it should be obvious that it is Traditional Catholics who are doing these things, and if he is right that we constitute only 2% of the Catholic population, then the contribution of the other 98% is woeful indeed. For I know very well, from my own anecdotal experience, that if I attend a pro-life event, I will recognise a large proportion of the participants from my work for the Traditional Mass. That if you found 100 representative Catholic families with more than 4 children, a lot more than 2 of of them would attend the Traditional Mass. That if you start an on-line petition for a Catholic cause, it can quickly become a roll-call of Traditional Catholics. That if a bishops wants to save a historic city-centre church from closure, he is likely to turn to the Traditional priestly institutes. That if you ask a roomful of children of Traditional Catholic families about the Faith, they will at least have some idea of what the Holy Trinity is.

Perhaps we could do more. I resist the idea, however, that the way forward for the Traditional movement is to attack its members for being lazy. I am sorry, Mgr, I think this is grossly unjust. Traditional Catholics routinely make sacrifices for the Faith, for the liturgy, for the salvation of their children, and for their priests, which other Catholics would simply not consider.

Why, then, is not attendance at the Traditional Mass growing? It is growing. Contrary to Mgr Pope's anecdotal observations, the number of Masses, which are easier to count than people, continues to grow, and the limits on growth are the limits on the number of priests able and willing to say the Masses. Masses in new locations gain congregations of people with no previous affiliation to the Traditional movement: this is what we mean by the Mass itself evangelising. People are converted by the Traditional Mass. People change their lives. And most visibly, it fosters vocations to the priesthood and the religious life.

It is unjust to lambast the Faithful for laziness in spreading the Traditional Mass, when priests who celebrate it are still treated, too often, as eccentrics, or even pariahs, by their dioceses. When lay people who attend it become persona non grata in many Catholic institutions. When attempts to restore the battered fabric of historic churches are still thwarted by ideologically-driven diocesan committees. I am sorry, Mgr Pope, bishops have a lot to do to channel the energy of the Traditional faithful into evangelisation: too much of this energy is still used up in overcoming obstacles within the Church.

Mgr Pope is right that the Traditional Mass is not an immediate hit with everyone who experiences it for the first time. Nor is the Novus Ordo. The Traditional Mass has a particular problem, however. Fruitful participation requires, at a deep level, an understanding and acceptance of the fact that God is transcendent and supremely worthy of worship; that Jesus Christ is Divine, and comes down upon the Altar at the Consecration; that there is such a thing as sin, and that sin makes you less worthy of receiving Holy Communion; that there are saints, who intercede for us. Yes, that is a problem, because emotionally, and frequently intellectually, many nominal, and even church-going Catholics, no longer believe these things. It is tough going to bring them to the Traditional Mass, because it is tough going bringing them back to the Faith.

The blame for that belongs to a lot of people over many years. But don't blame Traditional Catholics.

Support the work of the LMS by becoming an 'Anniversary Supporter'.

09:27

Private Tragedy, Public Grief: David Bowie [iBenedictines]

The death of David Bowie was, I imagine, a tragedy for his family and friends: a deeply-felt personal loss compounded of many different elements. For David Bowie himself, I don’t think ‘tragedy’ is the right word. What happens after death (…)

Read the rest of this entry »

08:43

Hey Longenecker, Armstrong and the rest of you Rad, Mad, Neo-Caths behaving badly, what are you doing hanging out with pagans and voodoo advocates? [Vox Cantoris]

Truly Father Longenecker, and my good friend, the verbose and oh-so-tolerant-of-his-fellow-Catholics, Dave Armstrong; how could you think that associating with an organisation that also promotes pagans and voodoo could possibly be a wise thing?

Sorry, no links from here to "Pathetic dot com," which is also the only word necessary to describe any Catholic writer who would associate with such a group.


Shame on all of you.

07:00

We have seen the true light [Vultus Christi]

The Epiphany Mystery–Events
The mystery of the Epiphany or, if you will, of the Theophany — that is, of the appearing of God in the midst of men — continues to unfold before the eyes of our souls and to resound in the ears of the our hearts. Each of the mysteries of the Epiphany, beginning with the adoration of the Magi, and continuing in the liturgy with the Gospels of the baptism of the Lord (John 1:29–34), of the wedding feast at Cana (John 2:1–11), of the cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8: 1–5), and of the calming of the great tempest (Matthew 8:23–27), puts us in real contact with the adorable divinity of Jesus Christ, revealed in human flesh, and operating through that sacred flesh to give light to those in darkness, to lift up the fallen, to heal the sick, to reconcile men to God, and to open the kingdom of heaven to us while we are yet on earth. Each of these mysteries of the Epiphany operates in a manner proper to the event it makes present.

Today’s Grace
How, then, are we to lay hold of the grace proper to today’s feast of the Baptism of the Lord? While the chants of the Mass and the lesson are those of January 6th — so that we not lose the thread that ties today’s feast to the illumination of the nations and the adoration of the Magi — the Collect, Gospel, Secret, and Postcommunion are proper to the Baptism of the Lord. This means that if we are to look anywhere for the special grace of today’s feast, it is in these elements of Holy Mass.

If one wants to know what God is offering one on any given day, one must open one’s missal and there, in the prayers of the Mass, discover those things for which the Church is asking. One may want other things. One may have other ideas. One may think one needs certain graces. The Church, however, in the sacred liturgy always asks for exactly the things one needs. To receive these things one must practice a certain abnegation. One must say to one’s soul:

My soul, thou hast thy desires; leave them all aside and enter into the desires of God. Thou hast thy plans and thy dreams; let go of them and lay hold of the plan of God so as to fulfil His dreams for thee. Thou hast thy preoccuptions, thy worries, thy anxieties, and thy needs; seek to discover what God would give thee, and ask for that thing. If thou askest for what God already desireth to give thee, thou art asking rightly and will be heard promptly, for God is quick to grant the things for which He Himself moveth us to ask.

Inwardly Reformed
The Collect makes us ask that “we may be inwardly reformed by Him, whom we recognise to have been outwardly like unto ourselves”.

O God, Whose only-begotten Son appeared in the substance of our flesh, grant, we beseech Thee, that we may be inwardly reformed by Him, whom we recognise to have been outwardly like ourselves. (Collect of the Mass)

This is not a grace for which we would, of ourselves, dare ask. It is a risky thing to say to God. “reform me inwardly” because most of us, I think, are resistent to reform. We do not like change, especially when that change touches us personally. I am reminded of what Satan said to God in the first chapter of the book of Job: “Stretch forth thy hand a little, and touch all that he hath, and see if he blesseth thee not to thy face” (Job 1:11). We Benedictines are in a most peculiar bind. We have made profession of conversatio morum. This means that we have given God full and unlimited permission to change us as He sees fit, and this over a whole lifetime. One doesn’t enter a monastery to be safe, and comfortable, and cosy. One enters to take the great risk, saying to God: “Change Thou me, as Thou wilt, when Thou wilt, and in the way Thou wilt, and to Thy divine reforming action, I shall add my little Amen of adoration and submission”. Thus does Mother Mectilde write in The True Spirit:

If they cannot possess themselves in peace, reverence and attention, let them from their very heart repeat over and over again in union with the church, Amen. This word is full of mystery, it is the soul’s acknowledgement of, and consent to what God does in his Church and to what the Church does for God.

Sons in the Son
The Gospel is a great unveiling of the Most Holy Trinity. The Baptism of the Lord is the first of a series of festivals of the Most Holy Trinity. The second Trinitarian festival is the Transfiguration of the Lord on the Second Sunday of Lent and again on August 6th. The third Trinitarian festival is on the Octave Day of Pentecost, when the whole work of Redemption is summed up and turned into doxology, that is, praise of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Pray to Saint John the Baptist today; it is Saint John, the friend of the Bridegroom, who bears witness to the Most Holy Trinity:

I saw the Spirit coming down, as a dove from heaven, and he remained upon him. And I knew him not; but he who sent me to baptize with water, said to me: He upon whom thou shalt see the Spirit descending, and remaining upon him, he it is that baptizeth with the Holy Ghost. And I saw, and I gave testimony, that this is the Son of God. (John 1:32–34)

The Gospel shows us the effect of the reform that God would operate in us: the Father, by giving us the Holy Ghost, makes us sons in the son.

For whosoever are led by the Spirit of God, they are the sons of God. For you have not received the spirit of bondage again in fear; but you have received the spirit of adoption of sons, whereby we cry: Abba Father. (Romans 8:14–15)

And because you are sons, God hath sent the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying: Abba, Father. (Galatians 4:6)

Very few Catholics grasp the reality of their divine sonship by adoption. For too many, the great baptismal grace that is divine adoption remains something notional. something vague and, as it were, something obscure in the back of one’s mind. This is why, in every age, God raises up saints, and doctors, and mystics to call us back to what makes Christianity different from every other religion, philosophy, ethical system, and mystical meandering on the planet: divine sonship by adoption. We are, by grace, what Jesus is by nature. All the Fathers taught this. The Doctors scrutinised it and marveled at the divine condescension. Mother Mectilde seized upon this in the 17th century and wrote about it in her letters. Saint Thérèse, Blessed Abbot Marmion, Blessed Elisabeth of the Trinity, and the Venerable Itala Mela, all of these were raised up in modern times to say to souls: You are not mere seekers after wisdom, you are not slaves in submission to a remote divinity, you are not keepers of a moral order; you are sons in the Son. This is so stupendous a mystery that many put it aside and prefer to concentrate on things less unsettling.

We bring Thee offerings, O Lord, for the appearing of Thy new born Son, humbly beseeching Thee that, as He is the author of our gifts, so also He may mercifully receive them. (Secret of the Mass)

The Priestly Offering
The Secret tells that we are not only sons in Christ the Son, but also priests in Christ the Priest. The essential action of a priest is to make offerings, to be a sacrificer.  The priest alone stands at the altar in the person of Christ the Head but behind him stand the whole priestly people joining with him in one single offering. The Secret calls Our Lord Jesus Christ “the author of our gifts”. We need to dwell on this phrase for a moment: we come to Holy Mass not only to receive, but also to offer. And what have we to offer except what we have received? Saint Paul says, “What hast thou that thou hast not received? And if thou hast received, why dost thou glory, as if thou hadst not received it?” (1 Corinthians 4:7). This is the great movement of the Mass: we offer what we have received, and then receive what we have offered. Saint John of the Cross makes us aware of all that we have received:

Mine are the heavens and mine is the earth.  Mine are the nations, the just are mine, and mine the sinners.  The angels are mine, and the Mother of God, and all things are mine; and God Himself is mine and for me, because Christ is mine and all for me. What do you ask, then, and seek, my soul?  Yours is all of this, and all is for you. (Prayer of a Soul Taken With Love)

With Clear Sight
The Postcommunion is a prayer not only for today but every day on which we find ourselves surrounded by obscurity and walking in uncertainty. It puts one in mind of Blessed John Henry Newman’s Lead, Kindly Light:

We pray Thee, O Lord, to go before us at all times and in all places with Thy heavenly light, that we may discern with clear sight and receive with the right disposition the mystery of which Thou hast willed that we should partake. (Postcommunion of the Mass)

The True Light
Today, without excluding the heavenly light of the star that guided the Magi, the liturgy would have us gaze upon the heavenly light shining upon the Face of Christ as He emerges from the waters of the Jordan. It is the same light that radiates invisibly from the Face of Christ hidden in the Sacred Host. This is the light that causes the Church to sing:

We have seen the true light; we have received the heavenly Spirit; we have found the true faith, worshiping the undivided Trinity, for the Trinity has saved us. (Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom)

 

 

07:00

Change of Heart in Confucius [RSS]

After speaking of the duties between sovereign and minister, father and son, husband and wife, elder brother and younger, and friend and friend, Confucius writes gracefully, “Some are born with the knowledge of those duties; some know them by study; and some acquire the knowledge after a painful feeling of their ignorance.”

By those who come to know these duties “after a painful feeling of their ignorance,” I would like to think he means those who experience repentance and change of heart.  Even such a slight and passing allusion to such things is rare outside of revelation.  One is refreshed, as by a breeze from heaven.

On the other hand, the sage goes on to say, “Some practice them with a natural ease; some from a desire for their advantages; and some by strenuous effort.  But the achievement being made, it comes to the same thing.”  These words contain not even a trace of awareness of divine grace – especially of the transformative importance of the motive divine of charity.  To pursue virtue from a desire for its advantages seems to miss the point.

Source:  Confucius, The Doctrine of the Mean

 

06:00

Priestly celibacy: More than a mere discipline [RORATE CÆLI]


Yesterday, we reported that priestly celibacy was once again on Pope Francis' radar (see here). We at Rorate have seen this coming for a while as an organic -- yet oh-so-non-organic -- development in the future erosion of the Church's tradition.

Seeing this coming, when we interviewed Raymond Cardinal Burke last year, we asked him about a pending attack on priestly celibacy. His Eminence confirmed that "it's something more than a discipline" and, therefore, would be very difficult to change (see here). 

If we've learned anything, though, it's that everything is on the menu in this Pontificate. 

The link below will take you to a sermon by a traditional mission priest in in good standing with Rome. Even those of you that think you know this issue inside and out will benefit by listening to Father's detailed history of priestly celibacy and why following the East is simply not a viable option for a Church already facing irrelevance and self-destruction. 

05:12

Being Ordered by Time [Ethika Politika]

duggan

A few weeks ago, as I trudged to campus at 5:45 a.m. for my early morning study group, (college students meet at even these hours when exams are on the horizon), a friend and fellow member of the study group offered to give me a ride to campus. As I hopped into his car, I caught sight of a brightly colored rectangular box. When I asked him why he was driving around my neighborhood at this hour, he replied, “It’s the Immaculate Conception, and we’re celebrating with Dunkin’ Donuts!” Even with the fog of early morning still clouding my mind, I smiled at my friend’s festive spirit. At the same time, it struck me that I had no idea how to commemorate a feast day if it wasn’t Christmas or Easter. I knew that a wide variety of feast days were observed sumptuously in the past, but I was at a loss for the Immaculate Conception. There was also my friend’s simple awareness that this was a day to celebrate: I had rarely thought that a particular day should alone cause me to pause and reflect, let alone go out and buy a box of sprinkled doughnuts (one of which I recall was blue, fittingly enough). I am a workaholic: days are stretches of time that I fill as I like. My friend’s attitude towards time challenged this. This past Christmas break, I observed my seasonal tradition of reading Truman Capote’s A Christmas Memory, the story of the author’s childhood Christmas traditions with his aunt Sook Faulk. One of the great lines is Sook Faulk—feeling the chill in the November air and seeing her breath fog the windows—announcing “‘It’s fruitcake weather!’” “Fruitcake weather” sends Sook and Capote, or “Buddy,” as she calls him, into a flurry of baking, mailing cakes to friends far and wide, finding the perfect Christmas tree in a faraway wood, and crafting gifts for one another. Sook has a keen awareness of her present moment. The time of year itself moves her and her nephew to observe traditions that celebrate the particular season they are experiencing.   Letting Time Order Me When it comes to organizing my time, I have two options: I can order time for myself or I can let time order me. I can force myself to use the time that I have to its “best use,” or I can let the time I am given move me. What I have come to like about the latter way of doing things—especially by honoring a Sunday or a feast day—is that it reminds me that the day has a value beyond what I accomplish in it. I have cultivated this sensibility towards time only after living for a long period with a very different one: I would spend hours working until I was weary because I thought it would make me happy to be as productive as possible. Yet I only felt anxious and unaccomplished.  From now on, instead of just asking myself whether I have done all that I wanted to do in a given day, I also want to ask myself whether I have attended to “what” or “who” has needed my attention that day, and whether I have focused on the present moment. One challenge to a better ethic of time is the ability to take our work with us wherever we go. As a student, this takes a toll.  It also robs time of some of its originality.  We can blur the distinction between morning, noon, and night because all three can all be filled with work or entertainment of any kind we choose. Even the phrase, “spending time,” reveals who, between our time and ourselves, is the boss. While it is not bad to be driven, I find it very easy to pursue one goal single-mindedly and drive out considerations of other things, including the call to celebrate or rest on Sundays and feast days. Sometimes my doggedness to finish a task can even lead to ridiculous uses of time: picture a frantic student trying to read the Nicomachean Ethics while waiting in line at a noisy and packed airport, desperately hoping to re-book a cancelled flight. That was me last Christmas. Honoring Time Growing up, I used to hear the phrase “live the present moment” fairly often. After a while, the words lost their meaning for me. It was only in my first year of college when I realized, to my horror, that I had developed a habit of planning every fifteen-minute block of my day (I gave myself twenty minutes for lunch), that it occurred to me I had gone too far with my love of productivity. Time was putty in my hands, and I had deprived the present of its spark. I still struggle to order my time rightly. Sundays and holy days pull me out of my own frenetic stream of plans, and my own drive to produce, and remind me to pay homage to something far more worthy of praise—and a box of Dunkin Donuts—than the glossy pink planner on my desk.

The post Being Ordered by Time appeared first on Ethika Politika.

05:00

A Hidden Soul [Tea at Trianon]

From Vultus Christi:

Sixty–three years ago, in the heart of Rome, died one of those hidden souls whose entire life is but a silent offering. The holiness of such souls is brought to light when, providentially, one discovers that their action, although discreet, is wonderfully fruitful in the mystery of Mother Church. Maria Sieler, who died in Rome in 1952, was one such soul. Austrian by origin, she settled in the Eternal City in 1939 to pursue and consummate a life yielded entirely to Christ, and to plant there the seed of the work that Heaven had asked of her.

Born on February 3, 1899 in Winterdorf in central Styria, she was baptized the following day. Her parents were modest but very devout farmers. They had five children; Maria was the second of these. At six years of age she lost her father. His death reduced the family to poverty. At a very young age, Maria was obliged to begin work on the family farm and to care for her three younger sisters. Her childhood was divided among the school, the farm where she worked as a shepherdess, and her visits to the church. Very early on, she received two mystical graces, which were to orient her entire existence. (Read more.)

04:48

Dragged kicking and screaming [Oz Conservative]

Still observing the reaction of feminists to events in Cologne. Laurie Penny, a radical English feminist, to her credit did at least try to formulate a response. She wrote a column in the New Statesman which even made a small concession. After nine paragraphs of attacks on the right, she did finally admit that there do exist non-white men who attack women (I can imagine her having written that with clenched teeth). As if to try to restore her soul, she then went back in the next paragraph to blaming a "white supremacist patriarchy" for attacks on women.

So reality did force a small shift in perspective for Laurie Penny. But the next day she was still making comments like this one:

Laurie Penny ‏@PennyRed . @voxday et al: 'we have to stop those Muslims harassing Western women! That's OUR job!'

Such a strange outlook. She really has absorbed the idea that men in general, and white men in particular, are organised around the task of oppressing women. It must be terrible to live by this creed. What would you think of your own brothers or your father or your son? You couldn't experience the joy we are supposed to have in the experience of the opposite sex, as you would always be thinking of men as your enemy or oppressor.

Laurie Penny is also missing out on the solidarity that is meant to exist between the men and women of a community. In a healthy society, men will think positively in terms of "our" women, and women will do the same in terms of men. There will be small daily courtesies enacted between the sexes to express this positive regard. Men will naturally be protective of the women of their own community.

We have become scattered as individuals - drawn apart - by the kinds of views held by Laurie Penny.

If you look at Laurie Penny's twitter conversation, there are some good responses:
Milo Yiannopoulos ‏@voxday · Jan 11 .@PennyRed They are our mothers, sisters, wives, daughters, and friends. Who else is going to protect them? Obviously not the police.

Punished Nuttall ‏@PunishedNut · Jan 11 .@PennyRed @voxday Feminists look the other way when it's inconveniently immigrants/muslims raping women, but will happily attack white men

Common Man ‏@hydar · Jan 11 So many "feminists" blame anyone but rapists for rape. @PennyRed @voxday

scagbert ‏@hugowhite1 · Jan 11 @PennyRed @voxday Laurie Penny finds oppression where there isn't any, and ignores or makes excuses for blatant acts of oppression

01:39

What We Can Learn About Suffering in the Story of Joseph the Patriarch [Community in Mission]

blog.1.12.16 2One of the greatest (but most painful) of mysteries is that of suffering and evil in the world. I was meditating with my Sunday school parents this past weekend on the Old Testament patriarch Joseph. His story is rich with lessons about family struggles, envy, jealousy, pride, mercy, and forgiveness. But it also has a lot to say about suffering and the way that God can use it to bring blessings.

While there are many layers to Joseph’s story, both personal and communal, it is clear that God often allows great injustice and suffering only to produce great glory and healing on account of it. Let’s weave the story together with some basic teachings about suffering.

A. Structures of sin bring suffering – The story of Joseph begins with a dysfunctional household. Joseph’s father, Jacob, had two wives (Leah and Rachel) and twelve sons with his wives and their maids (Zilpah and Bilhah). Polygamy and adultery are not part of God’s plan! To be outside of God’s will is always to ask for trouble. Having sons by four different women produces no end of internecine conflicts. Sure enough, Jacob’s sons all vie for power and have divided loyalties because they have different mothers.

And in this matter we see that much suffering is ushered in by human sinfulness. When we are outside of God’s will we invite trouble. Sadly, the trouble affects not only the sinners, but many others as well.

Thus the sons of Jacob have been born into a mess, and into what moralists describe as the “structures of sin.” In these broken situations of structural sin, sin and suffering multiply.

And it is often the children who suffer. Having inherited a mess, the children begin to act badly and disdainfully. Suffering and evil grow rapidly in these settings.

In the world today, it is probably not an exaggeration to say that 80% of our suffering would go away if we all just kept the commandments. But, sadly, we do not repent, either individually or collectively.

And thus the first answer to why there is suffering is sin. Original Sin ended paradise. Individual sin brings dysfunction and a host of social ills. And while this does not explain all suffering (e.g., natural disasters) it does explain a lot of it.

Joseph is about to suffer on account of a structurally sinful situation brought about by Jacob, his wives, and his mistresses, and contributed to by all the members of the household. It’s not his fault but he will suffer.

B. Suffering can bring purification and humility – Though Joseph’s brothers all fought among themselves, they did agree on one thing: Jacob’s youngest son, Joseph, just had to go. Jacob’s favorite wife was Rachel, and when she finally bore a son (Joseph) he became Jacob’s favorite. Jacob doted on him, praised him, and even gave him a beautiful coat that inflamed his brothers with jealousy. They were also enraged and envious because Joseph had many gifts: he was a natural leader; he was able to interpret dreams. Joseph had the kind of self-esteem that perhaps celebrated his gifts too boldly. Among the dreams that he had (and related) was that he would one day rule over his brothers. This was altogether too much for them. Even Jacob had to rebuke Joseph for speaking in this manner.

Here we see a possible flaw or character defect in Joseph. It is hard to know if Joseph actually crossed the line. After all, his dreams were true. He was a gifted young man and would one day rule over his brothers. Someone once said, “It’s not boasting if it’s true.”

And while this has some validity, it is possible for us to conclude that Joseph was awfully self-assured and may have lacked humility, something that required purification.

Surely, as a young man he had a lot to learn. Suffering has a way of both purifying us and granting us humility and wisdom. If Joseph was going to be a great leader, he, like Moses before him, needed some time in the desert of suffering. And thus we sense that God permitted trials for him in order to prepare him for wise, effective, and compassionate leadership.

And so, too, for us. Trials and sufferings prepare us for greater things and purify us of pride and self-reliance. Woe to the man who has not suffered, who is unbroken. God permits us trials and difficulties in order to help us hone our skills, know our limits, grow in wisdom, and develop compassion and trust.

C. Suffering opens doors – On account of all of this, Joseph’s brothers plot to kill him. But, figuring that they can make some money, they instead sell him to the Ishmaelites as a slave. Joseph ends up in Egypt, in the house of the wealthy Potiphar. His natural leadership skills earn him quick promotions and he soon comes to manage Potiphar’s extensive household.

It is true that Joseph had a disaster befall him: he was sold into slavery. It is hard to imagine a worse fate. Yet strangely God permitted that in order to open a door. When Joseph was being carted off to Egypt in chains, it would have been hard to convince him that his life was anything but a disaster. Yet God was up to something good.

Within months Joseph is in a good spot, working for a wealthy man as a trusted adviser and manager. As we shall see, more still will be required in order for Joseph to be prepared for his ultimate work.

But at this point in the story, the lesson is clear enough: God permits some sufferings in order to get us to move to the next stage. He closes one door but opens another. There is pain in the closing of the door to the familiar, but there is greater joy beyond in the door He opens.

How about for you? What doors has God closed in your life, only to open something better? At the time a door closes we may suffer and wonder if God cares. But later we see what God was doing, for the new door opens to things far greater.

D. Suffering helps summon courage – In a tragic way, sorrow comes again to Joseph. Potiphar’s wife takes a liking to Joseph and tries to seduce him. Joseph refuses her advances out of fear of God and respect for Potiphar. But in her scorn she falsely accuses Joseph of having made advances on her and Joseph is thrown in jail! More misery, more suffering, on account of the sins of others, not his own! Joseph was suffering for doing the right thing!

One of the great virtues that we must all develop is that of courage. In a world steeped in sin it takes great courage to resist the tide.

But courage, like any virtue cannot simply be developed in the abstract. Rather, it must be developed. It must quite often be refined in the crucible of opposition and persecution.

And thus we see how God helps Joseph to develop his courage and trust by permitting this trial. Many centuries later, Jesus would say, In this world you shall have tribulation, but have confidence, I have overcome the world (Jn 16:33). He also said, Blessed are those who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for the kingdom of heaven is theirs (Matt 5:10).

As for Joseph, so also for us. If we are going to make it through this sinful world with our soul intact, we are going to need a lot of courage. The Lord often develops courage via the crucible, asking us to trust Him that we will be vindicated, whether in this world or the next.

E. Suffering builds trust – While in prison, Joseph meets two other prisoners from Pharaoh’s household: the cup-bearer, and the baker. In prison, they witness Joseph’s ability to interpret dreams and observe his natural leadership skills. In accordance with a prophecy given by Joseph, the cup-bearer is restored to Pharaoh’s service. He reports Joseph’s dream-interpretation skills to Pharaoh, who is having troubling dreams.

God humbles us only to exalt us. As Joseph has learned, God can make a way out of no way. He can do anything but fail, and He writes straight with crooked lines.

In jail Joseph, has his trust in God confirmed. Through his connections in jail, of all places, he will rise to become the prime minister of all Egypt. Having come through the crucible, Joseph is now ready for the main work that God has in store for him.

Consider how God’s providence has prepared you for something that you wouldn’t have been able to handle at an earlier stage in your life. Surely he prepared you in many ways, but among them was through humility and suffering. Setbacks or failures have a way of teaching us and preparing us for some of the greatest things that we enjoy. In our struggles we learn the essential truth. We come to trust and depend on God, who knows what we need, what is best for us, and how to prepare us for the work He expects from us.

F. Suffering produces wisdom – Joseph is brought to Pharaoh, and not only does he powerfully interpret Pharaoh’s dreams, but also presents a 14-year plan that will lead them through a looming crisis. Pharaoh is impressed and appoints Joseph as the equivalent of prime minister of all Egypt.

Joseph is able to interpret Pharaoh’s dream. But he doesn’t simply interpret what it means, he also sets forth a wise plan. He explains to Pharaoh that the next 14 years will have their ups and downs. And where might Joseph have learned this truth? In the crucible of his own life, of course.

There is great wisdom in grasping that what is seen and experienced in this world is transitory. We do well to listen to the Lord’s wisdom, which is eternal.

Centuries later, the Lord related a parable of a wealthy man who had a great harvest and thought he was set forever. Lord called him a fool for thinking this way. Our abundance is not meant to be hoarded for ourselves. Excess food is not to be stored away for ourselves, but rather “stored” in the stomachs of the hungry.

And thus Joseph has been prepared for this moment by God. Joseph is no fool; he has learned God’s wisdom and direction. Whatever abundance occurs in the next seven years must be set aside for those who will be hungry in the years that follow.

Joseph’s wisdom is no accident, no mere hunch; it has come from the crucible of suffering. Suffering does that. It helps us to become wise, to get our priorities straight. In this case it helps us to understand that our wealth depends on the “commonwealth.” We cannot live merely for ourselves; that is foolishness. We are called to live for others.

What wisdom has God taught you through suffering? How has suffering helped you to get your priorities straight? How has it helped you to see the passing quality of life in this world and to set your sights on the world to come and on the judgment that awaits you? On the Day of Judgment will God call you foolish or wise? If you are wise, how did you get there?

G. In our suffering, we learn that our lives are not about us – Joseph predicted seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine. Under Joseph’s direction, grain was stored in abundance during the years of plenty. So plentiful were the harvests during those years that the stored grain saved Egypt and many neighboring lands saved from famine. In a plot twist, Joseph’s brothers come to Egypt seeking food during those lean years. His anxious brothers recognize him and fear for their lives. Joseph reassures them by remarking that though their actions were intended for evil, God intended them for good. Joseph saves the very brothers who wanted to kill him.

In our suffering, we learn that our lives are not about us. Joseph was not purified and prepared for this moment simply for his own sake, but for the sake of others as well (or maybe even more). God has led Joseph, often through terrible suffering, in order to prepare him to help save others.

God did not simply prepare him to be a big cheese. God did not prepare him for glorious leadership for his own sake, but for the sake of others.

One of the lessons that we learn in Joseph’s story is that our life is interconnected with that of many other members of the Body of Christ, all of whom are precious and important to God.

God had to put Joseph through a lot in order to prepare him for his role of helping others. We are not called to live only for our own self. God loves us individually, but he also loves others through us. And he loves them enough that sometimes he is willing to make us wait for their sake, or to cause us to suffer in order to groom us to help them. The same is true of them toward us. All of us have benefited from the sacrifices of others and are called to make sacrifices for others.

It is a hard truth that God sometimes asks us to accept suffering for the sake of others, and we are blessed by the sufferings of others who made many sacrifices for the things that we enjoy.

This is the communal dimension of suffering. How has God prepared you, through sufferings today, to be able to help others?

Biblical stories have a wonderful way of teaching truth and of teaching us about our own life. And thus the Patriarch Joseph speaks to us from antiquity, from the pages of God’s holy Word. Somehow, I can hear Joseph saying that God can make a way out of no way. Somehow, I can hear him calling us to courage in our sufferings, and to perspective. Somehow, I can hear him singing the words of an old gospel hymn: “God never fails. He abides in me, give me the victory for God never fails!”

The post What We Can Learn About Suffering in the Story of Joseph the Patriarch appeared first on Community in Mission.

01:22

Coincidence? We Think Not [The TOF Spot]

Visitors from the stars???  Lots of aliens visiting New Hampshire these days.

h/t Gary Armitage

01:16

Bishop Morlino: Put Jesus Front and Center [LES FEMMES - THE TRUTH]


The Tabernacle Isn't Just a Piece of the Furniture!

And by 2018, all the church's in his diocese will move the tabernacle back where it belongs -- in the center of the sanctuary. Praised be to Jesus Christ and two thumbs up for Bishop Morlino!

And two thumbs up to the pastor of St. Louis Catholic Church in Alexandria, VA. St. Louis was our family parish for over thirty years. During that time we grieved to see the tabernacle moved to a tiny side altar. In the latest renovation, the current pastor, Fr. Matthew Zuberbueler, moved Jesus back where he belongs to the center of the Church.

When a worshiper enters a Catholic Church, there should be no question about its purpose, the honor and glory of God especially in the Real Presence of His Son here on earth. The larger "house of the Lord" is only there for the worship of the one who dwells within the little golden house on the altar. Thank you, Bishop Morlino and Fr. Zuberbueler. May other bishops and clergymen follow your example to make the house of the Lord a fitting place for worshiping the King of the Universe.

01:00

Jouis Billot SJ. Tradition und Modernismus. - Eine Buchbesprechung. [et nunc]

Normal 0 21 false false false DE X-NONE X-NONE Seit Jahrzehnten hört man im katholischen Mainstream nichts mehr über den Modernismus; folglich muß er überwunden sein, richtig? Falsch! Dies wird bereits auf den ersten Seiten des Buches „Tradition und Modernismus“ deutlich, welches vor gut einem Jahrhundert von Louis Kardinal Billot SJ verfaßt wurde und im Jahr 2014 auf Deutsch im „Carthusianus Verlag“ erschienen ist.


Denn eine der Thesen, die damals von modernistischer Seite vorgebracht wurden, hören wir – so oder so ähnlich – auch heute noch: „Der Glaube hat hier auf Erden keine dauerhafte Wohnstätte, selbst wenn er stets bemüht ist, sich vorübergehende Behausungen zu suchen. Insbesondere wäre es vergeblich, ihn in den mittlerweile veralteten Formen aufrechtzuerhalten, die einer anderen Mentalität entsprechen und jetzt nichts mehr sein können als die ehrwürdigen Zeugnisse einer vergangenen Zeit.“

Das obige Zitat stammt von Alfred Loisy, gegen den das Werk von Billot, welches ursprünglich den Titel „De immutabilitate traditionis contra novam hæresim evolutionismi“ – auf Deutsch: „Über die Unveränderbarkeit der Tradition gegen die neue Häresie des Evolutionismus“ – erschienen war, hauptsächlich gerichtet ist. Entsprechend findet sich im abschließenden sechsten Kapitel auf etwa 30 Seiten eine „Anhäufig von Irrtümern“, die aus den Schriften Loisys extrahiert wurden.

„De immutabilitate traditionis“ ist eingeteilt in sechs Kapitel. Es handelt sich nicht um eine Polemik, sondern um eine kurze Abhandlung, die auch den Laien in die Problematik einzuführen vermag, wobei Billot trotz allem kaum als „leichte Lektüre“ kategorisiert werden kann. Im ersten Kapitel diskutiert der Autor, was die Kirche meint, wenn sie von „Tradition“ spricht. Sodann widmet er sich Einwänden, die man gegen die Tradition als solche vorbringen könnte. Das Auftreten scheinbarer Widersprüche, so erläutert Louis Kardinal Billot jedoch, ist leicht zu erklären. Zwar sei die Lehre der Tradition immer dieselbe, doch sei sie nicht von jeder Person zu jedem Zeitpunkt in derselben Weise ausgebildet und ausgeführt. Es gebe drei Stadien: den einfachen Glauben, ein Zwischenstadium sowie das Stadium der vollständigen Erklärung.

Das dritte Kapitel beschäftigt sich mit den Fehlern der historischen Methode bei der Kritik der Zeugnisse der Tradition. Die historische Methode sei angemessen, um die Tatsache der Offenbarung zu beweisen, nicht jedoch, wenn man die sogenannten „præambula fidei“ hinter sich gelassen hat und den in der Offenbarung enthaltenen Wahrheiten nachgeht. Im vierten und fünften Kapitel geht es Billot um die „relative Wahrheit“ bzw. um den „moralischen Dogmatismus“. Wie angedeutet sammelt das letzte Kapitel die Irrtümer Loisys. Hier ist es nur bedauerlich, daß Billot sich nicht die Zeit nimmt, sie auch zu widerlegen, denn das hätte eine phänomenale Argumentationshilfe sein können. „De immutabilitate traditionis“ vorangestellt ist eine sehr inhaltsreiche Einleitung von Claudia und Peter Barthold, die auch die Übersetzung vorgenommen haben.

Wohin der Modernismus führt, soll zum Abschluß ein längeres Zitat aus „Tradition und Modernismus“ deutlich machen, in dem sich Louis Kardinal Billot auf sarkastische Weise direkt an seine Leser richtet: „Bis jetzt nahmen Sie an, daß es eine moralische Verfehlung sei, wenn man den häretischen Lehrmeinungen beipflichtet, zumindest denen, die man in der althergebrachten Sprache als solche bezeichnete. Aber heute muß Ihnen klar sein, daß Sie hier einem unsinnigen Vorurteil erlegen waren. Mit dem gleichen Anspruch und mit dem gleichen Recht wie die Formeln der römisch-katholischen Kirche könnten jene der Lutheraner, der Sozinianer, der Arianer oder der Muslime auch diese absolute und unbekannte Wahrheit symbolisieren, der alleine anzuhängen Sie stets beabsichtigen. Deshalb spielt es schließlich keine Rolle, seine Zustimmung zu einer Konfession oder zu einer anderen zu geben. Sie sind katholisch? Werden Sie doch Protestant, wenn es Ihnen zusagt. Ja, vielmehr steht dem nichts im Wege, zugleich katholisch und protestantisch zu sein, weil ja das katholische Glaubensbekenntnis keinerlei Schaden erleiden wird, wenn Sie es zugleich mit dem lutheranischen, anglikanischen oder calvinistischen oder auch einem anderen Glaubensbekenntnis verbinden. Und welcher Gläubige wird schließlich nicht die Absicht hegen, alleine der unbekannten Wahrheit anzuhängen, die sich ihm vielleicht eines Tages offenbaren wird? Deshalb stehen wir bereits mit allen Bekenntnissen auf der Welt durch eine Glaubensgemeinschaft in Verbindung, und schon leuchtet das Morgenrot eines Zeitalters, in dem es eine einzige Religion für die ganze Menschheit geben wird, nachdem man für immer alle Trennungen abgeschafft hat, die der alte Aberglaube eingeführt hatte.“ Wenn der einfache Gläubige heute ein Modernist ist, dann selten bewußt und mit böser Absicht. Anzuklagen ist stattdessen eine Hierarchie, die ihre Pflichten hinsichtlich der Verteidigung des Glaubens massiv vernachlässigt hat.


Jouis Billot SJ. Tradition und Modernismus.
Über die Unveränderbarkeit der Tradition gegen die neue Häresie des Evolutionismus.
Übersetzt von Claudia Barthold, Peter Barthold.
236 Seiten, Paperback, 19,80€.



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03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627280102
January 2014
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30310102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930310102
December 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
25262728293001
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30310102030405
November 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293001
October 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
August 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
29303101020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26272829303101
July 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29303101020304
June 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
27282930310102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
May 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
29300102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930310102
April 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29300102030405
March 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
25262728010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
February 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728010203
January 2013
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
31010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
December 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
26272829300102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31010203040506
November 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
29303101020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26272829300102
October 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29303101020304
September 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
27282930310102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
June 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293001
May 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
March 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
27282901020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26272829303101
February 2012
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30310102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282901020304
December 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293001020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26272829303101
November 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
31010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293001020304
July 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
27282930010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
April 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293001
March 2011
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
November 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
29300102030405
August 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
26272829303101
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30310102030405
June 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
31010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293001020304
January 2010
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
28293031010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
December 2009
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
30010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031010203
November 2009
MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
26272829303101
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30010203040506